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Cleveland (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
give up its heresies Supports McKinley Dana's substantial victory over public corruption loss of friends Dana's ample fortune travels beyond sea visits Mexico and Cuba Supports Cuban rebellion tribute to Jose Marti Dana's scholarship class in literature his inner life skill as horseman appreciation of art home at Sixtieth Street and Madison Avenue paintings, tapestry, and ceramics Dana's personality and home life love of children the art of newspaper making The end of Cleveland's second administration marked the close of the Sun's co-operation with the Democratic party. It had pointed out with persistency the failure of that party in Congress to live up to the pledges contained in its platform, especially in reference to the tariff; and when it cast aside at Chicago its essential ideas and best traditions, and converted itself into a Socialistic-Populist party, with William J. Bryan as its candidate for president, on a platform containing doctrines which were fo
Saint Petersburg (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
, and Italy. While he manifested but little curiosity to see the rulers or the courts, or to mingle with the official classes, he studied the people closely and gave much time to art of every kind. On one of his visits to Rome he had a private audience of the pope, during which they discussed Dante and quoted from the Divine Comedy, to their mutual gratification. On another he crossed the Black Sea, and, after visiting Tiflis, went north through the Caucasus to Nijni-Novgorod, Moscow, St. Petersburg, and Warsaw. On still another he took in Constantinople, Brusa, the Levant, and Jerusalem. After his return from these Eastern journeys, he wrote several letters for the Sun, in which he gave an account of his travels and observations. These having been somewhat out of the usual, were subsequently collected and published in a small but interesting volume which is still on sale. Eastern Journeys-Notes of Travel, etc. pp. 114. By Charles A. Dana. D. Appleton & Co., New York, 1898.
serve and report upon the revolutionary movements of 1848 and 1849. He made his second visit in 1879, and his third in 1882. During the next decade he went many times, his travels lasting three or four months and taking him in turn to England, Ireland, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy. While he manifested but little curiosity to see the rulers or the courts, or to mingle with the official classes, he studied the people closely and gave much time to art of every kind. On one of his visits tty upon Dana's sympathy and support. He had been the friend of Kossuth, of Mazzini, and of Garibaldi. He had pleaded in turn for a Democratic republic in France, for a free and united Germany, for the independence of Hungary, for home rule in Ireland, and for the consolidation and enfranchisement of Italy, and naturally, when he sent greetings to the Cubans, they hailed him as a friend who would stand with them to the last. They looked confidently to him for guidance and assistance, as well
Leipzig (Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 29
d away down in the Malay Archipelago. That is precisely what I can do in the Dana Collection. There are specimens there of porcelain from all the places I have mentioned. Most of them were found by excavating graves and sites of former dwellings; and perhaps the most interesting thing in the study of porcelain is the identification of these pieces with those described in the various literature of China which deals with the remote history and manufacture of porcelain. Since Dr. Hirth, of Leipsic, and Dr. Bushell, of Peking, have taught us to translate Chinese better than the older scholars did, a new field of surer progress to knowledge has been opened before us, and the ancient porcelains of assured provenance have now an importance they did not possess before. For this reason I was, in my narrow way, quite carried away by my researches in New York; and I am persuaded that Mr. Dana must have had a most profound instinct in relation to the whole subject. Otherwise, how could he
st developments of trade and make old documents disclose that the Arabs many centuries ago invaded the remoter Eastern seas and carried back to the shores of India, to the Red Sea, and to the African coast, and to all the islands and continents that lie between, the products of China, it is mighty interesting to be able to put your hand on a piece of Chinese porcelain that somebody has dug up in Madagascar, or in Ceylon, or on the coast of Malabar, or on a Spice Island away down in the Malay Archipelago. That is precisely what I can do in the Dana Collection. There are specimens there of porcelain from all the places I have mentioned. Most of them were found by excavating graves and sites of former dwellings; and perhaps the most interesting thing in the study of porcelain is the identification of these pieces with those described in the various literature of China which deals with the remote history and manufacture of porcelain. Since Dr. Hirth, of Leipsic, and Dr. Bushell, of Pe
China (China) (search for this): chapter 29
s time as he could spare from actual work. And in this no Chinese scholar who works throughout life and never finishes his e form of art to which Dana gave the greatest attention was Chinese porcelain. To this, from the day it first attracted his nombinations to the end of his life. In addition to many Chinese pieces, it contained a .smaller number of early Korean, Jay hearers about the earliest dispersion of the porcelain of China to other countries, I should be able to show them some of ihe islands and continents that lie between, the products of China, it is mighty interesting to be able to put your hand on a piece of Chinese porcelain that somebody has dug up in Madagascar, or in Ceylon, or on the coast of Malabar, or on a Spice Isse pieces with those described in the various literature of China which deals with the remote history and manufacture of porcc, and Dr. Bushell, of Peking, have taught us to translate Chinese better than the older scholars did, a new field of surer
America (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
and frequently in the winter, he directed his men in laying out the grounds, constructing paths, roads, and flower-beds, and in transplanting trees and arranging new combinations and effects. To this end he brought rare trees from all parts of America and Europe. Through the thoughtfulness of a friend, who fetched him acorns from the tomb of Confucius, he soon had flourishing Chinese oaks to add to the native trees which made his grounds so attractive. Many of his trees were noted for their perfection of form and foliage, which, added to the variety of the species found there, made Dosoris a place at which arboriculturists from all parts of America were welcome, and to which many came to study as well as to admire. For many years it is believed that no private place in the country afforded the journals devoted to such matters so many interesting subjects for illustration and discussion. As there was nothing churlish or exclusive in Dana's nature, he took as much pleasure in sh
Moscow, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
rmany, Spain, and Italy. While he manifested but little curiosity to see the rulers or the courts, or to mingle with the official classes, he studied the people closely and gave much time to art of every kind. On one of his visits to Rome he had a private audience of the pope, during which they discussed Dante and quoted from the Divine Comedy, to their mutual gratification. On another he crossed the Black Sea, and, after visiting Tiflis, went north through the Caucasus to Nijni-Novgorod, Moscow, St. Petersburg, and Warsaw. On still another he took in Constantinople, Brusa, the Levant, and Jerusalem. After his return from these Eastern journeys, he wrote several letters for the Sun, in which he gave an account of his travels and observations. These having been somewhat out of the usual, were subsequently collected and published in a small but interesting volume which is still on sale. Eastern Journeys-Notes of Travel, etc. pp. 114. By Charles A. Dana. D. Appleton & Co., New Yor
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ss to live up to the pledges contained in its platform, especially in reference to the tariff; and when it cast aside at Chicago its essential ideas and best traditions, and converted itself into a Socialistic-Populist party, with William J. Bryan and, although the crisis which called them forth is happily long since past, they are given in part as follows: The Chicago platform invites us to establish a currency which will enable a man to pay his debts with half as much property as he wt with a hundred dollars each one of which is worth only half as much as each dollar he received from the lender. The Chicago platform sanctions the use of the appointing power of the President in such a way as to control the federal judiciary in— about him once or twice a week, and read with them some important book in a foreign tongue. He began this practice in Chicago with Dante, and continued it with other classics almost without intermission to the end of his life. As his eyes never
Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 29
s substantial victory over public corruption loss of friends Dana's ample fortune travels beyond sea visits Mexico and Cuba Supports Cuban rebellion tribute to Jose Marti Dana's scholarship class in literature his inner life skill as horsemthe country, but made the acquaintance of the president, Gonzales, and many leading men. Later he travelled extensively in Cuba, and, having become proficient in the Spanish language in early life, it was easy for him to acquire an exact and extensivrty encouragement through the columns of the Sun: To the brave men in arms for the independence and the liberties of Cuba, to the patriots who would give their country a Democratic-Republican government in the place of royalty, to the liberatorwhich never failed them. One of the first and most admirable of their number to lay down his life for the independence of Cuba was Jose Marti, and the news of his death aroused in no one greater regret than it did in Dana. It called from his pen a
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