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Manchester (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 193
that long-sighted benevolence which sweeps the field for distant objects of compassion, while it is blind as a bat to the misery around its own doors. Well said! I saw and felt it all when I went through the streets and lanes and cellars of Manchester, where fifty thousand blanched skeleton men, women, and children were, slowly or rapidly, dying of starvation. In that city, also, vast anti-slavery meetings were got up to induce the North to put down slavery in the South. These assemblages r the auspices of the aristocracy, and they were held where the police were stationed at the doorways to drive off the famishing, lest their plaint of hunger might salute the ears of their bloated task-masters. There was no lack of cotton in Manchester then. There was something worse than that. It was the same old complaint you will find in any part of England,—the poor over-worked and under-fed to make the rich richer and the poor poorer. I went up to Paisley, where more than half the p
British Isles (search for this): chapter 193
s of your life? And will you, to accomplish this purpose, trample on all the canons of international law, and become public robber and go and steal this cotton? If you attempt it, will you succeed? How much cotton would you get before your ministry went down?—Before you lost a market for your commerce with twenty-three million freemen?—Before our breadstuffs, which are now keeping the wolf away from British doors, would reach your shores?—Before bread-riots would occur throughout the British Islands which would make you turn pale?—Before all seas would swarm with our privateers,—now twenty-fold more numerous than in 1812, when you found them too fleet and too strong for you?—Before you encountered, in addition to two millions of our native soldiers and sailors, half a million of adopted citizens,—able-bodied men, formerly British subjects, and burning to avenge the wrongs of centuries inflicted on their devoted Island? My lord, do you plead that the exigencies of statesma
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 193
Xlii. This English crusade against the United States was got up by the British aristocracy in sheer animosity against our Government,—not so much, perhaps, against our people, chiefly because they cared nothing about them. It was our system of you have resorted to the very last trick to keep there. You have, if an out, always paraded your friendship for the United States, and virulently assailed any Tory or Conservative ministry. In again, you first veered, then hesitated, then tacked,f that accursed institution, and sanctify the revival of the African slavetrade. You are threatening war against the United States unless we will surrender two intercepted traitors on their way to your abolition arms and sympathies, the chiefest emin eight short years—and chiefly through the influence of Charles Sumner—she would be forced to yield to arbitration, and branded by an impartial Tribunal as a public enemy of the United States, and condemned to pay exemplary damages for her
e soldiers and sailors, half a million of adopted citizens,—able-bodied men, formerly British subjects, and burning to avenge the wrongs of centuries inflicted on their devoted Island? My lord, do you plead that the exigencies of statesmanship demand that you should turn the arms of the earth against you? Do you suppose that Napoleon would lose such a chance for avenging Waterloo? Or Russia for taking Constantinople? Or all despotisms for crushing your supremacy? Or all the peoples of Europe for crushing monarchy? It would seem that England should be willing, at least, to let us manage our domestic affairs, since she has incurred a quarter of her national debt in interfering with them;—that she should not now take to her arms the foul corpse of African slavery on our soil, when it cost her five hundred million dollars to get rid of it in her own territories! Should not the Founder of Modern Liberty be glad to see how prosperously the brood of her young eagles had founded an
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 193
d them too fleet and too strong for you?—Before you encountered, in addition to two millions of our native soldiers and sailors, half a million of adopted citizens,—able-bodied men, formerly British subjects, and burning to avenge the wrongs of centuries inflicted on their devoted Island? My lord, do you plead that the exigencies of statesmanship demand that you should turn the arms of the earth against you? Do you suppose that Napoleon would lose such a chance for avenging Waterloo? Or Russia for taking Constantinople? Or all despotisms for crushing your supremacy? Or all the peoples of Europe for crushing monarchy? It would seem that England should be willing, at least, to let us manage our domestic affairs, since she has incurred a quarter of her national debt in interfering with them;—that she should not now take to her arms the foul corpse of African slavery on our soil, when it cost her five hundred million dollars to get rid of it in her own territories! Should not th<
Waterloo, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 193
when you found them too fleet and too strong for you?—Before you encountered, in addition to two millions of our native soldiers and sailors, half a million of adopted citizens,—able-bodied men, formerly British subjects, and burning to avenge the wrongs of centuries inflicted on their devoted Island? My lord, do you plead that the exigencies of statesmanship demand that you should turn the arms of the earth against you? Do you suppose that Napoleon would lose such a chance for avenging Waterloo? Or Russia for taking Constantinople? Or all despotisms for crushing your supremacy? Or all the peoples of Europe for crushing monarchy? It would seem that England should be willing, at least, to let us manage our domestic affairs, since she has incurred a quarter of her national debt in interfering with them;—that she should not now take to her arms the foul corpse of African slavery on our soil, when it cost her five hundred million dollars to get rid of it in her own territories! <
Paisley (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 193
ssemblages were invariably under the auspices of the aristocracy, and they were held where the police were stationed at the doorways to drive off the famishing, lest their plaint of hunger might salute the ears of their bloated task-masters. There was no lack of cotton in Manchester then. There was something worse than that. It was the same old complaint you will find in any part of England,—the poor over-worked and under-fed to make the rich richer and the poor poorer. I went up to Paisley, where more than half the population were being fed from soup-kettles,—and pretty poor soup at that. There, too, the abolition of American slavery seemed to be the only thing which drew forth the sympathies or reached the charity of the aristocratic classes. So everywhere in England it was, that long-sighted benevolence, sweeping the distant horizon for objects of compassion, but blind as a bat to the misery at the door. It was not so in 1840 alone. I have been in England several ti
You have all your life been a place-seeker or a place-holder. To get power and money, you have always turned your back on your friends, and let your Reform measures go to the dogs. Whenever you have been an out, and any American question came up, you were a warm advocate of our Republic. When you were an in, you changed your tone. When Liberty was at stake in a foreign nation, or at home, you have been its noisiest champion,—if an out. If an in, you have done your best to crush it, in Ireland, Hungary, Italy, Spain, and Poland. It was with a pang that you saw even old Greece become free. For half a century, if an out, you have brawled for Freedom and Free Governments; if an in, you have resorted to the very last trick to keep there. You have, if an out, always paraded your friendship for the United States, and virulently assailed any Tory or Conservative ministry. In again, you first veered, then hesitated, then tacked, and then attacked us, our Government, and all American
Hungary (Hungary) (search for this): chapter 193
all your life been a place-seeker or a place-holder. To get power and money, you have always turned your back on your friends, and let your Reform measures go to the dogs. Whenever you have been an out, and any American question came up, you were a warm advocate of our Republic. When you were an in, you changed your tone. When Liberty was at stake in a foreign nation, or at home, you have been its noisiest champion,—if an out. If an in, you have done your best to crush it, in Ireland, Hungary, Italy, Spain, and Poland. It was with a pang that you saw even old Greece become free. For half a century, if an out, you have brawled for Freedom and Free Governments; if an in, you have resorted to the very last trick to keep there. You have, if an out, always paraded your friendship for the United States, and virulently assailed any Tory or Conservative ministry. In again, you first veered, then hesitated, then tacked, and then attacked us, our Government, and all American things.
Poland (Poland) (search for this): chapter 193
e-seeker or a place-holder. To get power and money, you have always turned your back on your friends, and let your Reform measures go to the dogs. Whenever you have been an out, and any American question came up, you were a warm advocate of our Republic. When you were an in, you changed your tone. When Liberty was at stake in a foreign nation, or at home, you have been its noisiest champion,—if an out. If an in, you have done your best to crush it, in Ireland, Hungary, Italy, Spain, and Poland. It was with a pang that you saw even old Greece become free. For half a century, if an out, you have brawled for Freedom and Free Governments; if an in, you have resorted to the very last trick to keep there. You have, if an out, always paraded your friendship for the United States, and virulently assailed any Tory or Conservative ministry. In again, you first veered, then hesitated, then tacked, and then attacked us, our Government, and all American things. You know our Republic has n
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