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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders.. Search the whole document.

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Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
igate Merrimac, which vessel had been scuttled and sunk by the Federals on their abandonment of Norfolk at the opening of the war, into a shot-proof steam battery, constructed with inclined iron-platlonger safe to remain in that position. At 7 P. M., the Virginia hauled off, and returned to Norfolk, reserving for another day the completion of her work. She had already in a single half-day ac had already disabled the frigate, she retired slowly from the scene of contest and returned to Norfolk. The results of this day were indecisive, although there can be no doubt of the retreat of tent of iron-clads, were never again engaged in contest. The first continued by her presence at Norfolk to guard the entry into James River, and was thought of such importance with respect to the Penught. So far the Burnside expedition had been a train of success. The Confederate position at Norfolk had been flanked; complete possession had been gained of Albemarle and Pamlico Sound; and now,
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 13
e no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so. This assurance was again repeated after the commencement of hostilities, as if there was the most anxious purpose to obtain the ear of the Southern people on the subject, and to impress the world with the just and moderate designs of the war. In his letter of April, 1861, to the Federal minister at Paris, intended as a diplomatic circular for the courts of Europe, and an authoritative exposition of the objects and spirit of tile war on the Northern side, Mr. Seward, by direction of the President, wrote: ( The condition of slavery in the several States will remain just the same, whether it succeeds or fails. The rights of the States, and the condition of every human being in them, will remain subject to exactly the same laws and form of administration, whether the revolution shall succeed or
Big Lick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
t the stern. The other vessels of the Confederate squadron in the James river, under command of Captain Buchanan, were the Patrick Henry, six guns; the Jamestown, two guns; the Raleigh, the Beaufort and the Teazer, each of one gun. At the time of which we write a considerable naval force of the enemy had been collected in Hampton Roads, off Fortress Monroe. The fleet consisted of the Cumberland, of 24 guns; the Congress, 50 guns; the St. Lawrence, 50 guns; the steam-frigates Minnesota and Roanoke, 40 guns; and was under the command of Captain Marston, of the Roanoke. The Cumberland and the Congress lay off Newport News, about three hundred yards from the shore; the Congress about two hundred yards south of the Cumberland; whilst the remainder of the fleet were anchored off Fortress Monroe, about nine miles east of Newport News. With the force of twenty guns, Capt. Buchanan proposed to engage this formidable fleet, besides the enemy's batteries at Newport News, and several small st
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 13
ries. The new actor on the scene which had come in such a dramatic coincidence was a defensive structure, the invention of John Ericsson. He had named the invention the Monitor, in order to admonish the South of the fate of the rebellion, Great Britain of her fading naval supremacy, and the English government of the folly of spending millions in fixed fortifications for defence. She was different in appearance from any vessel that had previously been used in war. Her deck, unprotected by amight be repaired in a few hours. With reference to this wonderful contest in Hampton Roads the newspapers announced the conclusion that wooden ships were to be of no farther use in naval warfare, and that the great navies which France and Great Britain had built at such an immense cost were practically annihilated. Whatever haste there might be in this conclusion, the Government at Washington showed its early appreciation of the lesson in Hampton Roads. Almost immediately on the result of
e to obtain the ear of the Southern people on the subject, and to impress the world with the just and moderate designs of the war. In his letter of April, 1861, to the Federal minister at Paris, intended as a diplomatic circular for the courts of Europe, and an authoritative exposition of the objects and spirit of tile war on the Northern side, Mr. Seward, by direction of the President, wrote: ( The condition of slavery in the several States will remain just the same, whether it succeeds or failron vessels, both for coast and harbour defences, and also for offensive operations against the enemy's forts. The two combatants — the Virginia and the Monitor — which had given a sensation to the whole world, and turned the attention of every European government that had a strip of sea-coast to defend to the experiment of iron-clads, were never again engaged in contest. The first continued by her presence at Norfolk to guard the entry into James River, and was thought of such importance with
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Richmond in this direction, named as one of the preliminary conditions of the new campaign that this vessel should be neutralized. She was to be neutralized in a way little expected by the Confederate public. We may find in the close of this chapter an apppropriate place for a summary account of some other naval events belonging to this period of time in our narrative. Capture of Newbern, &c. The objects of Gen. Burnside's expedition were not accomplished with the capture of Roanoke Island. These objects, as stated in a memorandum furnished by Gen. McClellan, who directed the expedition as part of a general campaign for 1862, were an assault on Newbern, and, if possible, the destruction of the southern line of railroad through Goldsboroa, and the Wilmington and Weldon railroad. The town of Beaufort, defended by Fort Macon, was next to be attacked, and the port opened, whilst operations against Wilmington were pointed to as the eventual objects of the expedition. On Marc
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
y would crush any attempt at servile insurrection. Gen. McDowell issued an order forbidding fugitive slaves from coming into, or being harboured within his lines. When on the 31st of August, 1861, Gen. Fremont, in Missouri, issued an order declaring the negro slaves within his military department to be free men, it was instantly repudiated and nullified at Washington. At a later period, Gen. Hunter, commanding the Department of the South, issued an order putting the States of Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida under martial law, and declaring that, as slavery and martial law were incompatible, the slaves in those States were forever free. Mr. Lincoln set aside this declaration, and made it an occasion of rebuke to the pragmatical commander, who had thus attempted to extend to political objects the police regulations of armies and camps. It is remarkable how this affectation of non-interference with slavery was laid aside by successive measures of the Federal Government, until
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Federal navy. what McClellan thought of the Virginia. capture of Newbern, &c. objects of Burnside's expedition. branch's command at NewbeNewbern. the Confederate works on the Neuse River. retreat of branch. Federal occupation of Newbern. capture of Fort Macon. the entire coast Newbern. capture of Fort Macon. the entire coast of North Carolina in possession of the enemy. the sea-coast an unimportant part of the Confederate defences The series of disasters thatbelonging to this period of time in our narrative. Capture of Newbern, &c. The objects of Gen. Burnside's expedition were not accompledition as part of a general campaign for 1862, were an assault on Newbern, and, if possible, the destruction of the southern line of railroack. The troops were disembarked the next day eighteen miles below Newbern, and at daylight of the 14th advanced upon the Confederate works f one hundred and fifty. Shortly after the enemy's occupation of Newbern, the town of Washington, situated at the mouth of Tar River, fell
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ation of the Permanent Government of the Confederate States. gloomy scene in Capitol square. Presi re-enlist. the conscription law of the Confederate States. its timely passage. its provisions anation of the Permanent Government of the Confederate States. It was only a difference of name betwerotect the whole of the territory of the Confederate States, sea-board and inland. To the popular cf animated resolution on the part of the Confederate States was the development at Washington of theclaim to him, any law of a State or of the United States to the contrary notwithstanding. The ad resolution was passed, declaring that the United States ought to co-operate with any State which ms were summed up by the Treasurer of the Confederate States as less than two millions of dollars! the authorities of this State and of the Confederate States, without the slightest regard to such theen that the Permanent Government of the Confederate States was inaugurated at a dark period of its [1 more...]
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
nclined iron-plated sides and submerged ends. The plates to protect her sides were prepared at the Tredegar Iron Works at Richmond; and their inclination and thickness, and form, were determined by actual experiment. The eaves of the casemates as well as the ends of vessels were submerged, and a ram was added as a weapon of offence. This novel naval structure carried ten guns, eight broadside, one at the bow, and one at the stern. The other vessels of the Confederate squadron in the James river, under command of Captain Buchanan, were the Patrick Henry, six guns; the Jamestown, two guns; the Raleigh, the Beaufort and the Teazer, each of one gun. At the time of which we write a considerable naval force of the enemy had been collected in Hampton Roads, off Fortress Monroe. The fleet consisted of the Cumberland, of 24 guns; the Congress, 50 guns; the St. Lawrence, 50 guns; the steam-frigates Minnesota and Roanoke, 40 guns; and was under the command of Captain Marston, of the Roano
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