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Galena (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
pits which line the shore. No one can tell us as yet what work there is for us; the wounded have not come in. Hospital Transport Spaulding, July 3d. Reached Harrison's Bar at 11 A. M., July 1st, and were ordered to go up the James River, as far as Carter's Landing. To do this we must pass the batteries at City Point. We were told there was no danger if we should carry a yellow flag; yellow flag we had none, so we trusted to the red Sanitary Commission, and prepared to run it. The Galena hailed us to keep below, as we passed the battery. Shortly after, we came up with The Monitor, and the little captain, with his East India hat, trumpet in hand, repeated the advice of The Galena, and added, that if he heard firing, he would follow us. Our cannon pointed its black muzzle at the shore, and on we went. As we left The Monitor, the captain came to me, with his grim smile, and said, I'll take those mattresses you spoke of. We had joked, as people will, about our danger, and I
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
be. Their duties consisted in nursing, preparing food for the sick and wounded, dressing wounds, in connexion with the surgeons and medical students, and in general, making themselves useful to the great numbers of wounded and sick who were placed temporarily under their charge. Often they provided them with clean beds and hospital clothing, and suitable food in preparation for their voyage to Washington, Philadelphia, or New York. These four ladies were Miss Katherine P. Wormeley, of Newport, R. I., Mrs. William P. Griffin, of New York, one of the executive board of the Woman's Central Association of Relief, Mrs. Eliza. W. Howland, wife of Colonel (afterward General) Joseph Howland, and her sister, Miss Georgiana Woolsey, both of New York. Among those who were in charge of the Hospital Transports for one or more of their trips to the cities we have named, and by their tenderness and gentleness comforted and cheered the poor sufferers, and often by their skilful nursing rescued t
Elm Center (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
he stores shipped, and the hospital corps for it assembled, it reached York River on the 30th of April. Other boats were subsequently, (several of them, very soon) assigned to the Commission, and were successively fitted up, and after receiving their freights of sick and wounded, sent to Washington, Philadelphia, New York and other points with their precious cargoes, which were to be transferred to the general hospitals. Among these vessels were the Ocean Queen, the S. R. Spaulding, the Elm City, the Daniel Webster, No. 2, the Knickerbocker, the clipper ships Euterpe and St. Mark, and the Commission chartered the Wilson small, and the Elizabeth, two small steamers, as tender and supply boats. The Government were vacillating in their management in regard to these vessels, often taking them from the Commission just when partially or wholly fitted up, on the plea of requiring them for some purpose and assigning another vessel, often poorly adapted to their service, on board of which
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
rror-stricken boats; the people of the big St. Mark leaned, pale, over their bulwarks, to question us. Nothing could be more delightful than to be as calm and monosyllabic as we were. We leave at daybreak for Harrison's Bar, James River, where our gunboats are said to be; we hope to get further up, but General Dix warns us that it is not safe. What are we about to learn? No one here can tell. (Harrison's Bar, July 2d). We arrived here yesterday to hear the thunder of the battle, Malvern Hill. and to find the army just approaching this landing; last night it was a verdant shore, to-day it is a dusty plain. The Spaulding has passed and gone ahead of us; her ironsides can carry her safely past the rifle-pits which line the shore. No one can tell us as yet what work there is for us; the wounded have not come in. Hospital Transport Spaulding, July 3d. Reached Harrison's Bar at 11 A. M., July 1st, and were ordered to go up the James River, as far as Carter's Landing. T
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
The Hospital Transport service. The organization of this service by the United States Sanitary Commission difficulties encountered steamers and sailing vessels employed the corps of Ladies employed in the service the headquarters' staff Ladies plying on the Transports to Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, and elsewhere work on the Daniel Webster the Ocean Queen difficulties in providing as rapidly as was desired for the numerous patients duties of the Ladies who belonged to the headquarters' staff description of scenes in the work by Miss Wormeley and Miss G. Woolsey taking on patients butter on soft bread Guess I can stand h'isting better'n him spare the darning needles slippers only fit for pontoon bridges visiting Government Transports Scrambling eggs in a wash-basin Subduing the captain of a tug the battle of Fair Oaks bad management on Government Transports sufferings of the wounded Sanitary Commission Relief tent at the wharf
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
were ordered up to City Point, under a flag of truce, to receive our wounded men who were prisoners in Richmond. At last the whistle sounded and the train came in sight. The poor fellows set up a weak cheer at the sight of the old flag, and those who had the strength hobbled and tumbled off the train almost before it stopped. We took four hundred and one on board. Two other vessels which accompanied us took each two hundred more. The rebel soldiers had been kind to our men,so they said,--but the citizens had taken pains to insult them. One man burst into tears as he was telling me of their misery: May God defend me from such again. God took him to Himself, poor suffering soul! He died the next morning,--died because he would not let them take off his arm. I wasn't going to let them have it in Richmond; I said I would take it back to old Massachusetts. Of course we had a hard voyage with our poor fellows in such a condition, but, at least, they were cleaned and well fed.
East India (search for this): chapter 9
aulding, July 3d. Reached Harrison's Bar at 11 A. M., July 1st, and were ordered to go up the James River, as far as Carter's Landing. To do this we must pass the batteries at City Point. We were told there was no danger if we should carry a yellow flag; yellow flag we had none, so we trusted to the red Sanitary Commission, and prepared to run it. The Galena hailed us to keep below, as we passed the battery. Shortly after, we came up with The Monitor, and the little captain, with his East India hat, trumpet in hand, repeated the advice of The Galena, and added, that if he heard firing, he would follow us. Our cannon pointed its black muzzle at the shore, and on we went. As we left The Monitor, the captain came to me, with his grim smile, and said, I'll take those mattresses you spoke of. We had joked, as people will, about our danger, and I had suggested mattresses round the wheel-house, never thinking that he would try it. But the captain was in earnest; when was he anything
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
g out of what had been to us, through these strange weeks, a sort of home, where all had worked together and been happy; a place which is sacred to some of us now for its intense living remembrances, and for the hallowing of them all by the memory of one who, through months of death and darkness, lived and worked in self-abnegation, lived in and for the suffering of others, and finally gave himself a sacrifice for them. Dr. Robert Ware. We are coaling here to-night ( Wilson Small, off Norfolk, June 30th, 1862). We left White House Saturday night, and rendezvoused at West Point. Captain Sawtelle sent us off early, with despatches for Fortress Monroe; this gave us the special fun of being the first to come leisurely into the panic then raging at Yorktown. The Small was instantly surrounded by terror-stricken boats; the people of the big St. Mark leaned, pale, over their bulwarks, to question us. Nothing could be more delightful than to be as calm and monosyllabic as we were. We
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
and supplied with the stores of the Commission, the boats which the Medical officers of the army had pressed into the service filled with wounded and sent without comfort, food or attendance, on their way to the hospitals in the vicinity of Fortress Monroe; superintended the shipping of patients on the steamers which returned from the North; took account of the stores needed by these boats and saw that they were sent on board; fitted up the new boats furnished to the Commission by the Quartermacrifice for them. Dr. Robert Ware. We are coaling here to-night ( Wilson Small, off Norfolk, June 30th, 1862). We left White House Saturday night, and rendezvoused at West Point. Captain Sawtelle sent us off early, with despatches for Fortress Monroe; this gave us the special fun of being the first to come leisurely into the panic then raging at Yorktown. The Small was instantly surrounded by terror-stricken boats; the people of the big St. Mark leaned, pale, over their bulwarks, to que
Carter's Landing (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
t come in. Hospital Transport Spaulding, July 3d. Reached Harrison's Bar at 11 A. M., July 1st, and were ordered to go up the James River, as far as Carter's Landing. To do this we must pass the batteries at City Point. We were told there was no danger if we should carry a yellow flag; yellow flag we had none, so we trut the wheel-house, and the pilot stood against the mast, with a mattress slung in the rigging to protect him. In an hour we had passed the danger and reached Carter's Landing, and there was the army, all that was left of it. Over all the bank, on the lawns of that lovely spot, under the shade of the large trees that fringed thes; others went by land or ambulances, and some — it seems incredible-walked the distance. Others were left behind and taken prisoners; for the enemy reached Carter's Landing as we left it. The work of the Commission upon the hospital transports was about to close. But before it was all over, the various vessels had made se
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