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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General .. Search the whole document.

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Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
the camp, unable to sleep --unable almost to think intelligently; and when morning dawned I was as far from devising any practical plan of relief as when I first received the information. I telegraphed to Captain Milward, Harbor-Master at Fortress Monroe, and in charge of the flag-of-truce boat for exchanging prisoners, asking him to endeavor to ascertain from the Richmond papers, or from any other source, anything definite as to the fate of my unfortunate operatives. Several messages wer system of retaliation which would amply revenge the death of the men now held. Receiving a copy of these instructions, Colonel Key and myself, feeling that we had exhausted the power of the government in this matter, returned at once to Fortress Monroe. We arrived there on the 23d day of April. General Wool was immediately found, and without a moment's delay, he caused the required dispatches to be forwarded, by way of Norfolk, through General Huger, who was then in command of that place,
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
cond day after the appearance of the officer, the court-martial adjourned to Campbell's house, and Scully accompanied them. Seating themselves around the bedside of the invalid, the court was formally opened, and Webster was requested to state what he knew of the antecedents of the accused. Though very weak, and speaking with considerable difficulty, Webster made his statement. He said that he had known John Scully from April, 1861, to the time of his arrest. That the prisoner was in Baltimore when he first met him, and was always in the company of known secessionists, and was considered by them to be a good friend to the South. So far as he had any knowledge of the accused he was what he assumed to be, and that his appearance in Richmond was a surprise to him. He was not known to be in the employ of the government, and Webster had never met him under any circumstances which would indicate that fact. This was all that he could say, and although closely questioned by the pres
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ce of death into execution, the Federal government would initiate a system of retaliation which would amply revenge the death of the men now held. Receiving a copy of these instructions, Colonel Key and myself, feeling that we had exhausted the power of the government in this matter, returned at once to Fortress Monroe. We arrived there on the 23d day of April. General Wool was immediately found, and without a moment's delay, he caused the required dispatches to be forwarded, by way of Norfolk, through General Huger, who was then in command of that place, with the urgent request that he would instantly transmit it by telegraph to the Richmond authorities. This, I learned, was done as had been requested, and I learned further, that it reached the officers of the rebel government, and received their consideration in time to have been of avail, had there been one spark of manly sympathy animating the breasts of those who were the leaders of a vile conspiracy to destroy the nobles
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
tion. An officer appeared in the cell, the paper was produced, and the faithful, brave, true-hearted man was condemned to be hung on the twenty-ninth day of April, but ten days after the approval of his sentence. The Union army was before Yorktown. McClellan had already sustained two serious disappointments, and both of them at the hands of the government at Washington. In the first place, on his arrival at Fort Monroe, he had ascertained that the promised assistance of the navy could s detached from his command, and had been ordered to remain in front of Washington, for the protection of the capital, which was erroneously believed to be in imminent danger of capture by the rebels. These events rendered a scientific siege of Yorktown a necessity; and while engaged in this laborious work, I was in constant consultation with the commanding General. Numerous scouts had been sent out through the rebel country, and the secret service department was taxed to its utmost. George H
from the charge. Anything, however, that General Winder wants from me will be cheerfully given. Merous friends had now almost ceased. From General Winder's officers, with whom he had previously beouse of Mr. Campbell but two days, when one of Winder's men cane to know if Webster was sufficientle matter? she hurriedly ejaculated. One of Winder's men is below, and I fear his presence indicato perform, Mr. Webster. I am directed by General Winder to arrest you, and convey you at once to C This is infamous, exclaimed Webster; what can Winder mean by arresting this woman, and what am I centered the gloomy portals of the jail. General Winder was present when they arrived, and after ae his execution, he requested a visit from General Winder, and that officer, evidently expecting a rhat. I am afraid that cannot be done, said Winder, coldly. It is not much to ask, pleaded Web to go before that. It is the order of General Winder, and I must obey, answered Alexander. You[3 more...]
ough the officers were already here to arrest me. While he yet spoke, there came a knock at the chamber door, which, on being opened, revealed the form of Captain McCubbin. As he entered the room he gazed furtively around, and his salutation to Webster was very different from the cordiality which had marked his previous visiselves from the charge. Anything, however, that General Winder wants from me will be cheerfully given. Mrs. Lawton, will you get the letter, and hand it to Captain McCubbin. There was no tremor of the voice, and the watchful Confederate looked in vain for any evidence of fear in the face of the man, who, stricken by disease a at him. Though the hand of fate was upon him, Webster never lost his heroic courage, and bore the scrutiny of the officer without the quiver of a muscle. Captain McCubbin received the letter, and almost immediately withdrew. As he closed the door behind him, Webster turned to his faithful companion, and, in a low, solemn voic
Chase Morton (search for this): chapter 37
Chapter 36: Webster arrested as a spy. a woman's devotion and a patriot's Heroism. Webster is convicted. the execution. a martyr's grave. After the departure of Lewis and Scully from Webster's room, where they were so closely followed by the Confederate detective and Chase Morton, my trusty operative heard nothing of them for some time. Fearing to make inquiries concerning them, lest he should compromise them still further, as well as bring himself under the suspicion of the rebel authorities, he maintained a strict silence with regard to the movements of his companions. Several days of anxious suspense followed, which, to one in Webster's critical condition, were fraught with agonizing doubts and heartfelt fears for the ultimate safety of himself and his friends. Resolving, however, to utter no word which would compromise them, he bore the solicitude with unmurmuring firmness. Only to the heroic woman, who so faithfully nursed him, did he unburden his mind of t
o improve, and although depressed with fears for the fate of his companions, he gradually became stronger, and was at length able to leave his bed and move about his room. The visits of his numerous friends had now almost ceased. From General Winder's officers, with whom he had previously been so intimate, he heard nothing, nor did they make inquiries about his health, as had been their custom. Of the many friends in private life, who had surrounded him, only two remained. These were Mr. Pierce and Mr. Campbell, with whom Webster had traveled for some time, and his family. This dropping away of old friends, and the breaking up of old associations, was significant to Webster of impending danger. It must be that he, too, was suspected, and that the favor of the rebel authorities had been withdrawn. Day by day, during his convalescence, did the brave little woman who had nursed him back to life, endeavor to encourage him to a hopeful view of his situation, and to impress him w
efore the door. The heavy bolts were shot back, and in the doorway stood Cap-Alexander, the officer in charge. The little clock that ticked upon the wall noted abefore that. It is the order of General Winder, and I must obey, answered Alexander. You must prepare yourself at once. Without another word Webster arose fr I will be brave, and die like a man. Farewell, forever! then turning to Captain Alexander, who stood unmoved near the door, he said: I am ready! As they ad done its worst, and the loyal spy was dead. Early in the afternoon, Captain Alexander returned to the prison, and informed Mrs. Lawton that all was over. He fofficers stood around the coffin. Turning suddenly upon them, and facing Captain Alexander, Mrs. Lawton, in a burst of passion, exclaimed: Murderers! this is l feel it before you die! As if stung to the quick by this accusation, Captain Alexander stepped up to the coffin, and laying his hand upon Webster's cold, white
Carrie Lawton (search for this): chapter 37
Why do you think so? anxiously inquired Mrs. Lawton. Surely they cannot connect you with these er wants from me will be cheerfully given. Mrs. Lawton, will you get the letter, and hand it to Ca of the day. While he lay thus, attended by Mrs. Lawton, Mr. Campbell suddenly entered the room, wiand those orders I must obey. Then, said Mrs. Lawton, I will go too. He needs care and attentioned, and Webster was assisted into it, while Mrs. Lawton, under the escort of Cashmeyer was compellember, they will send the dead here next. Mrs. Lawton was conducted before the General, but she ss a spy. The meeting between Webster and Mrs. Lawton was a most affecting one. Tears filled theat impressed all who witnessed it. Under Mrs. Lawton's direction, the room in which he was confie door, a piercing shriek rent the air, and Mrs. Lawton fell prostrate to the floor. Arriving atody lay, incased in a metallic coffin which Mrs. Lawton had procured. His face was not discolored [19 more...]
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