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Marietta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
ittle over 60,000. General Elliott then commanded the cavalry-two small divisions under Kilpatrick and Garrard. I have a copy of a letter General Sherman wrote, which I have not seen in print — a sort of offhand communication, such as flew from his pen or pencil in times of emergency: Headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, October 2, 1864. General Davis: Communicate with Howard, and be prepared to send into Atlanta all your traps and to move with ten days rations toward Marietta or to Fairburn, as the case may call for; and if Hood has crossed the Chattahoochee with two corps to take our road, and has left one corps on this side near Campbelton, we should interpose. W. T. Sherman, Major General Commanding. Official: A. C. McClurg, A. A. G. As soon as Sherman found out what Hood was undertaking, he set his whole force in motion northward, except Slocum, with his Twentieth Corps, who was left back to keep Atlanta for our return. Sherman's first surmise of o
Kenesaw Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
rsuit in earnest from Atlanta the morning of October 3d. By the 5th we had reached the vicinity of the battlefield, Kenesaw Mountain. As soon as Sherman heard that a division of the enemy had been seen marching northward not far from the railroadherman says hold fast; we are coming. And Corse's reply: Allatoona, Ga., October 5, 1864. Where is Sherman? Kenesaw Mountain, October 5th. Near you. Tell Allatoona hold on. Sherman says he is working hard for you. Again: Kenesaw MounKenesaw Mountain, October 6th, 2 P. M. How is Corse? What news? Dayton, Aid-de-Camp. Answer: Allatoona, October 6th, 2 P. M. Captain L. M. Dayton, Aid-de-Camp: I am short of a cheekbone and one ear, but am able to whip all hell yet. John M. Corse,I issued the following order: General field orders no. 18.Headquarters Department and Army of the Tennessee, near Kenesaw Mountain, October 9, 1864. While uniting in high commendation awarded by the General in Chief, the Army of the Tennessee
Rome, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
's men, we were obliged to depend upon day and night signaling. Sherman sent one dispatch from Vining's to the top of Kenesaw, which was repeated from Kenesaw to Allatoona Pass. This dispatch was then telegraphed to General J. M. Corse, at Rome, Ga. It was repeated by Vandever, commanding near Kenesaw. But, in fact, there were two dispatches, the first, to wit: Commanding Officers, Allatoona, Kingston, and Rome: The enemy moving on Allatoona, thence to Rome. Sherman. Second disomise. Hie was so desirous to go on this campaign that, though ill, nothing could prevent his undertaking it. At first he rode his horse and did his full duty night and day. When he grew weaker he had himself drawn at the head of his command in an ambulance, and at last he caused his men to carry him along on an army stretcher, resolute to the end. He died, October 29th, in a house near our road, carried thither by his men, while his command was en route between Gaylesville and Rome, Ga.
Mexico, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
osed at the time was a temporary attack. It began about the time we drew out from East Point. After Corse's victory at Allatoona, Ransom had written him as follows: We all feel grateful to God for your brilliant victory, and are proud of our old comrade and his noble division. You have the congratulation and sympathy of the Seventeenth Corps. Ransom was a young officer who had graduated from Norwich University, Vermont, the son of the distinguished Colonel Ransom who lost his life in Mexico. He was a large, strong, finely formed, handsome young man of acknowledged ability, exalted character, and great promise. Hie was so desirous to go on this campaign that, though ill, nothing could prevent his undertaking it. At first he rode his horse and did his full duty night and day. When he grew weaker he had himself drawn at the head of his command in an ambulance, and at last he caused his men to carry him along on an army stretcher, resolute to the end. He died, October 29th,
Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
o depend upon day and night signaling. Sherman sent one dispatch from Vining's to the top of Kenesaw, which was repeated from Kenesaw to Allatoona Pass. This dispatch was then telegraphed to GenKenesaw to Allatoona Pass. This dispatch was then telegraphed to General J. M. Corse, at Rome, Ga. It was repeated by Vandever, commanding near Kenesaw. But, in fact, there were two dispatches, the first, to wit: Commanding Officers, Allatoona, Kingston, and Rome: Kenesaw. But, in fact, there were two dispatches, the first, to wit: Commanding Officers, Allatoona, Kingston, and Rome: The enemy moving on Allatoona, thence to Rome. Sherman. Second dispatch: General Corse, Rome: Sherman directs you to march forward and join Smith's division with your entire command, us engagement, among them the famous signal which came over the Confederate heads from the top of Kenesaw sixteen miles away at 6.30 A. M.: Hold fort; we are coming. Fom this incident the famous hymn o assault the works, and commenced at once the destruction of the railroad. My army was near Kenesaw, pulling on as rapidly as possible northward October 5th. During the night of the 12th we all
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
sed the Coosa River near the hamlet of Coosaville, and then marched up the western bank of the Oostenaula. He went above Resaca, and quite completely destroyed the railroad all the way along above Resaca toward Chattanooga as far as our first battleResaca toward Chattanooga as far as our first battleground, Tunnel Hill. He captured our posts at Dalton and Buzzard Roost, securing at least 1,000 prisoners. By this time the Confederate cavalry under Wheeler had rejoined his army. As a last effort General Stephen D. Lee, with his corps, undertook the capture of the garrison at Resaca. Hood himself made the demand, October 12, 1864, to the commanding officer in these terms: Sir: I demand the immediate and unconditional surrender of the post and garrison under your command, and should w, pulling on as rapidly as possible northward October 5th. During the night of the 12th we all reached the vicinity of Resaca, having, in fact, recovered all of our stations up to that point, and commenced the speedy repair of the culvert and rail
Lost Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
own. There was a trestle bridge farther down the Chattahoochee, at Moore's Ferry, recently constructed. Over it he drew the supplies of his army. He reached Lost Mountain and was established there October 3d. Hood heard that we had an extensive subdepot at Allatoona Pass, so he directed Lieutenant General Stewart to cross a b's, Cheatham's, and Stephen D. Lee's corps were all included in the big northward raid. After Stewart had captured some garrisons he drew back to Hood, near Lost Mountain. Now we commenced the pursuit in earnest from Atlanta the morning of October 3d. By the 5th we had reached the vicinity of the battlefield, Kenesaw Mountain.the Confederates to take Allatoona, and also the prevention of Armstrong's cavalry from destroying the bridge across the Etowah, was brought to Hood, then near Lost Mountain, he continued his march daily northward. He crossed the Coosa River near the hamlet of Coosaville, and then marched up the western bank of the Oostenaula. He
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
ahoochee, are somewhat fragmentary, but they indicate something of the trying situation. General Sherman was constantly meditating something for the future. That something was generally revolving upon a universal pivot, or hinging upon what Hood might do. September 29, 1864, Hood left his position near Palmetto, Ga., putting Brigadier General Iverson with his command to watch and harass whatever Sherman might keep in the neighborhood of Atlanta. Hood crossed the Chattahoochee, with Jackson's cavalry in advance. He had a pontoon bridge at Phillips' Ferry, near that village which bears the name of Pumpkintown. There was a trestle bridge farther down the Chattahoochee, at Moore's Ferry, recently constructed. Over it he drew the supplies of his army. He reached Lost Mountain and was established there October 3d. Hood heard that we had an extensive subdepot at Allatoona Pass, so he directed Lieutenant General Stewart to cross a bridge over the Etowah River not far north of
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
ook strong measures of retaliation to protect such officers from indignities perpetrated upon them by Confederate authorities high in position. It is inconceivable why the exchange of General Milroy's officers was refused by the Confederates, for Milroy was one of the most honorable and law-abiding gentlemen. The attempt to prevent the exchange of the gallant Colonel A. D. Streight and his officers was extraordinary; and more marvelous still, the effort to give them up to the Governor of Alabama for trial on the charge of negro stealing. Another unjustifiable act I have never seen defended was the returning of the Vicksburg prisoners to duty, declaring them exchanged without a proper quid pro quo. All these violations of the cartel on the Confederate side worked badly for our poor Union soldiers, who in large numbers were enduring hardships equal to those inflicted upon many of our prisoners of war in the famous British prison ships during our Revolution. The published acc
Fairburn (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
00. General Elliott then commanded the cavalry-two small divisions under Kilpatrick and Garrard. I have a copy of a letter General Sherman wrote, which I have not seen in print — a sort of offhand communication, such as flew from his pen or pencil in times of emergency: Headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, October 2, 1864. General Davis: Communicate with Howard, and be prepared to send into Atlanta all your traps and to move with ten days rations toward Marietta or to Fairburn, as the case may call for; and if Hood has crossed the Chattahoochee with two corps to take our road, and has left one corps on this side near Campbelton, we should interpose. W. T. Sherman, Major General Commanding. Official: A. C. McClurg, A. A. G. As soon as Sherman found out what Hood was undertaking, he set his whole force in motion northward, except Slocum, with his Twentieth Corps, who was left back to keep Atlanta for our return. Sherman's first surmise of only two Confede
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