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Rydal Mount (search for this): chapter 14
xcept from his pen, sustained the four persons thus added to his family. Just as I might do for — if I would. Hartley Coleridge's bad habits naturally inherited from his father. Waiter offers to keep the talking gentleman to board him, to clothe him. Oh don't, don't take away the talking gentleman! How wicked to transmit these morbid states to children! Mr. Mailman's hard and worldly estimate. Introduced to Dr. Gregory. A man of truly large, benevolent mind. Next day Grasmere, Rydal Mount. I was disappointed in the habitation of Wordsworth. It is almost the least beautiful spot hereabout. Remarks of our landlady about W. how pleasing, constantly ending with And Mrs. Wordsworth, too. And really, ma'am, I think it is because he is so kind a neighbor. Windermere. The professed magnetizer with his beaux yeux and extreme sensibility, unable to confer benefit without receiving injury, gave me yet another view of this grand subject. This apparently refers to the cele
J. W. Von Goethe (search for this): chapter 14
eries of works of early Italian art collected by Roscoe. Statue of Roscoe by Chantrey. Afternoon. Sweet place on the banks of the Mersey, called the Dingle. Feeling of the man of letters toward the man of money. Park laid out by Mr. Gates for use of the public, a very good means of doing good. Marriage of Mr. J. at Dr. H.'s. Peculiar management of Fleas! Mrs. H. the translator of Spiridion. Fine heads of Godwin, Herwegh, Hoffmann von Fallersleben, Rachel. Splendid full length of Goethe, which I want for myself. Mem. to get a fine head of Rachel for Caroline. Herwegh, too, perhaps. Head of Catharina of Russia. Colossal and Ideal head of Beethoven. Early letters of Carlyle, written in the style of the Life of Schiller, occasionally swelling into that of Dr. Johnson. Very low views of life, comfortable and prudential advice as to marriage, envy of riches, thirst for fame avowed as a leading motive. Tuesday. Pay up bill. Great expensiveness of the Adelphi. Route
H. H. Milman (search for this): chapter 14
about Eddie [Edward Spring]. Many such little things show us how natural is the disgust of the English to the bad manners and careless habits they find in America. Their ways of driving over these excellent roads are even amusing from their care. Evening at Mrs. Derby's, sister-in-law of Sir Humphrey. Her mother, aged seventy-six, a fine specimen of what I have heard of the Scotch lady. Next day drive with Mrs. P. Handsome dwellings on the banks of Windermere. Evening at Miss M.'s. Mr. Milman, Dr. Gregory. Stories about Hartley Coleridge, and account of Sara C., author of Phantasmion. Note the chapter she has added to the Aids to Reflection now about to be published. It seems the cause of Coleridge's separation from his wife and family was wholly with himself: because his opium and his indolence prevented his making any exertions to support them. That burden fell on Southey, who, without means, except from his pen, sustained the four persons thus added to his family. Jus
his opium and his indolence prevented his making any exertions to support them. That burden fell on Southey, who, without means, except from his pen, sustained the four persons thus added to his family. Just as I might do for — if I would. Hartley Coleridge's bad habits naturally inherited from his father. Waiter offers to keep the talking gentleman to board him, to clothe him. Oh don't, don't take away the talking gentleman! How wicked to transmit these morbid states to children! Mr. Mailman's hard and worldly estimate. Introduced to Dr. Gregory. A man of truly large, benevolent mind. Next day Grasmere, Rydal Mount. I was disappointed in the habitation of Wordsworth. It is almost the least beautiful spot hereabout. Remarks of our landlady about W. how pleasing, constantly ending with And Mrs. Wordsworth, too. And really, ma'am, I think it is because he is so kind a neighbor. Windermere. The professed magnetizer with his beaux yeux and extreme sensibility, unab
oughrigg, a most enchanting place, dear to Wordsworth. Thursday. Romantic story of our landlady's husband, quite in my line. Walk along the hills, little ravine, arched bridge, and brook rushing beneath it. Delightful walk over the fields past Fox How. Speak of Dr. Arnold and the justice done him all around. Said to have made a happy and equal marriage. Visit to Wordsworth. Evening at the Greys'. Cultivated and liberal mind of the manufacturer. Ditto of the country gentleman. Countess Hahn Hahn had just been at Ambleside. Wednesday. To Langdale. Scaurfell the scene of the Excursion. Rothay church. First fall lunch in the farm-house. Dungeon Ghyll Force. Most enchanting view at last. As fine a day as I ever had. Account in evening by tedious Miss Briggs of the ease with which one may be lost in the mist. This 26th was Eddie's birthday. Thursday. Farewell to Ambleside. A happy eight days we have had here. Ms. Note-Book. Portions of a more complete narrative,
Thomas Carlyle (search for this): chapter 14
ller], 6 State Street, Boston, which day you will come. I should like to take the letter to Carlyle, and wish you would name the Springs in it. Mr. S. has been one of those much helped by Mr. C. haps. Head of Catharina of Russia. Colossal and Ideal head of Beethoven. Early letters of Carlyle, written in the style of the Life of Schiller, occasionally swelling into that of Dr. Johnson. h, De Quincey, Joanna Baillie. Browning, just married, had gone to Italy. Her descriptions of Carlyle are almost as spicy as Carlyle's own letters, and she dismisses Lewes in almost as trenchant a Carlyle's own letters, and she dismisses Lewes in almost as trenchant a manner as that in which Carlyle dismissed Heraud. Best of all for her, she made acquaintance with Mazzini, whom she was soon to meet again in Italy. She was very cordially received, her two volumesCarlyle dismissed Heraud. Best of all for her, she made acquaintance with Mazzini, whom she was soon to meet again in Italy. She was very cordially received, her two volumes of Miscellanies having just been favorably reviewed by the English press; she was inundated with invitations and opportunities, and could only mourn, like so many Americans since her day, that thes
Samuel Brown (search for this): chapter 14
gh imaginations. I liked him much, and his pictures from him, though there was not one which, taken by itself, could be called really good. Note here, not that it has to do anything with these matters, but because I happen to think of it here, that the tune of Scots wha hae is, according to tradition, the original one of Hey tutti Taiti, to which the Scots did actually march to the field of Bannockburn. Shoemaker amazed at the N. Y. [New York] shoes. Evening at Mrs. Crowe's. S. B. [Samuel Brown.] D. S. [David Scott.] Mr. De Quincey. Pleasant flow of talk, but the Opium Eater did not get into his gorgeous style. Good story told by S. B. about Burns. Write it out for Tribune and quote the pertinent verse. This story may be found in Memoirs, II. 177; and the Tribune letter in At Home and Abroad, p. 139. I was very sorry to leave Edina now; might have had such good times with the two friends. Her view of Mary Queen of Scots is put in too striking a manner to be omitted--
She was very cordially received, her two volumes of Miscellanies having just been favorably reviewed by the English press; she was inundated with invitations and opportunities, and could only mourn, like so many Americans since her day, that these delightful hospitalities encroached sadly upon the time to be given to galleries and museums. In Paris she saw La Mennais, Beranger, and George Sand; went constantly to the lectures, galleries, and Chamber of Deputies; saw Rachel act and heard Chopin play. She found her Essay on American literature translated and published in La Revue Independante, though the satisfaction was mitigated by having her name announced as Elizabeth. She worked away at learning colloquial French until she spoke it fluently, though not accurately; and her teacher pleased her by saying that her accent was like that of an Italian, though this from French lips can never be much of a compliment. Yet with her deep love for Italy she was probably pleased at the th
A. L. Johnson (search for this): chapter 14
f doing good. Marriage of Mr. J. at Dr. H.'s. Peculiar management of Fleas! Mrs. H. the translator of Spiridion. Fine heads of Godwin, Herwegh, Hoffmann von Fallersleben, Rachel. Splendid full length of Goethe, which I want for myself. Mem. to get a fine head of Rachel for Caroline. Herwegh, too, perhaps. Head of Catharina of Russia. Colossal and Ideal head of Beethoven. Early letters of Carlyle, written in the style of the Life of Schiller, occasionally swelling into that of Dr. Johnson. Very low views of life, comfortable and prudential advice as to marriage, envy of riches, thirst for fame avowed as a leading motive. Tuesday. Pay up bill. Great expensiveness of the Adelphi. Route from Liverpool to Lancaster. From the latter canal boat to Kendal. Beautiful picture presented by the young Bengalese, our fellow-traveler. Cordial talk of English gentleman. Silly German, with his horrid chat and smirk. His foolish way of addressing an intelligent child. Kendal, t
ing that her accent was like that of an Italian, though this from French lips can never be much of a compliment. Yet with her deep love for Italy she was probably pleased at the thought of speaking French like an Italian, just as Englishmen are said to be pleased at speaking it like Englishmen — which, to do them justice, they usually accomplish. On February 25, 1847, she left Paris for Italy, and in early spring established herself for a time in Rome. In summer she went to the different Italian cities, then to Switzerland. In October she settled herself for the winter in Rome, whose wonderful inspiration she profoundly felt. She says of her own first experiences there, All mean things were forgotten in the joy that rushed over me like a flood. She felt, as so many Americans feel in Europe, an impulse to separate herself for a time from all English-speaking people and plunge into a wholly untried atmosphere. She had new and interesting friends, such as the Milanese Madame Arco
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