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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1. Search the whole document.

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Caloosahatchee (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
k watching the new scenes as we sped along southward. We never went out of sight of the pretty coast line. The This steamer, named The Fashion, had subsequent to this a most remarkable career, ending up as an ironclad in the Confederate Navy. land presented a variety of colors bordered all along with the white streak of the sandy beach, and was quietly beautiful though without a single elevation in view. By one o'clock we were at Punta Rassa, a military post at the mouth of the Caloosahatchee River. Here was stationed one company of the Fifth Infantry, Captain N. B. Rossell in command. What I remember particularly about Punta Rassa is that the forests came down very near to the mouth of the river, and that the mosquitoes were more abundant and of a larger size than any I had ever seen before. They were so greedy that they attacked not only the soldiers but the animals; the dogs would run out into the water of the bay to escape from them. We ascended the river in a small bo
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
left Tampa August 20th, going north by the ordinary stage route, reaching Palatka the 23d. At Palatka, to my delight, I found a new steamer called the Everglade, instead of the old General Clinch, which had taken several days to bring me from Savannah to Palatka. The Everglade had modern conveniences, so that the numerous passengers, many of them army officers changing station or going on leave, had a short and delightful passage down the St. John's River and up the coast to Savannah. By FrSavannah. By Friday, the 28th, I was in Washington and visited the office of our Chief of Ordnance. By September 9th I was speeding away from the capital northward. Some accident to a train ahead of me hindered our baggage so that I could not get my trunk Saturday night or Sunday morning, and had to borrow clothing of Cousin Frank Sargent to attend church. This was at Brooklyn, but I managed to go on to Boston Monday night, an aunt and cousin with me, having taken the steamer by the Stonington route, so tha
Watervliet (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
gton and visited the office of our Chief of Ordnance. By September 9th I was speeding away from the capital northward. Some accident to a train ahead of me hindered our baggage so that I could not get my trunk Saturday night or Sunday morning, and had to borrow clothing of Cousin Frank Sargent to attend church. This was at Brooklyn, but I managed to go on to Boston Monday night, an aunt and cousin with me, having taken the steamer by the Stonington route, so that not till Tuesday afternoon did I meet my family at Lewiston, Me. Guy was then a little lad of a year and eight months, and Grace a babe in the cradle. A homecoming after that first separation at Watervliet and long absence was delightful, indeed. It was not necessary for me to be at West Point this year till the latter part of September, so that I had quite a vacation and very delightful visits with my family and friends before I reported, in accordance with instructions, to the superintendent of the Military Academy.
Turquie (Turkey) (search for this): chapter 1.7
y our regular officers: We haven't lost any Indians. Of course, however, they did their duty, but without much ardor or enthusiasm. It was not the case, however, with the volunteers. They usually had well-selected officers, but the majority of the companies were made up of the roughest element. Very often they would involve in their attacks Indian men, women, and children and take very few prisoners. As far as the Indians were concerned, they behaved very much like the Bashi-bazouks of Turkey. Our department commander did not like the reports that came from this rough campaigning and he made up his mind to try hard to secure some sort of peace with the few remaining Indians in Florida. One day in June Colonel Loomis sent for me and told me that he wanted me to go as a peace commissioner to the Indians in the Everglades, and explain to them how easy and advantageous it would be for them to submit to the Government and end the war. If possible I was to find Chief Billy-Bowlegs
Tampa (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
ree successive days and nights from Palatka to Tampa, I arrived at Fort Brooke and found several ofFort Brooke and found several officers of General W. S. Harney's command out in the offing of Tampa Bay, and ready to start southwae next morning we left Fort Myers to return to Tampa. In the small boat were General Harney, Capta a separate office far from the garrison of Fort Brooke, but on its grounds. One of the buildings ic house at which all the officers who were in Tampa without their families boarded. It was calledactivity in operations in every direction from Tampa as a center, Harney asked to be relieved, and buried in the little cemetery close at hand. Tampa was a field for selfdenial and Christian work.o much for a complete recovery. Before I left Tampa he died and received a soldier's burial. Tanstituted an epoch in the religious history of Tampa to which evangelists in writing and speaking huperintendent of the Military Academy. I left Tampa August 20th, going north by the ordinary stage[5 more...]
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
gton and visited the office of our Chief of Ordnance. By September 9th I was speeding away from the capital northward. Some accident to a train ahead of me hindered our baggage so that I could not get my trunk Saturday night or Sunday morning, and had to borrow clothing of Cousin Frank Sargent to attend church. This was at Brooklyn, but I managed to go on to Boston Monday night, an aunt and cousin with me, having taken the steamer by the Stonington route, so that not till Tuesday afternoon did I meet my family at Lewiston, Me. Guy was then a little lad of a year and eight months, and Grace a babe in the cradle. A homecoming after that first separation at Watervliet and long absence was delightful, indeed. It was not necessary for me to be at West Point this year till the latter part of September, so that I had quite a vacation and very delightful visits with my family and friends before I reported, in accordance with instructions, to the superintendent of the Military Academy.
Fort Myers (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
rm as that of a summer evening in the highlands of the Hudson. General Harney, the department commander, was then at Fort Myers and wished me to report to him there. The steamer swayed back and forth, tugging at her anchor, and, weary as I was, Ioff in a skiff. Against a head wind we made our way, and at last, between eight and nine o'clock at night, landed at Fort Myers. How kind the officers were in those days to one another I Lieutenant W. W. Burns, though he had never seen me before,to improve his administration of affairs, whether commanding an expedition or a department. The next morning we left Fort Myers to return to Tampa. In the small boat were General Harney, Captain Pleasonton, Dr. McLaren, the surgeon, eight soldier him to take his tribe and join the remainder of his people in the Far West. I undertook the mission, first going to Fort Myers and getting the interpreter, Natto Joe, and an Indian woman with her child, who was still detained at that post. This
Lewiston, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
ton and visited the office of our Chief of Ordnance. By September 9th I was speeding away from the capital northward. Some accident to a train ahead of me hindered our baggage so that I could not get my trunk Saturday night or Sunday morning, and had to borrow clothing of Cousin Frank Sargent to attend church. This was at Brooklyn, but I managed to go on to Boston Monday night, an aunt and cousin with me, having taken the steamer by the Stonington route, so that not till Tuesday afternoon did I meet my family at Lewiston, Me. Guy was then a little lad of a year and eight months, and Grace a babe in the cradle. A homecoming after that first separation at Watervliet and long absence was delightful, indeed. It was not necessary for me to be at West Point this year till the latter part of September, so that I had quite a vacation and very delightful visits with my family and friends before I reported, in accordance with instructions, to the superintendent of the Military Academy.
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
were helpful in the care of the poor fellows who were prostrated with malarial fever. Many died and were buried in the little cemetery close at hand. Tampa was a field for selfdenial and Christian work. Hazzard at one time took me to task in a jocose manner and pointed out to me in his scholarly way certain discrepancies in the Bible and asked me how I accounted for them. I answered him that I could not then tell, but perhaps I might be able to explain them at some future time. At Yorktown, during our Civil War, Hazzard and I were walking together back of McClellan's works when a single round shot came rolling along the road and I thought I could strike it with my foot, but Hazzard cried out, It is going too fast! and pulled me back. At that time even he was asking me to explain to him how to become a Christian and get such peace as he thought that I had obtained. Of course I explained the matter to him as well as I could. It was not very long after that before one of tho
Palatka (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
oles After the most fatiguing ride through the sand and over palmetto roots for three successive days and nights from Palatka to Tampa, I arrived at Fort Brooke and found several officers of General W. S. Harney's command out in the offing of Tamthe superintendent of the Military Academy. I left Tampa August 20th, going north by the ordinary stage route, reaching Palatka the 23d. At Palatka, to my delight, I found a new steamer called the Everglade, instead of the old General Clinch, whiPalatka, to my delight, I found a new steamer called the Everglade, instead of the old General Clinch, which had taken several days to bring me from Savannah to Palatka. The Everglade had modern conveniences, so that the numerous passengers, many of them army officers changing station or going on leave, had a short and delightful passage down the St. JPalatka. The Everglade had modern conveniences, so that the numerous passengers, many of them army officers changing station or going on leave, had a short and delightful passage down the St. John's River and up the coast to Savannah. By Friday, the 28th, I was in Washington and visited the office of our Chief of Ordnance. By September 9th I was speeding away from the capital northward. Some accident to a train ahead of me hindered our
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