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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders.. Search the whole document.

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France (France) (search for this): chapter 11
d fix it unanimously upon the issues of a single incident. The Trent affair. On the 8th of November, Capt. Wilkes, of the United States steam sloop-of-war San Jacinto, overhauled the English mail steamer Trent in the Bahama Channel, and demanded the surrender of the Confederate emissaries, Messrs. Mason and Slidell, who were passengers on board that vessel, and were proceeding with their secretaries on a mission representing the interests of the Confederacy at the courts of England and France. The San Jacinto had fired a shot across the bows of the mail steamer to bring her to, and as she did not stop for that, had fired a shell which burst close by her. The unarmed vessel was boarded by a party of marines under command of Lieut. Fairfax, who demanded the persons of the commissioners and their secretaries; and on their claiming the protection of the British flag, and refusing to leave it unless by actual physical force, hands were laid o i Mr. Mason, Lieut. Fairfax and another
Dranesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
tions in Washington. Morale of McClellan's army. the affair at Dranesville. defeat of Stuart, Stonewall Jackson's new command. his expeof Fairfax and Loudon counties; and while a column moved towards Dranesville, he ordered Gen. Stone, commanding on the line of the Potomac, naddressed them thus: Gentlemen, the enemy are approaching by the Dranesville road, sixteen thousand strong, with twenty pieces of artillery. army was at once put in motion across Goose Creek and along the Dranesville road, anticipating a desperate engagement with the Federal columit was designed to draw the Confederates from Leesburg along the Dranesville road, while Stone crossed the river and occupied the town. Geng of about twenty-five hundred men, fell in with the enemy near Dranesville. The Federals were in superiour force; Gen. Ord's brigade, whicss in killed and wounded was about two hundred. The affair of Dranesville was the last conflict of arms of any note that occurred near the
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ortable sleep was under stick arbours packed with snow. Amid the sharp distresses of this march the command struggled on with patient courage, and almost superhuman spirit. On arriving at Bath, they found the Federals had retreated to the Potomac, and had waded the river on one of the coldest days of winter. Having rested two or three days in Bath, Jackson made daily demonstrations at the river to induce the belief that his command was the advance of a large force about to cross into Maryland. The demonstration succeeded even beyond his expectations. The Federal troops in and around Romney amounted to eleven thousand men, under command of Gen. Shields. This officer felt so certain that Jackson was bent on crossing the Potomac, that, though forty miles above, he transferred his whole command to the north bank to dispute the supposed passage. As soon as Jackson was informed of this, he marched up the south bank to Romney, surprised and captured many of the enemy, and destroyed
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
se all her sea-ports. two naval expeditions down the Carolina coast. engagement at Hatteras Inlet. an unequal combat. the Port Royal expedition. capture of Port Royal. value of this Federal success. the Trent affair. capture of commissioners Mason and Slidell. an English commander's protest. great indignation in England. November the fleet was descried approaching the southern coast of South Carolina; and then for the first time it became apparent that the point they sought was Port Royal harbour. To defend the harbour and approaches to Beaufort, the Confederates had erected two sand forts-one at Hilton Head, called Fort Walker, and the other at lost about one hundred in killed and wounded, all their cannon, a number of small arms, and all the stores collected in and around the forts. The capture of Port Royal was an important Federal success. It gave to the enemy a point for his squadrons to find shelter, and a convenient naval depot. It gave him also a foothold in
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Scott publicly announced himself an old coward for having yielded to popular clamour in fighting the battle, and thus sought by the most infamous confession the mercy of men prompt to insult his fallen fortunes. The fickle course of popular applause in the North was to exalt a new idol, and to designate a new victim. The clamour was for young commanders. Gen. George B. McClellan had been lifted into a sudden popularity by the indifferent affair of Rich Mountain. He was a graduate of West Point; had been one of the Military Commission sent to the Crimea; and just before the war had been employing his genius as superintendent of a railroad. He was now to take command of the Federal forces on the line of the Potomac, and to find himself suddenly exalted in the newspapers to comparisons with Alexander, Caesar, Hannibal and Napoleon the Great. The volatile, superficial and theatrically-inclined mind of the North is, perhaps, in nothing more strikingly displayed than in its demons
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
e Federal navy embraced three hundred and eighty-six ships and steamers, carrying three thousand and twenty-seven guns. Keels were laid not only in the Eastern ship-yards, but on the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers; iron armour was prepared; mortar ketches were built; the founderies and shops worked day and night upon engines, plates, and guns. While this wonderful energy was being displayed by the North in preparations to operate against our sea-coast, and by fleets of gunboats on the Upper Mississippi and its tributaries, to drive our armies out of Kentucky and Tennessee, the Confederate Government showed a singular apathy with respect to any work of defence. The Confederate Congress had made large appropriations for the construction of gunboats on the Mississippi waters; there was the best navy-yard on the continent opposite Norfolk; there were valuable armouries with their machinery at Richmond; and although the Confederate Government was very far from competing with the naval re
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
arture. So formidable an armament had never before assembled in the waters of America. The naval force was under the command of Capt. Dupont, flag-officer of the Sident. The Trent affair. On the 8th of November, Capt. Wilkes, of the United States steam sloop-of-war San Jacinto, overhauled the English mail steamer Trent iovernment, approved the resentful demand which it proposed to make upon the United States, and suggested that ship-owners should instruct the captains of outward-bound vessels to signalize any English vessels, that war with America was probable. The Liverpool underwriters approved the suggestion. The British Government made acbinet with an unanimous resolution that, under no circumstances, should the United States surrender Messrs. Slidell and Mason? Why did they encourage the popular sehat England's non-observation of the Treaty of Paris was a deception for the Confederate States, and an ambuscade for the interests of commerce throughout the world.
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
an's designs. the Confederates fall back to Centreville. the battle of Leesburg. McClellan's movement on the Confederate left. Evans' brigade. fortunate capture of a Federal courier. the Federals cross the Potomac and occupy Ball's Bluff. splendid charge of the Confederates. death of Col. Baker. the enemy driven into the River. an appalling spectacle of death. misrepresentations in Washington. Morale of McClellan's army. the affair at Dranesville. defeat of Stuart, Stonewall Jackson's new command. his expedition from Winchester.Terrible sufferings of his command. his demonstration at Bath. his movement to Romney, and return to Winchester. close of the first year's campaign in Virginia. naval operations in 1861. the enemy's immense advantage in his navy. statistics of the Federal navy. improvidence of the Confederates in coast and River defences. Secretary Mallory. the Confederacy to lose all her sea-ports. two naval expeditions down the Carolina coast. enga
Evansport (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
, Jackson returned with his army to Winchester. The success of his expedition was complete; but it had been terribly purchased, for hundreds of his brave men had sunk under the exposure of the march, or were long on the sick-list from its effects. With this movement closed the campaign of the winter in Virginia. The armies of Johnston and Beauregard, at Centreville and Manassas, of Huger, at Norfolk, of Magruder on the Peninsula, of Jackson at Winchester, and the bodies of troops from Evansport to Acquia on the Potomac, in the Alleghany Mountains and around Richmond, rested for a season in their winter quarters; and fields of Virginia soon to run red with blood, were now covered with mantles of snow and ice. Naval operations in 1861. The Federals had one immense and peculiar advantage in the war; and they were prompt to use it. The superiourity which a large navy gave them may be estimated when we reflect that the sea-coast of the Confederacy stretched in a continuous line
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
dable an armament had never before assembled in the waters of America. The naval force was under the command of Capt. Dupont, flag-officer of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron; it consisted of fifteen war-steamers; the land force was embarked in thirty steam vessels and six sailing ships, and was under the command of Gen. T. W. Sherman. The whole force fell very little below twenty-five thousand men. On the 3d of November the fleet was descried approaching the southern coast of South Carolina; and then for the first time it became apparent that the point they sought was Port Royal harbour. To defend the harbour and approaches to Beaufort, the Confederates had erected two sand forts-one at Hilton Head, called Fort Walker, and the other at Bay Point, called Fort Beauregard. The first had sixteen guns mounted, most of them thirty-two pounders. Fort Beauregard mounted eight guns, none of the heaviest calibre. The garrisons and forces in the vicinity, numbering about three tho
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