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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865. Search the whole document.

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Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
nt, under a flag of truce, and were met by officers of the regiment. Arrangements were made by them to bury the dead between the lines and the enemy asked that a party be sent inside their lines to care for Union wounded and bury the dead. Such a detail was furnished. Inside their line Jacob Hazen of Company C was found mortally wounded, and he died before the detail got through its labors. On September 19 the regiment marched 16 miles to Bolivar Heights, fording the Potomac at Harper's Ferry, at the same place it had crossed in the spring. Here on September 22, the command went into camp on the same ground where it had stopped in the previous march and from which it had started to join the army of the Potomac, not one foot nearer Richmond for all the hard marches and desperate fighting. It was not an encouraging thought. The tents were pitched on the side of the hill. Maryland Heights towered grandly on one side, while Loudon sheltered the other side and the front was
Maryland Heights (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
evious march and from which it had started to join the army of the Potomac, not one foot nearer Richmond for all the hard marches and desperate fighting. It was not an encouraging thought. The tents were pitched on the side of the hill. Maryland Heights towered grandly on one side, while Loudon sheltered the other side and the front was covered by Bolivar. The position was like a triangle, the sides being the various Heights, while the openings made by the Potomac and the Shenandoah formedor fight was 200. At Bolivar Heights the regiment took its ease and comfort and soon was ready for another battle. The weather was glorious, the scenery as enchanting as any in America. The lovely mount of Loudon, the rugged grandeur of Maryland Heights, the swell of Bolivar, the plain of Charlestown, the western background of the Blue Ridge and the beautiful junction of the Potomac and the Shenandoah formed a picture richer far than many scenes across the sea. The men were put through
Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
all the hard marches and desperate fighting. It was not an encouraging thought. The tents were pitched on the side of the hill. Maryland Heights towered grandly on one side, while Loudon sheltered the other side and the front was covered by Bolivar. The position was like a triangle, the sides being the various Heights, while the openings made by the Potomac and the Shenandoah formed the angles. The work of recuperating the Nineteenth commenced at once. It was rumored that the regimentivar Heights the regiment took its ease and comfort and soon was ready for another battle. The weather was glorious, the scenery as enchanting as any in America. The lovely mount of Loudon, the rugged grandeur of Maryland Heights, the swell of Bolivar, the plain of Charlestown, the western background of the Blue Ridge and the beautiful junction of the Potomac and the Shenandoah formed a picture richer far than many scenes across the sea. The men were put through a severe course of drill a
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 19
mpany B28 Company C28 Company D22 Company E28 Company F38 Company G35 Company H30 Company I37 Company K25 306 This included every man in the regiment capable of doing the light work of camp, and many of these were quite disabled and unfit for active service. The outside limit of men who could march or fight was 200. At Bolivar Heights the regiment took its ease and comfort and soon was ready for another battle. The weather was glorious, the scenery as enchanting as any in America. The lovely mount of Loudon, the rugged grandeur of Maryland Heights, the swell of Bolivar, the plain of Charlestown, the western background of the Blue Ridge and the beautiful junction of the Potomac and the Shenandoah formed a picture richer far than many scenes across the sea. The men were put through a severe course of drill and this, with camp guard and picket, were the duties of the time. Five glorious weeks were thus spent. The army was refitted, material and personnel were re
Glendale, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
eived in action; Company B.Private Hallowell R. Dunham, Oct. 2nd. Private Rufus H. Cole, Jr., Oct. 5th. Company E.Private Hugh Connelly, Sept. 29th. Company F.Sergeant James Buchanan, Oct. 1st. Private Charles Tibbetts, of Company C, reported Missing in Action at the battle of Antietam, Sept. 17, had not yet returned. During the history of the regiment up to this time, the colors had twice been triumphantly raised by a private when fallen from the death grasp of a comrade,—at Glendale by Peter O'Rourke, and at Antietam by Edward Z. Bailey, and both were made Sergeants on the spot. Five colors sergeants had been shot down while carrying the flag of the Commonwealth. Condition of the regiment at Bolivar Heights, Va., Oct. 13, 1862. Company A35 Company B28 Company C28 Company D22 Company E28 Company F38 Company G35 Company H30 Company I37 Company K25 306 This included every man in the regiment capable of doing the light work of camp, and many of these
George W. Bachelder (search for this): chapter 19
days on account of death in his family, and the command came into the hands of Capt. H. G. O. Weymouth. A number of changes occurred in the regiment in September. Capt. Edmund Rice, absent from wounds, was promoted to major; Capt. Ansel D. Wass was discharged to enable him to be commissioned as Lieutenant Colonel of the 41st Massachusetts regiment; First Lieut. William L. Palmer, of Company I, was appointed Adjutant, vice John C. Chadwick, promoted to Captain of Company C in place of Capt. Bachelder killed in action. First Lieut. Oliver F. Briggs, of Company K, was made Regimental Quartermaster, vice Shaw discharged. First Lieut. Isaac H. Boyd was in command of Company A; Capt. Hale and First Lieut. Reynolds, of Company G were absent on account of wounds, and Second Lieut. Thomas Claffey was in command. Company C had John C. Chadwick, formerly Adjutant of the regiment as Captain, and Edgar M. Newcomb as First Lieutenant. In Company E First Lieut. Elisha A. Hinks who had
Harrison G. O. Weymouth (search for this): chapter 19
at the Battle of Fredericksburg, the rebels thinking they were officers. After the battle of Antietam Lieut. Col. Devereux secured leave of absence for ten days on account of death in his family, and the command came into the hands of Capt. H. G. O. Weymouth. A number of changes occurred in the regiment in September. Capt. Edmund Rice, absent from wounds, was promoted to major; Capt. Ansel D. Wass was discharged to enable him to be commissioned as Lieutenant Colonel of the 41st Massachusemmand of Company I, but First Lieut. Samuel S. Prime, who had been transferred from Company C, was sick. First Sergt. John G. B. Adams of Company A was promoted to Second Lieutenant and assigned to Company H, vice Mumford, promoted. Captain H. G. O. Weymouth, of Company G, was transferred to the command of Company K and was in command of the regiment, leaving First Lieut. Lysander J. Hume in command of the company. Hume had been promoted from Second to First Lieutenant, vice James H. Rice,
Edward Z. Bailey (search for this): chapter 19
Dunham, Oct. 2nd. Private Rufus H. Cole, Jr., Oct. 5th. Company E.Private Hugh Connelly, Sept. 29th. Company F.Sergeant James Buchanan, Oct. 1st. Private Charles Tibbetts, of Company C, reported Missing in Action at the battle of Antietam, Sept. 17, had not yet returned. During the history of the regiment up to this time, the colors had twice been triumphantly raised by a private when fallen from the death grasp of a comrade,—at Glendale by Peter O'Rourke, and at Antietam by Edward Z. Bailey, and both were made Sergeants on the spot. Five colors sergeants had been shot down while carrying the flag of the Commonwealth. Condition of the regiment at Bolivar Heights, Va., Oct. 13, 1862. Company A35 Company B28 Company C28 Company D22 Company E28 Company F38 Company G35 Company H30 Company I37 Company K25 306 This included every man in the regiment capable of doing the light work of camp, and many of these were quite disabled and unfit for active service.
Jonathan F. Plympton (search for this): chapter 19
rom Second Lieutenant, vice Chadwick promoted. Capt. James D. Russell, of Company G, who had been transferred from Company K, was absent, sick, and the command was in the hands of First Lieut. Dudley C. Mumford, who had been promoted from Second Lieutenant, vice Shaw, discharged. The two wounded officers in Company H, Capt. Devereux and First Lieut. Albert Thorndike, had not yet returned to duty and that company was under the command of Second Lieutenant William R. Driver. Capt. Jonathan F. Plympton was in command of Company I, but First Lieut. Samuel S. Prime, who had been transferred from Company C, was sick. First Sergt. John G. B. Adams of Company A was promoted to Second Lieutenant and assigned to Company H, vice Mumford, promoted. Captain H. G. O. Weymouth, of Company G, was transferred to the command of Company K and was in command of the regiment, leaving First Lieut. Lysander J. Hume in command of the company. Hume had been promoted from Second to First Lieutenan
Henry A. Hale (search for this): chapter 19
m wounds, was promoted to major; Capt. Ansel D. Wass was discharged to enable him to be commissioned as Lieutenant Colonel of the 41st Massachusetts regiment; First Lieut. William L. Palmer, of Company I, was appointed Adjutant, vice John C. Chadwick, promoted to Captain of Company C in place of Capt. Bachelder killed in action. First Lieut. Oliver F. Briggs, of Company K, was made Regimental Quartermaster, vice Shaw discharged. First Lieut. Isaac H. Boyd was in command of Company A; Capt. Hale and First Lieut. Reynolds, of Company G were absent on account of wounds, and Second Lieut. Thomas Claffey was in command. Company C had John C. Chadwick, formerly Adjutant of the regiment as Captain, and Edgar M. Newcomb as First Lieutenant. In Company E First Lieut. Elisha A. Hinks who had been transferred from Company B, was absent from wounds. Capt. James H. Rice, of Company F, who had been promoted from First Lieutenant, vice Edmund Rice, promoted to Major, was absent from wo
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