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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865. Search the whole document.

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Sandy Hook, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 8: the siege of Yorktown. On Monday, March 24, the regiment left Boliver Heights at 7.30 A. M. for Harper's Ferry to join General McClellan's army, en route for the Peninsula. After two hours of tedious waiting at the Ferry, they crossed the river on single planks, placed end to end, along the railroad bridge just completed. On reaching Sandy Hook on the Maryland side, the men waited in the cold until 10 P. M. before the train arrived and when it came they beheld the freight cars as friends in which they had travelled before. The officers, however, rejoiced in a passenger car. After a tedious night's ride, the regiment reached Washington on March 25 and occupied the same Soldier's Rest as was provided on its first arrival at the Capitol in August, 1861, but the lodging, this time, was inside, instead of outside the building. In the morning of Wednesday they marched to a campground in the environs and during the brief stay there were much complimented for their exc
Point Lookout, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Avenue, amid clouds of dust, to the foot of Sixth Street, where it embarked upon the transport, North America for Fortress Monroe. On account of a sudden storm which came up just as the boat left the Potomac River, the vessel put back behind Point Lookout to avoid being swamped. The boat was very leaky, old and unseaworthy, and narrowly escaped wreck. The men were crowded between the decks like cattle and the brief experience on shipboard was very trying. At Point Lookout the regiment debPoint Lookout the regiment debarked and remained on shore over night, the Non-Coms being placed in a tworoom cottage, while the men found quarters in the deserted Point Lookout Hotel. There were many evidences of the popularity of the hotel in the days that had passed, and a number of tickets for a Grand Hop were found and kept as souvenirs. Re-embarking on the following morning, the regiment reached Fortress Monroe at 9 P. M. that evening, March 30, and disembarked in the morning, marching over execrable roads into
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ial Order, placed in charge of 3000 men, who worked day and night in the erection of the batteries and redoubts for the reduction of the works in front of the division. The enemy's position extended across the Peninsula from Yorktown, on the York River, to Warwick, on Warwick Creek, a small stream which emptied into the James. From the natural defence of this creek, which they had dammed at Winn's Mills and Lee's Mills, and the conformity of the flooded land in that vicinity, the enemy were, by a comparatively short line of works, able to command all the roads up the Peninsula leading to Richmond. They also held Gloucester, opposite Yorktown, on the eastern side of the York River, where the banks of that stream approach and form a narrow strait. McClellan reported that the position of the enemy is a strong one. From present indications their fortifications extend some two miles in length and mount heavy guns. The ground in front of their heavier guns is low and swampy, makin
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 8: the siege of Yorktown. On Monday, March 24, the regiment left Boliver Heights at 7.30 A. M. f to be ready the next morning for the advance upon Yorktown. The soldiers were ordered to prepare five day's body of the troops advanced by the direct route to Yorktown. General Morrill's Brigade and General Hamilton's a plain about two miles from the enemy's works at Yorktown. A sharp artillery duel followed. Here army lifehird Corps was charged with the operations against Yorktown itself. Sedgwick's Division held the line along tnemy's position extended across the Peninsula from Yorktown, on the York River, to Warwick, on Warwick Creek, to Richmond. They also held Gloucester, opposite Yorktown, on the eastern side of the York River, where the itched within two miles of the enemy's outworks of Yorktown on a level plain, and was called, Camp Winfield Sce places. Capt. Harry Hale, during the siege of Yorktown, had a colored servant who bore the familiar name
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ickets for a Grand Hop were found and kept as souvenirs. Re-embarking on the following morning, the regiment reached Fortress Monroe at 9 P. M. that evening, March 30, and disembarked in the morning, marching over execrable roads into camp at Hampton. This place had been burned by the rebels, and nothing but chimneys were left to show its site. A large army had already assembled at Hampton and the practical formation of the Army of the Potomac took place there. The Nineteenth MassachusettHampton and the practical formation of the Army of the Potomac took place there. The Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment was made a part of the First Brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. N. J. T. Dana; of the Second Division, commanded by Brig. Gen. John Sedgwick; of the Second Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. E. V. Sumner. The two other Brigades of the Division were commanded by Brig. Gen. Gorman and Brig. Gen. Burns. Camp was pitched here as though a long stay was to be made, the men being quartered in Sibley tents, it being the first time they had been thus housed. Thereafter, only shelter tents were
North America (search for this): chapter 8
t arrival at the Capitol in August, 1861, but the lodging, this time, was inside, instead of outside the building. In the morning of Wednesday they marched to a campground in the environs and during the brief stay there were much complimented for their excellent discipline, exemplary conduct, correct drill and fine parade. On March 27, at 5.30 P. M. the regiment marched down Pennsylvania Avenue, amid clouds of dust, to the foot of Sixth Street, where it embarked upon the transport, North America for Fortress Monroe. On account of a sudden storm which came up just as the boat left the Potomac River, the vessel put back behind Point Lookout to avoid being swamped. The boat was very leaky, old and unseaworthy, and narrowly escaped wreck. The men were crowded between the decks like cattle and the brief experience on shipboard was very trying. At Point Lookout the regiment debarked and remained on shore over night, the Non-Coms being placed in a tworoom cottage, while the men f
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 8: the siege of Yorktown. On Monday, March 24, the regiment left Boliver Heights at 7.30 A. M. for Harper's Ferry to join General McClellan's army, en route for the Peninsula. After two hours of tedious waiting at the Ferry, they crossed the river on single planks, placed end to end, along the railroad bridge just completed. On reaching Sandy Hook on the Maryland side, the men waited in the cold until 10 P. M. before the train arrived and when it came they beheld the freight cars as friends in which they had travelled before. The officers, however, rejoiced in a passenger car. After a tedious night's ride, the regiment reached Washington on March 25 and occupied the same Soldier's Rest as was provided on its first arrival at the Capitol in August, 1861, but the lodging, this time, was inside, instead of outside the building. In the morning of Wednesday they marched to a campground in the environs and during the brief stay there were much complimented for their exc
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
cipline, exemplary conduct, correct drill and fine parade. On March 27, at 5.30 P. M. the regiment marched down Pennsylvania Avenue, amid clouds of dust, to the foot of Sixth Street, where it embarked upon the transport, North America for Fortress Monroe. On account of a sudden storm which came up just as the boat left the Potomac River, the vessel put back behind Point Lookout to avoid being swamped. The boat was very leaky, old and unseaworthy, and narrowly escaped wreck. The men were cLookout Hotel. There were many evidences of the popularity of the hotel in the days that had passed, and a number of tickets for a Grand Hop were found and kept as souvenirs. Re-embarking on the following morning, the regiment reached Fortress Monroe at 9 P. M. that evening, March 30, and disembarked in the morning, marching over execrable roads into camp at Hampton. This place had been burned by the rebels, and nothing but chimneys were left to show its site. A large army had already
Gloucester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
f the works in front of the division. The enemy's position extended across the Peninsula from Yorktown, on the York River, to Warwick, on Warwick Creek, a small stream which emptied into the James. From the natural defence of this creek, which they had dammed at Winn's Mills and Lee's Mills, and the conformity of the flooded land in that vicinity, the enemy were, by a comparatively short line of works, able to command all the roads up the Peninsula leading to Richmond. They also held Gloucester, opposite Yorktown, on the eastern side of the York River, where the banks of that stream approach and form a narrow strait. McClellan reported that the position of the enemy is a strong one. From present indications their fortifications extend some two miles in length and mount heavy guns. The ground in front of their heavier guns is low and swampy, making it utterly impassable. The first camp of shelter tents was pitched within two miles of the enemy's outworks of Yorktown on a l
Alexandria (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
building. In the morning of Wednesday they marched to a campground in the environs and during the brief stay there were much complimented for their excellent discipline, exemplary conduct, correct drill and fine parade. On March 27, at 5.30 P. M. the regiment marched down Pennsylvania Avenue, amid clouds of dust, to the foot of Sixth Street, where it embarked upon the transport, North America for Fortress Monroe. On account of a sudden storm which came up just as the boat left the Potomac River, the vessel put back behind Point Lookout to avoid being swamped. The boat was very leaky, old and unseaworthy, and narrowly escaped wreck. The men were crowded between the decks like cattle and the brief experience on shipboard was very trying. At Point Lookout the regiment debarked and remained on shore over night, the Non-Coms being placed in a tworoom cottage, while the men found quarters in the deserted Point Lookout Hotel. There were many evidences of the popularity of the
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