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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War. Search the whole document.

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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
nized and went into operation in March, 1862, and became a valuable auxiliary in the work of colportage and tract distribution. By midsummer it had put in circulation nearly 800,000 pages of tracts, and had ten efficient colporteurs in the field. Its operations steadily increased to the close of the war; and besides the dissemination of millions of pages of excellent religious reading, with thousands of Bibles and Testaments, two semi-monthly papers were issued, The soldiers' paper, at Richmond, Va.. and The army and Navy Herald, at Macon, Ga., 40,000 copies of which were circulated every month throughout the armies. In addition to these, there were other associations of a like character successfully at work in this wide and inviting field. The Georgia Bible and Colportage Society, Rev. F. M. Haygood, Agent, was actively engaged in the work of printing and circulating tracts in the armies of the Southwest. The South Carolina Tract Society was an earnest ally in the holy ca
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
brave armies. If it could be known by us here and now how many souls have been saved by this agency, doubtless the announcement would fill us with surprise and rejoicing. Hundreds and thousands, we verily believe, have in this way obtained the Christian's hope, and are now occupying some place in the great vineyard of the Lord, or have gone up from the strife and sorrow of earth to the peaceful enjoyments of the heavenly home. The Evangelical Tract Society, organized in the city of Petersburg, Va., in July, 1861, by Christians of the different denominations, was a most efficient auxiliary in the great work of saving souls. It was ably officered, and worked with great success in the publication and circulation of some of the best tract reading that appeared during the war. More than a hundred different tracts were issued; and in less than one year after the organization of the Society, it had sent among the soldiers more than a million pages of these little messengers of truth.
Barnstable, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
returned from India to my native country and visited Ilfracombe. There I was invited to preach in the open air, a few miles distant. Preparations were made for my visit, and during the time that I was preaching, I saw a tall, gray-headed man in the crowd, weeping, and a tall young man, who looked like his sol, standing by his side, and weeping also. At the conclusion of the service they both came up to me, and the father said: Do you recollect giving tracts to the local militia at Barnstable, some years ago? Yes. Do you recollect anything particular of that distribution? Yes, I recollect one of the grenadiers swore at me till he made me weep. Stop, said he, Oh, sir, I am the man! I never forgave myself for that wicked act. But I hope it has led me to repentance, and that God has forgiven me. And now, let me ask, will you forgive me? It quite overcame me for the moment, and we parted with a prayer that we might meet in heaven. Is not this encouragement?
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
nthly papers were issued, The soldiers' paper, at Richmond, Va.. and The army and Navy Herald, at Macon, Ga., 40,000 copies of which were circulated every month throughout the armies. In addition to these, there were other associations of a like character successfully at work in this wide and inviting field. The Georgia Bible and Colportage Society, Rev. F. M. Haygood, Agent, was actively engaged in the work of printing and circulating tracts in the armies of the Southwest. The South Carolina Tract Society was an earnest ally in the holy cause, and sent out its share of tracts to swell the vast number scattered like leaves of the tree of life all over the land. The presses in every great commercial centre were busy in throwing off religious reading of every description, and yet so great was the demand that the supply was unequal to it during the whole of the war. At Richmond, Raleigh, Columbia, Charleston, Augusta, Mobile, Macon, Atlanta, and other cities, good men labored
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
rculating tracts in the armies of the Southwest. The South Carolina Tract Society was an earnest ally in the holy cause, and sent out its share of tracts to swell the vast number scattered like leaves of the tree of life all over the land. The presses in every great commercial centre were busy in throwing off religious reading of every description, and yet so great was the demand that the supply was unequal to it during the whole of the war. At Richmond, Raleigh, Columbia, Charleston, Augusta, Mobile, Macon, Atlanta, and other cities, good men labored day and night to give our gallant soldiers the bread of life; and still the cry from the army was, Send us more good books. At one period of the war the Baptist Board alone circulated 200,000 pages of tracts weekly, besides Testaments and hymn-books; and with the joint labors of other societies, we may estimate that when the work was at its height not less than 1,000,000 pages a week were put into the hands of our soldiers. Ou
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
nd became a valuable auxiliary in the work of colportage and tract distribution. By midsummer it had put in circulation nearly 800,000 pages of tracts, and had ten efficient colporteurs in the field. Its operations steadily increased to the close of the war; and besides the dissemination of millions of pages of excellent religious reading, with thousands of Bibles and Testaments, two semi-monthly papers were issued, The soldiers' paper, at Richmond, Va.. and The army and Navy Herald, at Macon, Ga., 40,000 copies of which were circulated every month throughout the armies. In addition to these, there were other associations of a like character successfully at work in this wide and inviting field. The Georgia Bible and Colportage Society, Rev. F. M. Haygood, Agent, was actively engaged in the work of printing and circulating tracts in the armies of the Southwest. The South Carolina Tract Society was an earnest ally in the holy cause, and sent out its share of tracts to swell t
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
g missionaries to the army, and in printing and circulating tracts. Rev. Messrs. Gatewood and Kepler, of the Protestant Episcopal Church, were the zealous directors of operations in Virginia, while in other States such men as Bishop Elliott, of Georgia, Doctor, now Bishop, Quintard, of Tennessee, and the lamented General Polk, gave the weight of their influence and the power of their eloquence, written and oral, to promote the cause of religion among our soldiers. At Raleigh, N. C., early ilately sixteen conversions. One young man was very anxious to learn to read. I procured him a spelling-book, and in a few days he learned so rapidly as to be able to read the Testament. He has since professed religion. A middle-aged man from Georgia has learned to read since he joined the army, and has committed to memory almost all the New Testament with the book of Job. Another faithful laborer says: A young man said to me, Parson, you gave me a book, (Baxter's Call,) which I have been
Lauderdale (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Mississippi, where I found 3,000 sick. They are greedy, yea ravenous, in their appetite for something to read. Under the labors of your colporteurs there has been a revival of religion at Quitman, and there is also a revival in progress at Lauderdale Springs. The surgeons have been especially kind to me-at times calling my attention to certain cases of the sick, at others making appointments for me to preach. Rev. S. A. Creath, Army of Tennessee: I am still following up the army, trying to ns, &c., the reading of which seemed to melt every heart, and the entire audience was in tears before God. Every word in reference to spiritual truth fell with a soft, subduing fervor on their chastened hearts. Lately a colpoteur at Lauderdale Springs, Miss., was distributing tracts, and a captain approached him and asked for one. Select for yourself, captain, said he. The captain looked over them, and selected Don't Swear, and began to read it aloud to the soldiers standing around, pausing
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
mmended to the Board to appoint at once, if practicable, a sufficient number of colporteurs to occupy all the important points of rendezvous, and promptly to reach all the soldiers in service in the State; that during the war as many colporteurs as could be profitably employed, and as the means of the Board would admit, be kept in service; that special contributions to colportage should be raised from the Baptist churches, from the community, and even from such persons in other of the Confederate States as may feel interested in the welfare of the soldiers who are gathered from various Southern States to fight their common battles on the soil of Virginia; that steps should be taken to secure the issue of a tract or tracts specially adapted to general circulation among the soldiers. The work was put in charge of Rev. A. E. Dickinson, who had already acquired a valuable experience and a high reputation as the Superintendent of Colportage under the direction of the General Association
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
and yet so great was the demand that the supply was unequal to it during the whole of the war. At Richmond, Raleigh, Columbia, Charleston, Augusta, Mobile, Macon, Atlanta, and other cities, good men labored day and night to give our gallant soldiers the bread of life; and still the cry from the army was, Send us more good books. Ak, at others making appointments for me to preach. Rev. S. A. Creath, Army of Tennessee: I am still following up the army, trying to be of service to them. At Atlanta I saw 3,000 sick men. Started to work this morning before sun up, and by 9 A. M. had distributed 20,000 pages of tracts. Several have professed religion, and thefession of religion, whilst others are deeply interested in divine things. We need more tracts and more Bibles. Rev. J. A. Hughes thus speaks of his labors at Atlanta: In going among the thousands in the hospitals, I have met with many things to gladden my heart, and to cause me to love the work. I find a number of Christians
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