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Cambridge (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
e battles of the Seven Days, but burying her sorrows in her heart, she took charge of a ward on the Transport when it returned, and from the summer of 1862 till the close of the war was in charge as lady superintendent, of the Armory Square Hospital, Washington. Other ladies hardly less active were Mrs. Amelia L. Holmes, wife of the poet and essayist, Miss Hannah E. Stevenson, Miss Ira E. Loring, Mrs. George H. Shaw, Mrs. Martin Brimmer and Mrs. William B. Rogers. Miss Mary Felton, of Cambridge, Mass., served for a long time with her friend, Miss Anna Lowell, at Armory Square Hospital, Washington. Miss Louise M. Alcott, daughter of A. B. Alcott, of Concord, Mass., and herself the author of a little book on Hospital scenes, as well as other works, was for some time an efficient nurse in one of the Washington hospitals. Among the leaders in the organization of Soldiers' Aid Societies in the smaller cities and towns, those ladies who gave the impulse which during the whole war vibra
Jefferson Barracks (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
s at Cairo, in July, 1861, afterward to Bird's Point, where she lived in a tent and subsisted on the soldiers' rations, for more than a year. After a short visit home she was sent in January, 1863, by the Sanitary Commission to Paducah, Ky., where she remained till the following October. In February, 1864, she was assigned to Benton Barracks Hospital where she continued till June 1st, 1864, except a short sickness contracted by hospital service. In July, 1864, she was transferred to Jefferson Barracks Hospital and continued there till June, 1865, and that hospital being closed, served a month or two longer, in one of the others, in which some sick and wounded soldiers were still left. Many hundreds of the soldiers will testify to her untiring assiduity in caring for them. Mrs. Arabella Tannehill, of Iowa, after many months of assiduous work at the Benton Barracks Hospital, went to the Nashville hospitals, where she performed excellent service, being a most conscientious and fai
Franklin (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
aldwell Miss E. L. Porter of Niagara Falls Boston Ladies Mrs. And Miss Anna Lowell, Mrs. O. W. Holmes, Miss Stevenson, Mrs. S. Loring, Mrs. Shaw, Mrs. Brimmer, Miss Rogers, Miss Felton. Louisville, Ky. Mrs. Bishop Smith and Mrs. Menefee Columbus, Ohio Mrs. Hoyle, Mrs. Ide, Miss Swayne Mrs. Seward of Utica Mrs. Corven, of Hartford, Conn Miss long, of Rochester Mrs. Farr, of Norwalk, Ohio Miss Bartlett, of the soldiers' Aid Society, Peoria, ill. Mrs. Russell and Mrs. Comstock, of Miche who came within the sphere of their influence, there are very many eminently deserving of a place in our record. A few we must name. Mrs. Heyle, Mrs. Ide and Miss Swayne, daughter of Judge Swayne of the United States Supreme Court, all of Columbus, Ohio, did an excellent work there. The Soldiers' Home of that city, founded and sustained by their efforts, was one of the best in the country. Mrs. T. W. Seward, of Utica, was indefatigable in her efforts for maintaining in its highest conditio
South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
ouisville, Ky. Mrs. Bishop Smith and Mrs. Menefee Columbus, Ohio Mrs. Hoyle, Mrs. Ide, Miss Swayne Mrs. Seward of Utica Mrs. Corven, of Hartford, Conn Miss long, of Rochester Mrs. Farr, of Norwalk, Ohio Miss Bartlett, of the soldiers' Aid Society, Peoria, ill. Mrs. Russell and Mrs. Comstock, of Michigan, Mrs. Dame, of Wisconsin Miss Bucklin, of Auburn, N. Y. Miss Louise M. Alcott, of Concord, Mass. Miss Penfield, of Michigan the Misses Rexford of Illinois Miss Sophia Knight, of South reading, Mass., a faithful laborer among the Freedmen So abundant and universal was the patriotism and self-sacrifice of the loyal women of the nation that the long list of heroic names whose deeds of mercy we have recorded in the preceding pages gives only a very inadequate idea of woman's work in the war. These were but the generals or at most the commanders of regiments, and staff-officers, while the great army of patient workers followed in their train. In every department of philant
Norwalk (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
haw, Mrs. Brimmer, Miss Rogers, Miss Felton. Louisville, Ky. Mrs. Bishop Smith and Mrs. Menefee Columbus, Ohio Mrs. Hoyle, Mrs. Ide, Miss Swayne Mrs. Seward of Utica Mrs. Corven, of Hartford, Conn Miss long, of Rochester Mrs. Farr, of Norwalk, Ohio Miss Bartlett, of the soldiers' Aid Society, Peoria, ill. Mrs. Russell and Mrs. Comstock, of Michigan, Mrs. Dame, of Wisconsin Miss Bucklin, of Auburn, N. Y. Miss Louise M. Alcott, of Concord, Mass. Miss Penfield, of Michigan the Missess for the purpose of working for the soldiers and their families, which rapidly spread thence over the country. Never flagging in her efforts for the soldiers, Mrs. Farr exerted a powerful and almost electric influence over the region of which Norwalk is the centre. Equally efficient, and perhaps exerting a wider influence, was the Secretary of the Soldiers' Aid Society at Peoria, Ill., Miss Mary E. Bartlett, a lady of superior culture and refinement, and indefatigable in her exertions for
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
Nashville, Tennessee, and in 1864 was transferred to Benton Barracks, but was almost immediately prostrated by illness, and after her recovery returned to the Tennessee hospitals. Her gentle sympathizing manners, and her kindness to the soldiers won for her their regard and gratitude. Miss Lucy J. Bissell, of Meremec, St. Louis County, Mo., offered her services as volunteer nurse as soon as the call for nurses in 1861, was issued; and was first sent to one of the regimental hospitals at Cairo, in July, 1861, afterward to Bird's Point, where she lived in a tent and subsisted on the soldiers' rations, for more than a year. After a short visit home she was sent in January, 1863, by the Sanitary Commission to Paducah, Ky., where she remained till the following October. In February, 1864, she was assigned to Benton Barracks Hospital where she continued till June 1st, 1864, except a short sickness contracted by hospital service. In July, 1864, she was transferred to Jefferson Barrac
Catharine Tilton (search for this): chapter 26
. J. Page, Miss Jane Patrick, since deceased, Mrs. R. H. Stone, Mrs. C. P. Coolidge, Mrs. S. R. Ward, Mrs. Washington King, Mrs. Wyllys King, Miss Fales, since deceased. The following were among the noble women at Springfield, Ill., who were most devoted in their labors for the soldier in forwarding sanitary supplies, in visiting the hospitals in and near Springfield, in sustaining the Soldiers' Home in that city, and in aiding the families of soldiers. Mrs. Lucretia Jane Tilton, Miss Catharine Tilton, Mrs. Lucretia P. Wood, Mrs. P. C. Latham, Mrs. M. E. Halbert, Mrs. Zimmerman, Mrs. J. D. B. Salter, Mrs. John Ives, Mrs. Mary Engleman, Mrs. Paul Selby, Mrs. S. H. Melvin, Mrs. Stoneberger, Mrs. Schaums, Mrs. E. Curtiss, Mrs. L. Snell, Mrs. J. Nutt and Mrs. J. P. Reynolds. Mrs. R. H. Bennison, of Quincy, Ill., was also a faithful hospital visitor and friend of the soldier. Mrs. Dr. Ely, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, efficient in every good work throughout the war, and at its close the act
Bishop Smith (search for this): chapter 26
sitors in the St. Louis hospitals Ladies who ministered to the soldiers in Quincy, and in Springfield, Illinois Miss Georgiana Willets, Misses Molineux and McCabe Ladies of Cincinnati who served in the hospitals Mrs. C. J. Wright, Mrs. Starbuck, Mrs. Gibson, Mrs. Woods and Mrs. Caldwell Miss E. L. Porter of Niagara Falls Boston Ladies Mrs. And Miss Anna Lowell, Mrs. O. W. Holmes, Miss Stevenson, Mrs. S. Loring, Mrs. Shaw, Mrs. Brimmer, Miss Rogers, Miss Felton. Louisville, Ky. Mrs. Bishop Smith and Mrs. Menefee Columbus, Ohio Mrs. Hoyle, Mrs. Ide, Miss Swayne Mrs. Seward of Utica Mrs. Corven, of Hartford, Conn Miss long, of Rochester Mrs. Farr, of Norwalk, Ohio Miss Bartlett, of the soldiers' Aid Society, Peoria, ill. Mrs. Russell and Mrs. Comstock, of Michigan, Mrs. Dame, of Wisconsin Miss Bucklin, of Auburn, N. Y. Miss Louise M. Alcott, of Concord, Mass. Miss Penfield, of Michigan the Misses Rexford of Illinois Miss Sophia Knight, of South reading, Mass., a fai
Rebecca M. Craighead (search for this): chapter 26
Omaha, Nebraska, was a very faithful and excellent nurse at the Benton Barracks Hospital. Mrs. Juliana Day, the wife of a surgeon in one of the Nashville hospitals, acted as a volunteer nurse for them, and by her protracted services there impaired her health and died before the close of the war. Other efficient nurses appointed by the Western Sanitary Commission (and there were none more efficient anywhere) were, Miss Carrie C. McNair, Miss N. A. Shepard, Miss C. A. Harwood, Miss Rebecca M. Craighead, Miss Ida Johnson, Mrs. Dorothea Ogden, Miss Harriet N. Phillips, Mrs. A. Reese, Mrs. Maria Brooks, Mrs. Mary Otis, Miss Harriet Peabody, Mrs. M. A. Wells, Mrs. Florence P. Sterling, Miss N. L. Ostram, Mrs. Anne Ward, Miss Isabella M. Hartshorn, Mrs. Mary Ellis, Mrs. L. E. Lathrop, Miss Louisa Otis, Mrs. Lydia Leach, Mrs. Mary Andrews, Mrs. Mary Ludlow, Mrs. Hannah A. Haines and Mrs. Mary Allen. Most of these were from St. Louis or its vicinity. The following, also for the most
Ladies who ministered to the soldiers in Quincy, and in Springfield, Illinois Miss Georgiana Willets, Misses Molineux and McCabe Ladies of Cincinnati who served in the hospitals Mrs. C. J. Wright, Mrs. Starbuck, Mrs. Gibson, Mrs. Woods and Mrs. Caldwell Miss E. L. Porter of Niagara Falls Boston Ladies Mrs. And Miss Anna Lowell, Mrs. O. W. Holmes, Miss Stevenson, Mrs. S. Loring, Mrs. Shaw, Mrs. Brimmer, Miss Rogers, Miss Felton. Louisville, Ky. Mrs. Bishop Smith and Mrs. Menefee Columbuaried in her efforts to provide comforts for the soldiers in the general hospitals of the city as well as for the sick or wounded soldiers of her husband's regiment in the field. Mrs. C. W. Starbuck, Mrs. Peter Gibson, Mrs. William Woods and Mrs. Caldwell, were also active in visiting the hospitals and gave largely to the soldiers who were sick there. Miss Penfield and Mrs. Elizabeth S. Comstock, of Michigan, Mrs. C. E. Russell, of Detroit, Mrs. Harriet B. Dame, of Wisconsin and the Misses Re
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