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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1. Search the whole document.

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A. H. Burnham (search for this): chapter 1.8
visited our buildings and received military honors extended to him by the corps of cadets on the plain. lie partook of a collation at Colonel Delafield's quarters, in which a few invited guests, ladies and gentlemen, participated. He then went to Fort Putnam on horseback, having a small escort with him, and passed down to Cozzen's Hotel, where he spent the night. The next morning he returned and visited the section-rooms. He stayed in mine long enough to hear one recitation from Cadet A. H. Burnham, of Vermont. He was pleased with this. His suite of gentlemen continued with him as he went from room to room. This was the Prince of Wales as I saw him at West Point, kind, courteous, genial, without any attempt whatever at display, and showing no egotism. I do not wonder that he proves to be a good sovereign. During my fourth year of teaching I had been promoted to assistant professor, which was equivalent to being a captain in the army. Here at our national school there
B. F. Butler (search for this): chapter 1.8
was rehearsed, one after another adding his own paper's version, the exaggerated accounts of the terrible handling that the Sixth Massachusetts Volunteers had had from a Baltimore mob. Much blood shed I Some killed and many wounded, resulting in a complete break — up of the route to Washington and the shutting off of the capital from the North! That was a brief of our gloomy news. Another morning the cloud lifted. There were better tidings. Baltimore recaptured by General B. F. Butler 1 Butler, even without General Scott's sanction, had appeared there in the night with enough men to seize and hold Federal Hill. From that fine position he commanded the city. Another occasion (May 24th) brought us the wildest tales of our troops entering Virginia, and of the resistance at Alexandria. The new President's protegaeacute and friend, young Colonel Ellsworth, had hauled down a hostile flag flying from the belfry of the Marshall House. The proprietor, Jackson, waylaying his descent,
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 1.8
d academy, there was rehearsed, one after another adding his own paper's version, the exaggerated accounts of the terrible handling that the Sixth Massachusetts Volunteers had had from a Baltimore mob. Much blood shed I Some killed and many wounded, resulting in a complete break — up of the route to Washington and the shutting off of the capital from the North! That was a brief of our gloomy news. Another morning the cloud lifted. There were better tidings. Baltimore recaptured by General B. F. Butler 1 Butler, even without General Scott's sanction, had appeared there in the night with enough men to seize and hold Federal Hill. From that fine position he commanded the city. Another occasion (May 24th) brought us the wildest tales of our troops entering Virginia, and of the resistance at Alexandria. The new President's protegaeacute and friend, young Colonel Ellsworth, had hauled down a hostile flag flying from the belfry of the Marshall House. The proprietor, Jackson, waylay
S. S. Carroll (search for this): chapter 1.8
part in coming events. Before his retirement Holabird reached the head of his corps. Lieutenants John Gibbon and S. S. Carroll, both names now high on the roll of fame, filled one after the other the office of quartermaster at West Point. For a time Carroll and I, with our two families, lived under one roof, dividing a pleasant cottage between us. For the last two months, however, of my stay I had, by a small accession of rank, attained a separate domicile. Just before that, Carroll haCarroll had a visit from Lieutenant Fitzhugh Lee, the nephew of Robert E. Lee. How sprightly, energetic, and full of fun he was Secession to him was fun — it would open up glorious possibilitiesl He gave Carroll and myself lively accounts of events in the SoCarroll and myself lively accounts of events in the South. Once, after speaking jocosely, as was his habit, of the perturbed condition of the cotton States, he stopped suddenly for a moment, and then half seriously said: Sprigg, those people of the South are alive and in earnest, and Virginia (his Sta
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 1.8
marked here than elsewhere. Probably no other place existed where men grappled more quickly, more sensitively, and yet more philosophically with the troublesome problems of secession. Prior to any overt act, however, a few members of our community were much disturbed, and by almost morbid anticipations experienced all the fever of the subsequent conflict. All the preceding winter, for example, our worthy professor of ethics, J. W. French, D. D., who had been a lifelong friend of Jefferson Davis, worked day and night in anxious thought and correspondence with him with ever-decreasing hope that he might somehow stay the hands which threatened a fratricidal strife. This excellent professor seemed to be beside himself in his conjectures and in the extreme fears which he manitested. But his soul was truly prophetic and thus early did he feel the blasts of a terrible war which even the radical men of the country as yet deemed improbable. A Southern man, a true patriot, Dr. Fre
Richard Delafield (search for this): chapter 1.8
honors extended to him by the corps of cadets on the plain. lie partook of a collation at Colonel Delafield's quarters, in which a few invited guests, ladies and gentlemen, participated. He then weover with patriotic fervor. Our superintendent, ex-officio commander of the post, was Colonel Richard Delafield. Twice had he served at West Point, twelve years in all, so that more than a thousands felt the direct influence of his inflexible example and the impress of his rugged nature. Delafield was the embodiment of able administration; very exacting in his requirements, and, like the ju after the teachings of experience, we forgive the apparent severities I On March 1, 1861, Colonel Delafield gave place to Colonel A. H. Bowman, who held the superintendency from that time till near 38. With a high character and long, complete record of service, he was a good man to succeed Delafield and to manage the academy during the war period. Colonel Hardee's academy service as comman
evidences of an approaching collision on a large scale were multiplying. The story of Twiggs's surrender of United States troops to Texas, followed by details of imprisonment and paroling, reached us in the latter part of February. Twiggs's promises to allow the troops to go North were mostly broken. Six companies of the United States Infantry, including a few officers and men of other regiments, Lieutenant Colonel Reeve commanding, were obliged to give up to a Confederate commander, Earl Van Dorn, by May 9th. The organizers of the secession movement soon succeeded in firing the Southern heart. As we men from the North and South, at our post on the Hudson, looked anxiously into each other's faces, such indeed was the situation that we knew that civil war with its unknown horrors was at hand. One morning, as officers and professors gathered near the lofty pillars under the stone archway of the old academy, there was rehearsed, one after another adding his own paper's version
of our gloomy news. Another morning the cloud lifted. There were better tidings. Baltimore recaptured by General B. F. Butler 1 Butler, even without General Scott's sanction, had appeared there in the night with enough men to seize and hold Federal Hill. From that fine position he commanded the city. Another occasion (May 24th) brought us the wildest tales of our troops entering Virginia, and of the resistance at Alexandria. The new President's protegaeacute and friend, young Colonel Ellsworth, had hauled down a hostile flag flying from the belfry of the Marshall House. The proprietor, Jackson, waylaying his descent, had shot him to death. I recall, as if it were yesterday, a visit of an officer's wife to our house, about the time General Scott had ordered the first movement from Washington. She was from a cotton State and was outspoken for the Southern cause. She greatly deprecated this forward movement. Just before leaving our house, she said: If it were not for tho
J. W. French (search for this): chapter 1.8
of the hotel. The front hall of this cottage was just one yard square. At the time I came to West Point I was exceedingly desirous to help the chaplain, Professor French, in any way I could, and to open up more general religious privileges to the cadets, to the soldiers, and to the families in the neighborhood. I had it in m almost morbid anticipations experienced all the fever of the subsequent conflict. All the preceding winter, for example, our worthy professor of ethics, J. W. French, D. D., who had been a lifelong friend of Jefferson Davis, worked day and night in anxious thought and correspondence with him with ever-decreasing hope that he mic and thus early did he feel the blasts of a terrible war which even the radical men of the country as yet deemed improbable. A Southern man, a true patriot, Dr. French, when the storm broke, offered all the money he had to strengthen the government exchequer. There were cooler minds who believed that these first symptoms of r
e of rooms and were rather crowded. for about a month. At first, there being no quarters vacant, I could get none assigned to me on account of my low rank. According to the orders from Washington I joined the corps of instructors; and Lieutenant J. B. Fry, of the First Artillery, the adjutant, issued the following necessary orders: First Lieutenant Oliver O. Howard, Ordnance Corps, having reported to the superintendent . . . is assigned to duty in the Department of Mathematics and will repoxpressed by Hardee, and his ardor in hastening forward from the academy the higher classes for junior officers, then in great demand at Washington, were ever remembered in his favor. Lieutenant S. B. Holabird, of the First Infantry, relieved Lieutenant Fry, the adjutant, and remained till May 1, 1861, when on promotion as captain and assistant quartermaster in the staff of the army, he left us to bear his part in coming events. Before his retirement Holabird reached the head of his corps. L
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