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nett, was in line in the woods on the edge of the wheat-field and immediately opposite Crawford. Then came Taliaferro's brigade, which closed the gap between Early's left and Garnett's right. The remaining brigade of Winder's division (the Stonewall) was in reserve, as also were five of the six brigades of Hill's division, which were successively formed on the enemy's left of the road. Winder's reserve brigade was formed a little to the left of Branch, who was followed by Archer, Pender, Stafford, and Field. The Second Massachusetts, Twenty-seventh Indiana, and four companies Third Wisconsin (of my brigade), and the Tenth Maine. On our left we had two brigades preparing to charge through the cornfield upon three brigades and four batteries in their front, while two brigades Thomas's, Early's, and Taliaferro's. and more batteries of the enemy were ready to spring from the mountain-side upon their flank. On our right a single brigade (Crawford's) confronted the enemy's left
Henry Prince (search for this): chapter 11
ghtening Jackson. A battalion from the Eighth and Twelfth Regulars, under Captain Pitcher, from Prince's brigade, had advanced through the corn to within thirty yards of the enemy's line, where, desphe other side and look again upon our enemy's line of battle. In front of the two brigades of Prince and Geary of Augur's division was Early, reinforced by Thomas's brigade of A. P. Hill's divisions on the left of the Culpeper road. Simultaneously with Crawford's advance, Geary in centre and Prince on left moved against the enemy with vigor. Strother, in Harper's Monthly for August, 1871. Official Record, series i vol. XII. part II. p. 157; report of General Augur. Prince moved his infantry against the right and front of Early's line, but without effect. Early stood like a rampart, saysf there had been no reserve to the enemy, and no brigades on Cedar Mountain to rush in and take Prince in flank and rear, and if I had been ordered to move forward simultaneously with my brigade as a
John A. Campbell (search for this): chapter 11
t. His batteries were placed in echelon along the road, and his infantry stationed as follows: Campbell's Commanded by Garnett. brigade was in the woods fronting the wheat-field and opposite Crawopposite our right was stationed Winder's division of three brigades, one of which, the second (Campbell's), commanded by General Garnett, was in line in the woods on the edge of the wheat-field and ifellows braved death in that heroic charge, the destiny of overpowering numbers was against us. Campbell's Commanded by Garnett. brigade had been thrown, helpless and confused, into a disordered m of Early began to tell. Almost the language used by Dabney and Cooke in their histories. As Campbell had been overthrown, so next was Taliaferro; and then came the left of Early's brigade, which, e orders of the officers were unheeded amid the vast uproar and shouts of the assailants. Colonel Campbell was slain, but the survivors of the second brigade fought on without rank or method, with b
line in the woods on the edge of the wheat-field and immediately opposite Crawford. Then came Taliaferro's brigade, which closed the gap between Early's left and Garnett's right. The remaining brigade of Winder's division (the Stonewall) was in reserve, as also were five of the six brigades of Hill's division, which were successively formed on the enemy's left of the road. Winder's reserve brigade was formed a little to the left of Branch, who was followed by Archer, Pender, Stafford, and Field. The Second Massachusetts, Twenty-seventh Indiana, and four companies Third Wisconsin (of my brigade), and the Tenth Maine. On our left we had two brigades preparing to charge through the cornfield upon three brigades and four batteries in their front, while two brigades Thomas's, Early's, and Taliaferro's. and more batteries of the enemy were ready to spring from the mountain-side upon their flank. On our right a single brigade (Crawford's) confronted the enemy's left; but here t
S. E. Pittman (search for this): chapter 11
oment and again resumed, mingled with the pitiless crash of musketry that rose from the assaulting column I was to support,--and yet no signal, but instead thereof a messenger dashing up from General Banks, the first from him that day: General Banks directs that you send the Second Massachusetts Regiment down the pike to him. Before I could do more than give the order, before the regiment could take a step on its course, a horseman, spurring in furious haste, dashed to my side. It was Captain Pittman, aid to General Williams: General Williams directs you to move your whole command to the support of General Crawford. General Williams may have waved his handkerchief while I was engaged in moving the Second Regiment in compliance with Banks's order: I did not perceive it. But the delay was only momentary. The Second sprang forward; so did the remaining companies of the Third Wisconsin; so did the Twenty-seventh Indiana. It was now a little before six o'clock. The rattle and roar o
giment did not advance, and ordered him to direct it to do so. Major Pelouze to Major Gould (letter), in the History of the Tenth Maine. Major Pelouze galloped forward and delivered the order, saying that Banks forbade this backward movement. Colonel Beal persisted, and the regiment kept on. A furious altercation, with angry gesticulations, arose, during which Major Pelouze proceeded to the rear of the regimental colors and ordered the regiment to advance, crying out in loud tones that Siegel was in the rear, or was coming, and also informing Colonel Beal that Banks wished him to know that there was only a small force of the enemy in front of him. Major Pelouze was with the regiment but five minutes, when he was disabled, and then Colonel Beal placed his command behind the ridge to secure so much of protection. It was while fighting behind this ridge, and when they had not been firing long, that skirmishers from the Second Massachusetts Regiment were seen to the right, on a
nd a prisoner. In the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, Colonel Knipe was twice wounded, and was carried from the field; Lieutenant-Colonel Selfridge's horse was shot under him; Major Mathews fell, dangerously wounded: of its twenty company-officers who went into action, 17 were killed, wounded, or missing, and 226 of its rank and file. In the Fifth Connecticut, Colonel Chapman, Lieutenant-Colonel Stone, and Major Blake were missing, supposed to have been killed. In the Third Wisconsin, Lieutenant-Colonel Crane was killed, pierced with several fatal wounds, and great havoc was wrought among officers and men by a terrific fire of musketry which, falling upon their flank from the underbrush and the woods, swept the companies engaged with great destruction. Official Records, War of the Rebellion, series i. vol XII. part II. Official Reports of Generals Williams, p. 145, and Crawford, p. 149. But there was, however, one relic of Crawford's brigade, and that was Crawford himself. I sa
from the field; Lieutenant-Colonel Brown's arm was shattered; Major Cook was wounded, and a prisoner. In the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, Colonel Knipe was twice wounded, and was carried from the field; Lieutenant-Colonel Selfridge's horse was shot under him; Major Mathews fell, dangerously wounded: of its twenty company-officers who went into action, 17 were killed, wounded, or missing, and 226 of its rank and file. In the Fifth Connecticut, Colonel Chapman, Lieutenant-Colonel Stone, and Major Blake were missing, supposed to have been killed. In the Third Wisconsin, Lieutenant-Colonel Crane was killed, pierced with several fatal wounds, and great havoc was wrought among officers and men by a terrific fire of musketry which, falling upon their flank from the underbrush and the woods, swept the companies engaged with great destruction. Official Records, War of the Rebellion, series i. vol XII. part II. Official Reports of Generals Williams, p. 145, and Crawford, p. 149. But t
A. P. Hill (search for this): chapter 11
atteries; while Winder's (or the Stonewall) brigade was in reserve. Hill's division of six brigades was still farther to the rear, but within of Augur's division was Early, reinforced by Thomas's brigade of A. P. Hill's division, with their right resting on a clump of cedars and sup Stonewall) was in reserve, as also were five of the six brigades of Hill's division, which were successively formed on the enemy's left of thard the old Stonewall brigade of Winder's division, with Branch's of Hill's division; and these, with the newly formed lines of those that hadof his reserves drove our troops back with terrible slaughter; while Hill Official Reports of Generals Jackson and Hill. Moore's Rebellion Hill. Moore's Rebellion Record. says, The pursuit was checked, and the enemy driven back. But to Dabney must we turn for Jackson's achievements in heroic measure.w delivered when the fine brigade of Branch, from the division of A. P. Hill, hardly allowing itself time to form, rushed forward to second th
ived the praise of checking our pursuit) the loss was light, being only ten killed and fifteen wounded. It now becomes necessary to take up the history of the Tenth Maine, which for some unaccountable reason, as I have said, was dropped out of Crawford's brigade when the charge was made. After a little delay it was moved into the woods in its front by one of Banks's staff-officers; ordered to halt and lie down, with its left resting near the road, where a United States battery, under Captain Best, was receiving two for every one of its solid compliments sent the enemy. In the road and near the regiment were Banks and staff. From where the Tenth Maine was stationed, a movement of troops on the enemy's side was perceived; and Banks's reply, when this was pointed out to him,--Thank you, sir; this is provided for, --was heard, although it was soon found that Banks was simply indulging in tragic metaphor, and had not provided for that or anything else. And from this point shells a
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