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Charles P. Stone (search for this): chapter 11
borne mortally wounded from the field; Lieutenant-Colonel Brown's arm was shattered; Major Cook was wounded, and a prisoner. In the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, Colonel Knipe was twice wounded, and was carried from the field; Lieutenant-Colonel Selfridge's horse was shot under him; Major Mathews fell, dangerously wounded: of its twenty company-officers who went into action, 17 were killed, wounded, or missing, and 226 of its rank and file. In the Fifth Connecticut, Colonel Chapman, Lieutenant-Colonel Stone, and Major Blake were missing, supposed to have been killed. In the Third Wisconsin, Lieutenant-Colonel Crane was killed, pierced with several fatal wounds, and great havoc was wrought among officers and men by a terrific fire of musketry which, falling upon their flank from the underbrush and the woods, swept the companies engaged with great destruction. Official Records, War of the Rebellion, series i. vol XII. part II. Official Reports of Generals Williams, p. 145, and Craw
C. C. Augur (search for this): chapter 11
before him to the crest of a second hill, which was in front of the plateau containing our batteries and the infantry of Augur's division. Although a large number of our cavalry remained in the wheat and corn fields, many retired even to the creecing, now deployed as skirmishers. I have ordered a regiment from the right (Williams's division) and one from the left (Augur's) to advance on the left and in front. 5 P. M. They are now approaching each other. Crawford, peering across the whea to the other side and look again upon our enemy's line of battle. In front of the two brigades of Prince and Geary of Augur's division was Early, reinforced by Thomas's brigade of A. P. Hill's division, with their right resting on a clump of cedgor. Strother, in Harper's Monthly for August, 1871. Official Record, series i vol. XII. part II. p. 157; report of General Augur. Prince moved his infantry against the right and front of Early's line, but without effect. Early stood like a rampa
Ewell, our old antagonist at Winchester. General Early commanded the foremost brigade of this divfew minutes advanced again to the ridge. As Early came up with his skirmishers he scoured the woantry were visible in his front. Hardly had Early taken up his position, when suddenly the two rhis division along the Culpeper road as far as Early's left. His batteries were placed in echelon es of Prince and Geary of Augur's division was Early, reinforced by Thomas's brigade of A. P. Hill'aferro's brigade, which closed the gap between Early's left and Garnett's right. The remaining brin their front, while two brigades Thomas's, Early's, and Taliaferro's. and more batteries of theed his infantry against the right and front of Early's line, but without effect. Early stood like ry's blows upon its right and upon the left of Early began to tell. Almost the language used by from Ewell's batteries on Cedar Mountain; from Early's right, near the clump of cedars; from Winder[6 more...]
advanced the more withering the fire became. At last, with a loss of eighty killed and wounded out of the two hundred and sixty-seven that charged across the field, they fell back into the woods, to be re-formed and again to advance, as will hereafter appear. While this attack was in progress, Banks threw forward his two brigades on the left of the Culpeper road. Simultaneously with Crawford's advance, Geary in centre and Prince on left moved against the enemy with vigor. Strother, in Harper's Monthly for August, 1871. Official Record, series i vol. XII. part II. p. 157; report of General Augur. Prince moved his infantry against the right and front of Early's line, but without effect. Early stood like a rampart, says the Southern historian, and hurled back all efforts made against him. Geary's advance through the cornfield, with his right along the Culpeper road, uniting with the regiments assaulting across the wheat-field, forced back the enemy's line in their front, and thr
t I could find, of all, only what remained of the six Wisconsin companies. Of the Twenty-eighth New York, the Fifth Connecticut, or the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, not a vestige met my eyes. The slaughter had indeed been fearful. Though the Forty-sixth New York, the Fifth Connecticut, and part of the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania had reached a battery upon which they had charged, they had been compelled to fall back, leaving many of their number on the field. In the Twenty-eighth New York, Colonel Donelly was borne mortally wounded from the field; Lieutenant-Colonel Brown's arm was shattered; Major Cook was wounded, and a prisoner. In the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, Colonel Knipe was twice wounded, and was carried from the field; Lieutenant-Colonel Selfridge's horse was shot under him; Major Mathews fell, dangerously wounded: of its twenty company-officers who went into action, 17 were killed, wounded, or missing, and 226 of its rank and file. In the Fifth Connecticut, Colonel Chapman,
C. S. Winder (search for this): chapter 11
s without molestation, as the enemy claims. Winder now advanced his division along the Culpeper rcing the road, in rear of the batteries; while Winder's (or the Stonewall) brigade was in reserve. n Cedar Mountain, from Early's right, and from Winder's brigade in the Culpeper road, just beyond thhe dark forest beyond, over which the smoke of Winder's batteries hung in thick clouds, aided Banks the road and opposite our right was stationed Winder's division of three brigades, one of which, thand Garnett's right. The remaining brigade of Winder's division (the Stonewall) was in reserve, as ively formed on the enemy's left of the road. Winder's reserve brigade was formed a little to the lring before them the enemy's second brigade of Winder's division,--broken, thrown back in masses fro He threw forward the old Stonewall brigade of Winder's division, with Branch's of Hill's division; Early's right, near the clump of cedars; from Winder in the road, and from every point in the more [1 more...]
Taliaferro (search for this): chapter 11
, which was concealed by the woods on our side of the same field; Taliaferro's brigade was drawn up parallel to and facing the road, in rear o of the wheat-field and immediately opposite Crawford. Then came Taliaferro's brigade, which closed the gap between Early's left and Garnett'ries in their front, while two brigades Thomas's, Early's, and Taliaferro's. and more batteries of the enemy were ready to spring from the n's line was turned and its rear gained. Then, while the left of Taliaferro's brigade gave way, Geary's blows upon its right and upon the lef in their histories. As Campbell had been overthrown, so next was Taliaferro; and then came the left of Early's brigade, which, first wavering in a moment restored the failing battle. Fragments of Early and Taliaferro returned to their places, forming around that heroic nucleus, the little space, the infantry of Branch closed in upon their right, Taliaferro and Early upon their left, and opened fire, when it fled to the r
, Colonel Donelly was borne mortally wounded from the field; Lieutenant-Colonel Brown's arm was shattered; Major Cook was wounded, and a prisoner. In the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, Colonel Knipe was twice wounded, and was carried from the field; Lieutenant-Colonel Selfridge's horse was shot under him; Major Mathews fell, dangerously wounded: of its twenty company-officers who went into action, 17 were killed, wounded, or missing, and 226 of its rank and file. In the Fifth Connecticut, Colonel Chapman, Lieutenant-Colonel Stone, and Major Blake were missing, supposed to have been killed. In the Third Wisconsin, Lieutenant-Colonel Crane was killed, pierced with several fatal wounds, and great havoc was wrought among officers and men by a terrific fire of musketry which, falling upon their flank from the underbrush and the woods, swept the companies engaged with great destruction. Official Records, War of the Rebellion, series i. vol XII. part II. Official Reports of Generals Will
ork, the Fifth Connecticut, or the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, not a vestige met my eyes. The slaughter had indeed been fearful. Though the Forty-sixth New York, the Fifth Connecticut, and part of the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania had reached a battery upon which they had charged, they had been compelled to fall back, leaving many of their number on the field. In the Twenty-eighth New York, Colonel Donelly was borne mortally wounded from the field; Lieutenant-Colonel Brown's arm was shattered; Major Cook was wounded, and a prisoner. In the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, Colonel Knipe was twice wounded, and was carried from the field; Lieutenant-Colonel Selfridge's horse was shot under him; Major Mathews fell, dangerously wounded: of its twenty company-officers who went into action, 17 were killed, wounded, or missing, and 226 of its rank and file. In the Fifth Connecticut, Colonel Chapman, Lieutenant-Colonel Stone, and Major Blake were missing, supposed to have been killed. In the Third Wis
A. S. Williams (search for this): chapter 11
s. I have ordered a regiment from the right (Williams's division) and one from the left (Augur's) tat-field, without finding the enemy, when General Williams received orders from Banks to send these companies to report to Crawford. Before Williams received this order, Crawford himself, in violatioeal to Banks was answered through an order to Williams, communicated to me; and thus these companiesrested on the right, awaiting orders from General Williams,--began in volleys so terrible that the salf-past 5 o'clock in the afternoon, when General Williams, my division commander, sent me an order gade line, then fixed my field-glass upon General Williams, and awaited his summons. Moments passedCaptain Pittman, aid to General Williams: General Williams directs you to move your whole command to the support of General Crawford. General Williams may have waved his handkerchief while I was en vol XII. part II. Official Reports of Generals Williams, p. 145, and Crawford, p. 149. But t[2 more...]
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