hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
H. B. Stowe 492 0 Browse Search
Harriet Beecher Stowe 274 2 Browse Search
America (Netherlands) 128 0 Browse Search
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) 128 4 Browse Search
A. T. Noel Byron 126 0 Browse Search
Jesus Christ 122 0 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 100 0 Browse Search
Europe 94 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 82 0 Browse Search
George Eliot 76 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe. Search the whole document.

Found 165 total hits in 61 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
tations in the papers, with garbled extracts from the book. A cousin residing in Georgia this winter says that the prejudice against my name is so strong that she dares not have it appear on the outside of her letters, and that very amiable and excellent people have asked her if such as I could be received into reputable society at the North. Under these circumstances, it is a matter of particular regret that the New York Observer, an old and long-established religious paper in the United States, extensively read at the South, should have come out in such a bitter and unscrupulous style of attack as even to induce some Southern papers, with a generosity one often finds at the South, to protest against it. That they should use their Christian character and the sacred name of Christ still further to blind the minds and strengthen the prejudices of their Southern brethren is to me a matter of deepest sorrow. All those things, of course, cannot touch me in my private capacity,
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s day after day that one would think the sun should hide his face from, and yet, to get used to them, to discusss them coolly, to dismiss them coolly. For example, the sale of intelligent, handsome colored females for vile purposes, facts of the most public nature, have made this a perfectly understood matter in our Northern States. I have now, myself, under charge and educating, two girls of whose character any mother might be proud, who have actually been rescued from this sale in the New Orleans market. I desire to inclose a tract Afterwards embodied in the Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin. in which I sketched down a few incidents in the history of the family to which these girls belong; it will show more than words can the kind of incident to which I allude. The tract is not a published document, only printed to assist me in raising money, and it would not, at present, be for the good of the parties to have it published even in England. But though these things are known in th
Liberia (Liberia) (search for this): chapter 10
s. But oppression maketh a wise man mad, and they spoke and did many things in the frenzy of outraged humanity that repelled sympathy and threw multitudes off to a hopeless distance. It is mournful to think of all the absurdities that have been said and done in the name and for the sake of this holy cause, that have so long and so fatally retarded it. I confess that I expected for myself nothing but abuse from extreme abolitionists, especially as I dared to name a forbidden shibboleth, Liberia, and the fact that the wildest and extremest abolitionists united with the coldest conservatives, at first, to welcome and advance the book is a thing that I have never ceased to wonder at. I have written this long letter because I am extremely desirous that some leading minds in England should know how we stand. The subject is now on trial at the bar of a civilized world — a Christian world! and I feel sure that God has not ordered this without a design. Yours for the cause, Harri
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Uncle Tom's Cabin is denounced by time-serving preachers as a meretricious work. Will you not come out in defense of it and roll back the tide of vituperation? To this the editor answered: We should as soon think of coming out in defense of Shakespeare. Several attempts were made in the South to write books controverting Uncle Tom's Cabin, and showing a much brighter side of the slavery question, but they all fell flat and were left unread. Of one of them, a clergyman of Charleston, S. C., wrote in a private letter:-- I have read two columns in the Southern press of Mrs. Eastman's Aunt Phillis' Cabin, or Southern Life as it is, with the remarks of the editor. I have no comment to make on it, as that is done by itself. The editor might have saved himself being writ down an ass by the public if he had withheld his nonsense. If the two columns are a fair specimen of Mrs. Eastman's book, I pity her attempt and her name as an author. In due time Mrs. Stowe began
Glasgow (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 10
e world on the facts of which I am the unwilling publisher, that the Southern States may be compelled to notice what hitherto they have denied and ignored. If they call the fiction dreadful, what will they say of the fact, where I cannot deny, suppress, or color? But it is God's will that it must be told, and I am the unwilling agent. This coming month of April, my husband and myself expect to sail for England on the invitation of the Anti-Slavery Society of the Ladies and Gentlemen of Glasgow, to confer with friends there. There are points where English people can do much good; there are also points where what they seek to do may be made more efficient by a little communion with those who know the feelings and habits of our countrymen: but I am persuaded that England can do much for us. My lord, they greatly mistake who see, in this movement of English Christians for the abolition of slavery, signs of disunion between the nations. It is the purest and best proof of friendsh
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
blind conscience on this question. The question is not allowed to be discussed, and he who sells a book or publishes a tract makes himself liable to fine and imprisonment. My book is, therefore, as much under an interdict in some parts of the South as the Bible is in Italy. It is not allowed in the bookstores, and the greater part of the people hear of it and me only through grossly caricatured representations in the papers, with garbled extracts from the book. A cousin residing in Georgia this winter says that the prejudice against my name is so strong that she dares not have it appear on the outside of her letters, and that very amiable and excellent people have asked her if such as I could be received into reputable society at the North. Under these circumstances, it is a matter of particular regret that the New York Observer, an old and long-established religious paper in the United States, extensively read at the South, should have come out in such a bitter and unscru
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
would it be for slavery if that law had never been enacted; for it gave occasion for Uncle Tom's Cabin. Garrison wrote to Mrs. Stowe:-- I estimate the value of anti-slavery writing by the abuse it brings. Now all the defenders of slavery have let me alone and are abusing you. To Mrs. Stowe, Whittier wrote:-- Ten thousand thanks for thy immortal book. My young friend Mary Irving (of the Era ) writes me that she has been reading it to some twenty young ladies, daughters of Louisiana slaveholders, near New Orleans, and amid the scenes described in it, and that they, with one accord, pronounce it true. Truly thy friend, John G. Whittier. From Thomas Wentworth Higginson came the following:-- To have written at once the most powerful of contemporary fiction and the most efficient of anti-slavery tracts is a double triumph in literature and philanthropy, to which this country has heretofore seen no parallel. Yours respectfully and gratefully, T. W. Higgins
America (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 10
is the interest we touch. All the wealth of America may be said to be interested in it. And, if I working-classes of England and the slaves of America. In her answer to this criticism and complai because of this striking difference; that in America the slave has not a recognized human characten theory at least, and that is something. In America any man may strike any slave he meets, and if nature to be widely different in England and America. In both countries, when any class holds powes in possession as the slaveholder offers in America. There was the same kind of resistance in ti-slavery effort. Again, in England as in America, there are, in those very classes whose inter greatly to my regret, I observe sometimes in America. It is a relic of barbarism for two such nations as England and America to cherish any such unworthy prejudice. For my own part, I am proud d best nation on earth. Have not England and America one blood, one language, one literature, and [1 more...]
Brunswick, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
onounce it true. Truly thy friend, John G. Whittier. From Thomas Wentworth Higginson came the following:-- To have written at once the most powerful of contemporary fiction and the most efficient of anti-slavery tracts is a double triumph in literature and philanthropy, to which this country has heretofore seen no parallel. Yours respectfully and gratefully, T. W. Higginson. A few days after the publication of the book, Mrs. Stowe, writing from Boston to her husband in Brunswick, says: I have been in such a whirl ever since I have been here. I found business prosperous. Jewett animated. He has been to Washington and conversed with all the leading senators, Northern and Southern. Seward told him it was the greatest book of the times, or something of that sort, and he and Sumner went around with him to recommend it to Southern men and get them to read it. It is true that with these congratulatory and commendatory letters came hosts of others, threateni
France (France) (search for this): chapter 10
om the furious and bitter tone of some English papers, they also have some sensitive connection with the evil. I trust that those noble and gentle ladies of England who have in so good a spirit expressed their views of the question will not be discouraged by the strong abuse that will follow. England is doing us good. We need the vitality of a disinterested country to warm our torpid and benumbed public sentiment. Nay, the storm of feeling which the book raises in Italy, Germany, and France is all good, though truly 't is painful for us Americans to bear. The fact is, we have become used to this frightful evil, and we need the public sentiment of the world to help us. I am now writing a work to be called Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin. It contains, in an undeniable form, the facts which corroborate all that I have said. One third of it is taken up with judicial records of trials and decisions, and with statute law. It is a most fearful story, my lord,--I can truly say that I w
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...