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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General .. Search the whole document.

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Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
Chapter 25: The journey resumed. a midnight pursuit. a brave woman. a deadly encounter. Scobell Defends himself. death of a rebel spy. While these events were occurring, General McClellan was advancing up the Peninsula towards Richmond. Yorktown had surrendered, the battle of Williamsburg had been fought, and the army was advancing to the Chickahominy. Mrs. Lawton and John Scobell had been for some weeks in Richmond, during which time they had obtained much important information, Mrs. Lawton taking the role of a Southern lady from Corinth, Mississippi, and Scobell acting as her servant. Having determined to leave Richmond, they were on their way to join the Union forces, which, under General McClellan, had their headquarters on the Chickahominy at a point about ten miles from Wilson's Landing. Here, according to previous arrangement, they were to meet Mr. Lawton, who was also one of my operatives, and from that point were to proceed to the Union camp. The
Corinth (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
ave woman. a deadly encounter. Scobell Defends himself. death of a rebel spy. While these events were occurring, General McClellan was advancing up the Peninsula towards Richmond. Yorktown had surrendered, the battle of Williamsburg had been fought, and the army was advancing to the Chickahominy. Mrs. Lawton and John Scobell had been for some weeks in Richmond, during which time they had obtained much important information, Mrs. Lawton taking the role of a Southern lady from Corinth, Mississippi, and Scobell acting as her servant. Having determined to leave Richmond, they were on their way to join the Union forces, which, under General McClellan, had their headquarters on the Chickahominy at a point about ten miles from Wilson's Landing. Here, according to previous arrangement, they were to meet Mr. Lawton, who was also one of my operatives, and from that point were to proceed to the Union camp. The landlady of the Glen House was a stanch friend to the Federals, and had
Glendale, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
the night before and had informed Mrs. Braxton, the landlady, that these parties would take that route from Richmond-and had left a note to be delivered to Mrs. Lawton, which contained instructions of her future line of travel. The trip from Glendale was one attended with great risk, as the country, on that side of the river, was filled with the scouts of both armies, and if captured by the rebel scouts or pickets, the chances were that detection would be followed by serious consequences. Aer of the room he saw the pack and several articles that had been worn by the peddler, which left no further room for doubt in his mind as to the character of the individual he had been watching for so long a time. He accordingly set out for Glendale, where he arrived just as the sun was sinking behind the western horizon. He narrated the particulars of his chase to Mrs. Lawton, who as convinced that the peddler was a rebel spy; but the question was-Was he upon their track? Did he suspect
John Scobell (search for this): chapter 26
ing to the Chickahominy. Mrs. Lawton and John Scobell had been for some weeks in Richmond, duringd fell from their saddles. At 'em! hissed Scobell, through his clenched teeth, as he plunged thance away. Lay low to your saddle! cried Scobell to his companion, and turn your horse as far nable to lessen the distance between them. Scobell several times ventured a look over his shouldumbling, fell heavily to the ground, throwing Scobell over his head and into the ditch. Scramblihe opposite direction, while the bullets from Scobell's weapon whistled in dangerously close proximity to his ears. Scobell, seeing that three of the pursuers were either dead or badly wounded, pas they came up, are you hurt? No, replied Scobell. What has become of your assailants? T answered Scobell. You are a brave fellow, Scobell, said the Captain of the squad, coming forwarn. Stuart's Cavalry. Mr. and Mrs. Lawton and Scobell soon afterwards returned to Washington, where[15 more...]
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 26
Chapter 25: The journey resumed. a midnight pursuit. a brave woman. a deadly encounter. Scobell Defends himself. death of a rebel spy. While these events were occurring, General McClellan was advancing up the Peninsula towards Richmond. Yorktown had surrendered, the battle of Williamsburg had been fought, and the army was advancing to the Chickahominy. Mrs. Lawton and John Scobell had been for some weeks in Richmond, during which time they had obtained much important information, Mrs. Lawton taking the role of a Southern lady from Corinth, Mississippi, and Scobell acting as her servant. Having determined to leave Richmond, they were on their way to join the Union forces, which, under General McClellan, had their headquarters on the Chickahominy at a point about ten miles from Wilson's Landing. Here, according to previous arrangement, they were to meet Mr. Lawton, who was also one of my operatives, and from that point were to proceed to the Union camp. Th
Carrie Lawton (search for this): chapter 26
ing up the Peninsula towards Richmond. Yorktown had surrendered, the battle of Williamsburg had been fought, and the army was advancing to the Chickahominy. Mrs. Lawton and John Scobell had been for some weeks in Richmond, during which time they had obtained much important information, Mrs. Lawton taking the role of a Southern Mrs. Lawton taking the role of a Southern lady from Corinth, Mississippi, and Scobell acting as her servant. Having determined to leave Richmond, they were on their way to join the Union forces, which, under General McClellan, had their headquarters on the Chickahominy at a point about ten miles from Wilson's Landing. Here, according to previous arrangement, they were to meet Mr. Lawton, who was also one of my operatives, and from that point were to proceed to the Union camp. The landlady of the Glen House was a stanch friend to the Federals, and had on more than one occasion rendered valuable service to my operatives, especially to Hugh Lawton. It was therefore at his suggestion that his wi
It was subsequently learned that the peddler was a rebel spy, and for some time past had been visiting the Union camps gathering information, which he had no doubt conveyed to the rebels. On his person were found papers which fully confirmed this, and that they failed to reach their destination on account of his death, was a fortunate occurrence for the Union cause. How he had discovered the character of my operatives is a mystery yet unsolved, as his wounded companion, when examined the next day, stated that he had met him that night for the first time, and had at his request accompanied him in the trip which had ended so disastrously. He further stated that his party belonged to a band of independent scouts, which had but lately been attached to Lee's Army, and were assigned to Gen. Stuart's Cavalry. Mr. and Mrs. Lawton and Scobell soon afterwards returned to Washington, where they were allowed to rest themselves for a time before being again called upon. A dead shot.
, who was also one of my operatives, and from that point were to proceed to the Union camp. The landlady of the Glen House was a stanch friend to the Federals, and had on more than one occasion rendered valuable service to my operatives, especially to Hugh Lawton. It was therefore at his suggestion that his wife and Scobell adopted the plan they did to leave Richmond and to reach our lines. As Uncle Gallus had stated, a man had stopped at the tavern the night before and had informed Mrs. Braxton, the landlady, that these parties would take that route from Richmond-and had left a note to be delivered to Mrs. Lawton, which contained instructions of her future line of travel. The trip from Glendale was one attended with great risk, as the country, on that side of the river, was filled with the scouts of both armies, and if captured by the rebel scouts or pickets, the chances were that detection would be followed by serious consequences. Among my female operatives, however, none
It was subsequently learned that the peddler was a rebel spy, and for some time past had been visiting the Union camps gathering information, which he had no doubt conveyed to the rebels. On his person were found papers which fully confirmed this, and that they failed to reach their destination on account of his death, was a fortunate occurrence for the Union cause. How he had discovered the character of my operatives is a mystery yet unsolved, as his wounded companion, when examined the next day, stated that he had met him that night for the first time, and had at his request accompanied him in the trip which had ended so disastrously. He further stated that his party belonged to a band of independent scouts, which had but lately been attached to Lee's Army, and were assigned to Gen. Stuart's Cavalry. Mr. and Mrs. Lawton and Scobell soon afterwards returned to Washington, where they were allowed to rest themselves for a time before being again called upon. A dead shot.
Hugh Lawton (search for this): chapter 26
le service to my operatives, especially to Hugh Lawton. It was therefore at his suggestion that hmond-and had left a note to be delivered to Mrs. Lawton, which contained instructions of her futuree were clearer-headed or more resolute than Mrs. Lawton, who prior to this time had been a most effithstanding our fears to the contrary, said Mrs. Lawton. I dunno about that, replied, Scobell;head. What makes you think so? inquired Mrs. Lawton. Well, I am afraid that confounded peddh. Why, I can manage him myself, laughed Mrs. Lawton, and if that is all you fear, we are perfece he would assuredly prevent the capture of Mrs. Lawton. Leading his horse to the side of the roaring to remount his horse and follow after Mrs. Lawton, when he heard the tramp of horses' feet cowere at their head. Hello, John! exclaimed Lawton, as they came up, are you hurt? No, repliedassigned to Gen. Stuart's Cavalry. Mr. and Mrs. Lawton and Scobell soon afterwards returned to Was[10 more...]