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Edward A. Silsbee (search for this): chapter 3
Chapter 3: a Shelley manuscript Were I to hear to-morrow that the main library of Harvard University, with every one of its 334,000 volumes, had been reduced to ashes, there is in my mind no question what book I should most regret. It is that unique, battered, dingy little quarto volume of Shelley's manuscript poems in his own handwriting and that of his wife first given by Miss Jane Clairmont (Shelley's Constantia ) to Mr. Edward A. Silsbee, and then presented by him to the library. Not only is it full of that aroma of fascination which belongs to the actual handiwork of a master, but its numerous corrections and interlineations make the reader feel that he is actually travelling in the pathway of that delicate mind. Mr. George E. Woodberry had the use of it; he printed in the Harvard University Calendar a facsimile of the Ode to a Skylark as given in the manuscript, and has cited many of its various readings in his edition of Shelley's poems. But he has passed by a good m
George E. Woodberry (search for this): chapter 3
that he is actually travelling in the pathway of that delicate mind. Mr. George E. Woodberry had the use of it; he printed in the Harvard University Calendar a facpreserved. There occur in this manuscript the following variations from Prof. Woodberry's text of The Sensitive Plant --variations not mentioned by him, for some ave noted as uncancelled in this particular poem, beyond those recorded by Prof. Woodberry. But there are many cases where the manuscript shows, in Shelley's own haas. I have therefore copied a number of these modified lines, giving first Prof. Woodberry's text and then the original form of language, as it appears in Shelley's handwriting, italicizing the words which vary, and giving the pages of Prof. Woodberry's edition. The cancellation or change is sometimes made in pen, sometimes in ed, although I confess it seems to me both less vigorous and less tender. Prof. Woodberry mentions the change, but does not give the cancelled verse. In this and o
Jane Clairmont (search for this): chapter 3
Chapter 3: a Shelley manuscript Were I to hear to-morrow that the main library of Harvard University, with every one of its 334,000 volumes, had been reduced to ashes, there is in my mind no question what book I should most regret. It is that unique, battered, dingy little quarto volume of Shelley's manuscript poems in his own handwriting and that of his wife first given by Miss Jane Clairmont (Shelley's Constantia ) to Mr. Edward A. Silsbee, and then presented by him to the library. Not only is it full of that aroma of fascination which belongs to the actual handiwork of a master, but its numerous corrections and interlineations make the reader feel that he is actually travelling in the pathway of that delicate mind. Mr. George E. Woodberry had the use of it; he printed in the Harvard University Calendar a facsimile of the Ode to a Skylark as given in the manuscript, and has cited many of its various readings in his edition of Shelley's poems. But he has passed by a good m
Constantia (search for this): chapter 3
Chapter 3: a Shelley manuscript Were I to hear to-morrow that the main library of Harvard University, with every one of its 334,000 volumes, had been reduced to ashes, there is in my mind no question what book I should most regret. It is that unique, battered, dingy little quarto volume of Shelley's manuscript poems in his own handwriting and that of his wife first given by Miss Jane Clairmont (Shelley's Constantia ) to Mr. Edward A. Silsbee, and then presented by him to the library. Not only is it full of that aroma of fascination which belongs to the actual handiwork of a master, but its numerous corrections and interlineations make the reader feel that he is actually travelling in the pathway of that delicate mind. Mr. George E. Woodberry had the use of it; he printed in the Harvard University Calendar a facsimile of the Ode to a Skylark as given in the manuscript, and has cited many of its various readings in his edition of Shelley's poems. But he has passed by a good ma
hat unique, battered, dingy little quarto volume of Shelley's manuscript poems in his own handwriting and that of his wife first given by Miss Jane Clairmont (Shelley's Constantia ) to Mr. Edward A. Silsbee, and then preseited many of its various readings in his edition of Shelley's poems. But he has passed by a good many others; hese need, I think, for the sake of all students of Shelley, to be put in print, so that in case of the loss ortes or supplemental notes, and yet not cancelled by Shelley: Three days the flowers of the garden fair Likethere are many cases where the manuscript shows, in Shelley's own handwriting, variations subsequently cancellehen the original form of language, as it appears in Shelley's handwriting, italicizing the words which vary, ane that, in a few cases, it may have been made by Mrs. Shelley. Gazed through clear dew on the tender sky. ve Plant, except that there is a cancelled verse of Shelley's Curse against Lord Eldon for depriving him of his
verse beginning By those unpractised accents of young speech began originally as follows: By that sweet voice which who could understand To frame to sounds of love and love divine, Not thou. This was abandoned and the following substituted: By those pure accents which at my command Should have been framed to love and lore divine, Now like a lute, fretted by some rude hand, Uttering harsh discords, they must echo thine. This also was erased, and the present form substituted, although I confess it seems to me both less vigorous and less tender. Prof. Woodberry mentions the change, but does not give the cancelled verse. In this and other cases I do not venture to blame him for the omission; since an editor must, after all, exercise his own judgment. Yet I cannot but wish that he had carried his citation, even of cancelled variations, a little further; and it is evident that some future student of poetic art will yet find rich gleanings in the Harvard Shelley manuscript. 1893