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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865. Search the whole document.

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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ith better precision than drill,—all dodging together. They did not think at such times that the sound followed the missile, and if they were to be hit at all, it would be before they could have the opportunity of hearing it. During the stay of the regiment in front of Yorktown, Adjt. John C. Chadwick returned to it, having been relieved of his duties as Acting Assistant Adjutant General of Dana's Brigade, and First Lieut. Moncena Dunn, of Company D, returned from recruiting duty in Massachusetts, together with First Lieut. James H. Rice, of Company F. In Company C, Capt. J. Scott Todd resigned, and First Lieut. George W. Bachelder was made Captain, Second Lieut. J. G. C. Dodge, of Company F being made First Lieutenant and transferred to fill the vacancy. Capt. James D. Russell, of Company D, was detailed for special duty on the fortifications and First Lieut. Edward P. Bishop, of Company K, was detailed as Aide-de-Camp on the staff of Brig. Gen. Dana. Sergt. William H. Hill,
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
I shall push the enemy to the wall, he declared in his official despatch, and acting in accordance with these energetic words, he rapidly embarked Franklin's Division of the Corps and other troops on transport and sent them up the York River to West Point, with a view of flanking the enemy on their retreat toward Richmond, and thus co-operating with the immediately pursuing force, already sent by land. The defences the enemy had evacuated were reported by the engineers as being very strong anuses, leaning in all directions and looking as if a first class hurricane had passed that way. At 3 P. M. the regiment embarked on the transport C. Vanderbilt and started up the York River, preceded by the gunboat Marblehead. They arrived at West Point at 6 P. M., but did not debark until the following morning, when they were poled ashore in pontoon boats and formed in column by division closed in mass, Colonel Hinks commanding the Brigade. A line of battle had already been formed and was j
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
om Battery No. 1 at the mouth of Wormsley's Creek and was aimed at the enemy's shipping in the York River beyond Yorktown and Gloucester. They replied with their large pivot gun, a rifled 68 pounder,pporting them by a considerable body of infantry, and he ordered the fleet of gun boats up the York River. I shall push the enemy to the wall, he declared in his official despatch, and acting in acy embarked Franklin's Division of the Corps and other troops on transport and sent them up the York River to West Point, with a view of flanking the enemy on their retreat toward Richmond, and thus co across, extended for miles. The water battery mounted a long row of pieces and commanded the York River at this point, co-operating with the batteries at Gloucester Point opposite. While the regihat way. At 3 P. M. the regiment embarked on the transport C. Vanderbilt and started up the York River, preceded by the gunboat Marblehead. They arrived at West Point at 6 P. M., but did not debark
Gloucester Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
When the men awoke in the morning, however, it was discovered that some of these barrels contained gunpowder and they were immediately rolled into the water, that being considered the best place for them. The fortifications of Yorktown were found to be on a grand scale. The parapets were 20 and 30 feet high, and ditches, 20 feet across, extended for miles. The water battery mounted a long row of pieces and commanded the York River at this point, co-operating with the batteries at Gloucester Point opposite. While the regiment was encamped on the beach at Yorktown, many of the men took occasion to go into the town. All that was left there was a church and a half dozen tumbled down wooden houses, leaning in all directions and looking as if a first class hurricane had passed that way. At 3 P. M. the regiment embarked on the transport C. Vanderbilt and started up the York River, preceded by the gunboat Marblehead. They arrived at West Point at 6 P. M., but did not debark until
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
march to Yorktown. Rain fell throughout the day. The mud was ankle deep and the soil was so full of clay and so sticky that it was extremely hard for the men to move along, their feet sticking in the mud at every step. Shoes were pulled off by it, and the men were greatly exhausted. Despite their misery, some one in the regiment struck up an army song. It was taken up along the line and in a few minutes it seemed as if the whole army was singing. At noon the regiment arrived before Norfolk, and the shelter tents were pitched. In the distance stretched the long fortifications of Yorktown. Immediately in front was the breastwork which Washington built to protect his troops; and fifty yards further away was the spot where he had received Cornwallis' sword, 81 years previously, the monument being broken in places where the rebels had knocked off pieces for souvenirs. Near the spot where the regiment halted at noon was seen the monster balloon McClellan which had been used to
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ng to Yorktown was crowded with cavalry, artillery and baggage wagons. The firing of the gunboats, as they poured shot and shell into the flank of the retreating foe, and the sounds of distant musketry, made the whole scenery and suggestion martial in the extreme. At 6 P. M., in the midst of a smart shower, the regiment took up its tents and began to march again. The roads were quagmires and constantly grew worse. The march was frequently interrupted to allow columns to pass toward Williamsburg, in direct pursuit of the enemy. No sooner was the command Forward given than Halt would follow and the men would drop their pieces to the ground in disgust. It was impossible to sit down because of the mud and water, it was irksome to stand, and as the men scuffed along in the brief periods of marching, they slid first to one side, then to the other in the mud. Wagons broke down, horses stuck in the mud, and, taken altogether the delay was such that in eight hours during the night, the
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Chapter 9: the evacuation of Yorktown. McClellan's pursuit. Lieut. Jeff Hazard, of the Rhode During the stay of the regiment in front of Yorktown, Adjt. John C. Chadwick returned to it, havina rifled 68 pounder, mounted on the height of Yorktown. The cannonade was kept up on both sides fort 9.00 A. M. the regiment began the march to Yorktown. Rain fell throughout the day. The mud was adistance stretched the long fortifications of Yorktown. Immediately in front was the breastwork whiy it was noticed to suddenly move away toward Yorktown. Soon the enemy began to fire upon it. Then ines without injury. Every road leading to Yorktown was crowded with cavalry, artillery and baggathe line finally halted on the sandy beach at Yorktown and the men were almost immediately asleep. best place for them. The fortifications of Yorktown were found to be on a grand scale. The parapile the regiment was encamped on the beach at Yorktown, many of the men took occasion to go into the[3 more...]
Gloucester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
works. If this is so, they have only done it to draw us into a trap, or to get where they can have better chance at us. After three weeks laborious preparation, General McClellan having advanced his parallels, got one of his large siege batteries in position and opened fire at a distance of two miles upon the enemy's works (Apr. 30.) The first shot was fired from Battery No. 1 at the mouth of Wormsley's Creek and was aimed at the enemy's shipping in the York River beyond Yorktown and Gloucester. They replied with their large pivot gun, a rifled 68 pounder, mounted on the height of Yorktown. The cannonade was kept up on both sides for about two hours, in the course of which about sixty shots were fired from the one and two hundred pounder Parrott guns of the heavy siege battery. During the night, the enemy kept up a brisk fire of shells upon the parallels where the men were at work. On the next morning the enemy opened fire with their Columbiade, mounted on the heights of Y
John C. Chadwick (search for this): chapter 9
es of the Union guns. It was always interesting to notice the men of the army whenever a Rebel shell came their way. It was impossible to resist the inclination to dodge it, and the men could do this with better precision than drill,—all dodging together. They did not think at such times that the sound followed the missile, and if they were to be hit at all, it would be before they could have the opportunity of hearing it. During the stay of the regiment in front of Yorktown, Adjt. John C. Chadwick returned to it, having been relieved of his duties as Acting Assistant Adjutant General of Dana's Brigade, and First Lieut. Moncena Dunn, of Company D, returned from recruiting duty in Massachusetts, together with First Lieut. James H. Rice, of Company F. In Company C, Capt. J. Scott Todd resigned, and First Lieut. George W. Bachelder was made Captain, Second Lieut. J. G. C. Dodge, of Company F being made First Lieutenant and transferred to fill the vacancy. Capt. James D. Russel
James H. Rice (search for this): chapter 9
l dodging together. They did not think at such times that the sound followed the missile, and if they were to be hit at all, it would be before they could have the opportunity of hearing it. During the stay of the regiment in front of Yorktown, Adjt. John C. Chadwick returned to it, having been relieved of his duties as Acting Assistant Adjutant General of Dana's Brigade, and First Lieut. Moncena Dunn, of Company D, returned from recruiting duty in Massachusetts, together with First Lieut. James H. Rice, of Company F. In Company C, Capt. J. Scott Todd resigned, and First Lieut. George W. Bachelder was made Captain, Second Lieut. J. G. C. Dodge, of Company F being made First Lieutenant and transferred to fill the vacancy. Capt. James D. Russell, of Company D, was detailed for special duty on the fortifications and First Lieut. Edward P. Bishop, of Company K, was detailed as Aide-de-Camp on the staff of Brig. Gen. Dana. Sergt. William H. Hill, of Company F, was promoted to be Se
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