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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865. Search the whole document.

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Chapter 41: reorganization. The engagement at deep Bottom and Ream's Station. From the 23rd of June until July 26th, the regiment, composed of those who had escaped capture, returned convalescents and recruits from depot were reorganized by First. Lieut. Wm. F. Rice, of Brighton, the senior officer left for duty, under whose command it performed much arduous and important work, and was exposed many days. Advantage was taken of the little time not consumed in the above fatigue duties, in drilling the recruits, who were brought up to a good degree of efficiency under the above-named officer's supervision. Here 62 more recruits were received from the depot. At 4 P. M. on the 26th of July, the regiment under orders with the brigade, took up the line of march to the Appomattox, which was crossed on pontoons at 11 P. M. of that night, and continued on until 9 A. M. of the following morning (July 27), crossing the James at Deep Bottom at the above hour, and halted in the breastwo
ested for a couple of hours, anticipating a flank movement of the enemy, and at the same time being in supporting distance of the cavalry who were engaging the enemy. The skirmishers who had been out all the afternoon were then called in, and the regiment retraced its steps to the scene of the fight of the 27th. Occupied that night and the next day in strengthening its position. At dusk fell back under orders, and commenced the return march toward Petersburg, which was reached on the 30th of July, and were immediately placed in reserve of the Fifth Corps, who occupied the front line of works, and who had been heavily engaged all day. Remained there until 7 P. M. exposed to the enemy's shells, some of which exploded in the brigade, and at that hour proceeded to the camp vacated on the 26th, being on the move during that time, and the men were thoroughly tired out by their four days operations, during which they marched by day and worked by night. Col. Wass had been mustered out
August 12th (search for this): chapter 41
ld and Staff; one Lieutenant Colonel, one Major, two Surgeons, one Quartermaster and one Adjutant, which leaves but 11 officers (of whom only two are present) for duty. The command in the field numbers 100. Prisoners of war and absent, sick and wounded which latter are daily returning, convalescent amount now to 317, the balance being upon detached service in the field. Only two First Lieutenants are present, one of them acting as Adjutant, and most of the men are recruits. On the 12th of August another movement to the north of the James was begun. The little command broke camp and took up its line of march in brigade toward City Point which was reached at 9.30 P. M. There the men embarked on a transport, which moved out and anchored with the rest of the fleet. At 10 P. M. the boats moved down the river but, under cover of the night, returned and ascended the James, arriving at Deep Bottom at midnight, and at 7 A. M. of the 14th, the men debarked. After a short rest the regim
August 16th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 41
he depleted numbers of the regiment did not allow of promotions to fill the other vacancies, Captains Merritt and Hale and Lieut. Driver having been discharged to receive other appointments. Lieut. Col. Rice who had escaped from prison, returned to the regiment with a new set of colors early in the month of August and at once assumed command, but only one flag, the National, was ever carried afterward. He found the command in very bad shape, numerically, as an official report dated August 16th, 1864, shows. The enlisted men then borne upon the rolls numbered 486, with 17 commissioned officers,—a total of 503. The report says: Amon the officers are included the following Field and Staff; one Lieutenant Colonel, one Major, two Surgeons, one Quartermaster and one Adjutant, which leaves but 11 officers (of whom only two are present) for duty. The command in the field numbers 100. Prisoners of war and absent, sick and wounded which latter are daily returning, convalescent amount n
September 20th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 41
s, Mustered out,5 Enlisted men, discharged, exp. of service,90 Killed in action,2 Missing in action,3 Prisoners of war,20 Deserted,5122 Wounded in action,17 While the regiment had been so busily engaged, the following self-explanatory orders were issued, which reflected much credit upon this command: Headquarters 2ND Army Corps, Sept. 19th, 1864. Circular Division commanders will send in as early as practicable requisitions for Spencer rifles to arm one or two good regiments in each division. By command of Major General Hancock, Signed, William Wilson, A. A. A. G. Headquarters 2ND Div. 2ND Army Corps. Sept. 20th, 1864. Official. The First Delaware Volunteers and the 19th Massachusetts Volunteers are hereby designated as the regiments to bear the above arm. The commanders of the above named regiments will at once send in requisitions for the same. By order of Col. Thos. A. Smythe, Commanding Division, Signed, A. Henry Embler, Capt. &. A. A. A. G.
September 19th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 41
fficers, On detached service,4 With leave,1 Sick,712 Enlisted men, on detached service,30 Sick,265 In arrest,2297 Loss: Commissioned officers, Mustered out,5 Enlisted men, discharged, exp. of service,90 Killed in action,2 Missing in action,3 Prisoners of war,20 Deserted,5122 Wounded in action,17 While the regiment had been so busily engaged, the following self-explanatory orders were issued, which reflected much credit upon this command: Headquarters 2ND Army Corps, Sept. 19th, 1864. Circular Division commanders will send in as early as practicable requisitions for Spencer rifles to arm one or two good regiments in each division. By command of Major General Hancock, Signed, William Wilson, A. A. A. G. Headquarters 2ND Div. 2ND Army Corps. Sept. 20th, 1864. Official. The First Delaware Volunteers and the 19th Massachusetts Volunteers are hereby designated as the regiments to bear the above arm. The commanders of the above named regiments will
Chapter 41: reorganization. The engagement at deep Bottom and Ream's Station. From the 23rd of June until July 26th, the regiment, composed of those who had escaped capture, returned convalescents and recruits from depot were reorganized by First. Lieut. Wm. F. Rice, of Brighton, the senior officer left for duty, under whose command it performed much arduous and important work, and was exposed many days. Advantage was taken of the little time not consumed in the above fatigue duties, in drilling the recruits, who were brought up to a good degree of efficiency under the above-named officer's supervision. Here 62 more recruits were received from the depot. At 4 P. M. on the 26th of July, the regiment under orders with the brigade, took up the line of march to the Appomattox, which was crossed on pontoons at 11 P. M. of that night, and continued on until 9 A. M. of the following morning (July 27), crossing the James at Deep Bottom at the above hour, and halted in the breastwor
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