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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General .. Search the whole document.

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Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
ast to force their retreat to Gordonsville, and then advance upon Richmond, either by way of Fredericksburg or the Peninsula. Burnside, on assuming the command, submitted a plan of his own, which wo make a feint of doing, what McClellan really intended to do, before adopting the move upon Fredericksburg or the Peninsula, and then to advance from Fredericksburg. This plan, however, did not meFredericksburg. This plan, however, did not meet the approval of General Halleck. That General had a long conference with Burnside, at Warrenton. Here their various plans were discussed, without either agreeing to the plan of the other, and thee advance was ordered. The success of this plan depended upon the immediate possession of Fredericksburg by the Federal army. The intelligent student knows full well that this was not even attemptay to have been fatal to his success. There was a time when he could certainly have taken Fredericksburg, with but little loss; but that time was passed when he permitted the enemy to fully garriso
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
ellan could take his choice. One was to advance up the valley of the Shenandoah with reenforcements of fifteen thousand troops, the other was to cross the river between the enemy and Washington, in which case he was be reenforced with thirty thousand men. McClellan's first inclination was to adopt the movement up the Shenandoah Valley, believing, that, if he crossed the river into Virginia, Lee would be enabled to promptly prevent success in that direction by at once throwing his army into Maryland. Owing, however, to the delay of the supplies in reaching the army, it was nearly the end of October before the troops were ready to move. About the twenty-sixth, the army commenced to cross at Harper's Ferry, and by the sixth of November the advance upon the enemy was begun. On the night of the seventh, therefore, when the order came relieving him from the command, McClellan's advance guard was actually engaged with the enemy. I had already learned that Longstreet was immediately in
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
east to force their retreat to Gordonsville, and then advance upon Richmond, either by way of Fredericksburg or the Peninsula. Burnside, on assuming the command, submitted a plan of his own, which was to make a feint of doing, what McClellan really intended to do, before adopting the move upon Fredericksburg or the Peninsula, and then to advance from Fredericksburg. This plan, however, did not meet the approval of General Halleck. That General had a long conference with Burnside, at Warrenton. Here their various plans were discussed, without either agreeing to the plan of the other, and the matter was finally referred to the President for his decision. After a further delay of several days, Mr. Lincoln adopted Burnside's plan, and the advance was ordered. The success of this plan depended upon the immediate possession of Fredericksburg by the Federal army. The intelligent student knows full well that this was not even attempted until Lee had ample time to heavily re-enfor
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 39
the army under its new commander, I was afterwards employed by the government in the work of investigating the numerous claims that were presented against the United States. While acting in this capacity, I was instrumental in unearthing a vast number of fraudulent claims, and, in bringing to justice a large number of men who werds which were sought to he perpetrated against the government in that region of the country. In 1865, I severed my connection with the Secret service of the United States, and returned to Chicago, where I have since been engaged in the active prosecution of my profession as a detective. Very often, as I sit in the twilight, mwork of years. The war is over, the rebellion has been crushed, peace and plenty are everywhere apparent. The flag of the Union floats from every port in the United States, the slave is free, the South is recovering from the ravages of war, and the stories of those stirring times seem now like the legends of an olden time. O
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
tly a requiem for the dead. Around us, sleeping the sleep that knows no waking, lie the forms of those whom we knew and loved. We are in the city of the dead. The wind sighs through the waving branches of the trees, with a mournful melody, suggestive of the place. Near by is the bustling city, but here we are surrounded only by the mute, though eloquent testimonies of man's eternal rest. Here beneath a drooping willow let us pause awhile. Flowers are blooming over a mound of earth, saturating the atmosphere with a grateful aroma. Let us lean over while we read what is inscribed upon the marble tablet. Sacred to the memory of Timothy Webster, who was executed as a spy, by the rebels, in Richmond, Va., April 29, 1862, after gallant service in the war of the Rebellion. he sealed his fidelity and devotion to his country with his blood. Alike to him are the heats of summer, or the snows of winter. Peacefully and quietly he sleeps. The Spy of the Rebellion is at rest.
Chester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
it was nearly the end of October before the troops were ready to move. About the twenty-sixth, the army commenced to cross at Harper's Ferry, and by the sixth of November the advance upon the enemy was begun. On the night of the seventh, therefore, when the order came relieving him from the command, McClellan's advance guard was actually engaged with the enemy. I had already learned that Longstreet was immediately in our front, near Culpepper, while Jackson and Hill's forces were near Chester's and Thornton's Gap, west of the Blue Ridge. McClellan had formed the plan of attempting to divide the enemy, with the hope of forcing him to battle, when it was believed, an easy victory would be achieved. At this juncture, however, and when the army was in an excellent condition to fight a great battle, when officers and men were enthusiastic in their hopes of being able soon to strike an effective blow, McClellan was removed, and Stanton had, at last, accomplished his revenge, Not o
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
e base attempt to swindle and defraud the nation in the dark hours of her need and peril. In the Spring of 1864, I was transfered to the Department of the Mississippi, under General Canby, and my headquarters were located at New Orleans. Here I was engaged in looking after cotton claims, and the frauds which were sought to he perpetrated against the government in that region of the country. In 1865, I severed my connection with the Secret service of the United States, and returned to Chicago, where I have since been engaged in the active prosecution of my profession as a detective. Very often, as I sit in the twilight, my mind reverts back to those stirring scenes of by-gone days; to those years of war and its consequent hardships, and I recall with pleasure my own connection with the suppression of the rebellion. My subsequent life has been none the less happy because of my having assisted, as best as I could, in putting down that gigantic act of attempted disunion, and i
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
e he was be reenforced with thirty thousand men. McClellan's first inclination was to adopt the movement up the Shenandoah Valley, believing, that, if he crossed the river into Virginia, Lee would be enabled to promptly prevent success in that direction by at once throwing his army into Maryland. Owing, however, to the delay of the supplies in reaching the army, it was nearly the end of October before the troops were ready to move. About the twenty-sixth, the army commenced to cross at Harper's Ferry, and by the sixth of November the advance upon the enemy was begun. On the night of the seventh, therefore, when the order came relieving him from the command, McClellan's advance guard was actually engaged with the enemy. I had already learned that Longstreet was immediately in our front, near Culpepper, while Jackson and Hill's forces were near Chester's and Thornton's Gap, west of the Blue Ridge. McClellan had formed the plan of attempting to divide the enemy, with the hope of fo
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 39
ember, following the battle of Antietam, General McClellan was removed from the command of the Armyf the Potomac, and this time effectually. McClellan's tardiness was the alleged cause of his rem, an absolute necessity. In the language of McClellan, The army had need of rest. After the terri-in-Chief, had submitted two plans, of which McClellan could take his choice. One was to advance u was be reenforced with thirty thousand men. McClellan's first inclination was to adopt the movemene order came relieving him from the command, McClellan's advance guard was actually engaged with thand Thornton's Gap, west of the Blue Ridge. McClellan had formed the plan of attempting to divide great and decisively victorious campaign. McClellan's plan on discovering the position of the engovernment, ceased. Upon the removal of General McClellan, I declined to act any further in the cages. My deep admiration, therefore, for General McClellan, was the result of my knowledge, of my i[2 more...]
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 39
rowing his army into Maryland. Owing, however, to the delay of the supplies in reaching the army, it was nearly the end of October before the troops were ready to move. About the twenty-sixth, the army commenced to cross at Harper's Ferry, and by the sixth of November the advance upon the enemy was begun. On the night of the seventh, therefore, when the order came relieving him from the command, McClellan's advance guard was actually engaged with the enemy. I had already learned that Longstreet was immediately in our front, near Culpepper, while Jackson and Hill's forces were near Chester's and Thornton's Gap, west of the Blue Ridge. McClellan had formed the plan of attempting to divide the enemy, with the hope of forcing him to battle, when it was believed, an easy victory would be achieved. At this juncture, however, and when the army was in an excellent condition to fight a great battle, when officers and men were enthusiastic in their hopes of being able soon to strike an
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