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Browsing named entities in a specific section of C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874.. Search the whole document.

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Algerine (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 51
tion itself assumes two different forms, one founded on a prophetic malediction in the Old Testament, and the other on the professed observations of recent science. Its importance is apparent in the obvious fact, that, unless such distinction be clearly and unmistakably established, every argument by which our own freedom is vindicated,—every applause awarded to the successful rebellion of our fathers,—every indignant word ever hurled against the enslavement of our white fellow-citizens by Algerine corsairs, must plead trumpet-tongued against the deep damnation of Slavery, whether white or black. It is said that the Africans are the posterity of Ham, the son of Noah, through Canaan, who was cursed by Noah, to be the servant of his brethren, and that this malediction has fallen upon all his descendants, including the unhappy Africans,—who are accordingly devoted by God, through unending generations, to unending bondage. Such is the favorite argument often put forth at the South, an<
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 51
from slave-masters themselves. Not on triumphant story, not even on indisputable facts, do I now accuse Slavery, but on its character, as revealed in its own simple definition of itself. Out of its own mouth do I condemn it. By the law of Slavery, man, created in the image of God, is divested of his human character, and declared to be a mere chattel. That this statement may not seem to be put forward without precise authority, I quote the law of two different States. The civil code of Louisiana thus defines a slave: A slave is one who is in the power of a master to whom he belongs. The master may sell him, dispose of his person, his industry, and his labor. He can do nothing, possess nothing, nor acquire anything but what must belong to his master.—Civil Code, Art. 35. The law of another polished slave State gives this definition: Slaves shall be deemed, sold, taken, reputed and adjudged in law to be chattels personal, in the hands of their owners and possessors, an
China (China) (search for this): chapter 51
their several distinct characteristics; and it has been audaciously argued that the African is so far inferior, as to lose all title to that liberty which is the birthright of the lordly white. Now I have neither time nor disposition on this occasion to discuss the question of the unity of the races; nor is it necessary to my present purpose. It may be that the different races of men proceeded from different stocks; but there is but one great Human Family, in which Caucasian and African, Chinese and Indian, are all brothers, children of one Father, and heirs to one happiness,—alike on earth and in heaven. Star-eyed science cannot shake this everlasting truth. It may vainly exhibit peculiarities in the African, by which he is distinguishable from the Caucasian. It may, in his physical form and intellectual character, presume to find the stamp of permanent inferiority. But by no reach of learning, by no torture of fact, by no effrontery of dogma, can it show that he is not a man.
Stroud (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 51
s and possessors, and their executors, administrators and assigns, to all intents, constructions and purposes whatsoever.—2 Brev. Dig. 229. (South Carolina.) And a careful writer, Judge Stroud, in a work of juridical as well as philanthropic merit, thus sums up the law: The cardinal principle of Slavery—that the slave is not to be ranked among sentient beings, but among things—is an article of property—a chattel personal—obtains as undoubted law in all of these (the slave) States.— Stroud's Laws of Slavery, 22. Sir, this is enough. As out of its small egg crawls forth the slimy, scaly, reptile crocodile, so out of this simple definition crawls forth the whole slimy, scaly, reptile monstrosity, by which a man is changed into a chattel,—a person is converted into a thing,—a soul is transmuted into merchandise. According to this very definition, the slave is held simply for the good of his master, to whose behests, his life, liberty and happiness are devoted, an
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 51
pose of his person, his industry, and his labor. He can do nothing, possess nothing, nor acquire anything but what must belong to his master.—Civil Code, Art. 35. The law of another polished slave State gives this definition: Slaves shall be deemed, sold, taken, reputed and adjudged in law to be chattels personal, in the hands of their owners and possessors, and their executors, administrators and assigns, to all intents, constructions and purposes whatsoever.—2 Brev. Dig. 229. (South Carolina.) And a careful writer, Judge Stroud, in a work of juridical as well as philanthropic merit, thus sums up the law: The cardinal principle of Slavery—that the slave is not to be ranked among sentient beings, but among things—is an article of property—a chattel personal—obtains as undoubted law in all of these (the slave) States.— Stroud's Laws of Slavery, 22. Sir, this is enough. As out of its small egg crawls forth the slimy, scaly, reptile crocodile, so out of this
Canaan, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 51
hat the Africans are the posterity of Ham, the son of Noah, through Canaan, who was cursed by Noah, to be the servant of his brethren, and thahich are so strangely employed: And he (Noah) said, cursed be Canaan: a servant of servants shall he be unto his brethren. And he said, Blessed be the Lord God of Shem; and Canaan shall be his servant. God shall enlarge Japheth, and he shall dwell in the tents of Shem, and CaCanaan shall be his servant.— Genesis, chap. IX. 25-27. That is all; and I need only read these words in order to expose the whole transpicn the chain of the African slave; first, that, by this malediction, Canaan himself was actually changed into a chattel, whereas, he is simply made the servant of his brethren; secondly, that not merely Canaan, but all his posterity, to the remotest generation, was so changed, whereaent; thirdly, that the African actually belongs to the posterity of Canaan,—an ethnographical assumption absurdly difficult to establish; four
is labor. He can do nothing, possess nothing, nor acquire anything but what must belong to his master.—Civil Code, Art. 35. The law of another polished slave State gives this definition: Slaves shall be deemed, sold, taken, reputed and adjudged in law to be chattels personal, in the hands of their owners and possessors, and their executors, administrators and assigns, to all intents, constructions and purposes whatsoever.—2 Brev. Dig. 229. (South Carolina.) And a careful writer, Judge Stroud, in a work of juridical as well as philanthropic merit, thus sums up the law: The cardinal principle of Slavery—that the slave is not to be ranked among sentient beings, but among things—is an article of property—a chattel personal—obtains as undoubted law in all of these (the slave) States.— Stroud's Laws of Slavery, 22. Sir, this is enough. As out of its small egg crawls forth the slimy, scaly, reptile crocodile, so out of this simple definition crawls forth the who
sm between Christianity and Slavery, in a few pregnant words which you will be glad to hear,—particularly as, I believe, they have not been before introduced into this discussion. By a principle essential to Christianity, says Coleridge, a person is eternally differenced from a thing; so that the idea of a Human Being necessarily excludes the idea of property in that Being. With regret, though not with astonishment, I learn that a Boston divine has sought to throw the seamless garment of Christ over this shocking wrong. But I am patient, and see clearly how vain will be his effort, when I call to mind, that, within this very century, other divines sought to throw the same seamless garment over the more shocking slave-trade; and that, among many publications, a little book was then put forth with the name of a reverend clergyman on the title-page, to prove that the African trade for negro slaves is consistent with the principles of humanity and revealed religion; and, thinking of t
form mutilated by the knife, or seared by red-hot iron; on the ferocious scent of blood-hounds in chase of human prey; on the sale of fathers and mothers, husbands and wives, brothers and sisters, little children—even infants—at the auction-block; on the practical prostration of all rights, all ties, and even all hope; on the deadly injury to morals, substituting concubinage for marriage, and changing the whole land of Slavery into a by-word of shame, only fitly pictured by the language of Dante when he called his own degraded country a House of Ill-Fame; and last of all, on the pernicious influence upon the master as well as the slave, showing itself too often, even by his own confession, in rudeness of manners and character, and especially in that blindness which renders him insensible to the wrongs he upholds, while he, so perfect is his misery, Not once perceives his foul disfigurement, But boasts himself more comely than before. On these things I do not dwell, although volu
he deep damnation of Slavery, whether white or black. It is said that the Africans are the posterity of Ham, the son of Noah, through Canaan, who was cursed by Noah, to be the servant of his brethren, and that this malediction has fallen upon all Noah, to be the servant of his brethren, and that this malediction has fallen upon all his descendants, including the unhappy Africans,—who are accordingly devoted by God, through unending generations, to unending bondage. Such is the favorite argument often put forth at the South, and more than once directly addressed to myself. Herupon Congress or the country. Listen now to the texts of the Old Testament which are so strangely employed: And he (Noah) said, cursed be Canaan: a servant of servants shall he be unto his brethren. And he said, Blessed be the Lord God of Sheity of an attempt to found this revolting wrong on Any successive title, long and dark, Drawn from the mouldy rolls of Noah's ark. The small bigotry which could find comfort in these texts, has been lately exalted by the voice of science, whi
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