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der propitious skies. It began in a new building erected for it at the corner of Amory and Summer streets, Edward Everett, president of Harvard College, giving the dedicatory address,—an eloquent and inspiring effort. There were at once overflowing numbers. The school committee, with stringent standards of admission in mind, had asked for a building for 60 pupils. The Common Council, taking a larger look at the future, provided for 108. The public, heedless of them both, furnished at the July examination for admission 107 pupils, 41 boys and 66 girls, and in September, when the school opened, 31 more. In 1864 the high school moved into its third home at the corner of Broadway and Fayette Street,—at that time one of the best equipped and most elegant schoolhouses in the State. In 1886, the high school was divided, its classical department becoming the Cambridge Latin School, and its remaining departments the Cambridge English High School. The Latin School was transferred to
, we shall make no use of it. This attitude, however, was not long maintained. In June, 1848, the high school of Old Cambridge was closed, and in the following September its pupils took their seats with the high school pupils of the rest of the city. Thus that classical instruction which began in the faire Grammar Schoole more took at the future, provided for 108. The public, heedless of them both, furnished at the July examination for admission 107 pupils, 41 boys and 66 girls, and in September, when the school opened, 31 more. In 1864 the high school moved into its third home at the corner of Broadway and Fayette Street,—at that time one of the beste it. The English High School retained the old building. The separation took place March 1, 1886, both schools continuing in charge of William F. Bradbury until September of that year, when Frank A. Hill entered upon his duties as head master of the English High School, Mr. Bradbury continuing as head master of the Latin School.
not generally resort to him. Boston, for instance, established reading and writing schools in 1682, the Latin School being the only public school in town down to that time. There was, however, no formal provision for girls in such schools until October 19, 1789, when the town voted that children of both sexes should be taught in the reading and writing schools of their newly reorganized system. Even then and for forty years thereafter Boston girls were excluded from these schools from October to April; and when finally, in 1828, they were graciously permitted to attend school, like the boys, all the year round, the policy of separating the sexes was begun,—a policy that is in vogue to-day in many grammar schools in the older sections of the city as well as in the four central high schools. Doubtless there were girls as well as boys in the early dame schools. These were private schools that received children of the kindergarten age, although they were far from being conducted
October 4th (search for this): chapter 23
One, as we have seen, was for girls. Inasmuch as it also contained girls of grammar school grades, it was as often called a high and grammar school as a high school. The high schools of Wards Two and Three were for both sexes, that of Ward Two being the only one in the town not associated with grammar school pupils. In 1847, the plan of uniting the high school pupils of the three wards was revived. A high school for the city (Cambridge had ceased to be a town May 4, 1846) was opened October 4 of that year in the high school building of Cambridgeport, with Elbridge Smith as master and Miss N. W. Manning as assistant. Seventy-four pupils were admitted, all but one from the Port and the Point. The single exception was the mayor's daughter from Old Cambridge. Members of the city council from Old Cambridge had said in substance to their associates, Place your high school where you choose, we shall make no use of it. This attitude, however, was not long maintained. In June, 1848
December 7th (search for this): chapter 23
indifferently taught, were all we got at a common town school in my day. The school that has come down to us from Elijah Corlett's was undoubtedly a grammar school for a long time in a double sense,—an English grammar school for Old Cambridge and a Latin grammar school for all Cambridge; and in popular allusions it was spoken of as a grammar school sometimes in one sense and sometimes in the other. That these were the facts in 1832 appears from this rule of the school committee adopted December 7 of that year: In addition to these studies (certain English branches mentioned in another rule), the instructor in Grammar School No. 1 (the Latin Grammar School on Garden Street) will teach to any children belonging to the town the rudiments of the Latin and Greek languages, and the studies generally preparatory for admission to college. Moreover, while the children of the colonial public schools were practically of one sex, it had come to be clearly understood long before 1832 that the
the young, and the methods of study are largely objective and experimental. In the primary schools there are 5087 pupils and 116 teachers. They are under the immediate supervision of a Special Teacher of Primary Schools, whose work is directed by the superintendent of schools. Miss Lelia A. Mirick, now Mrs. Frederick S. Cutter, was the first to hold this position, which was created in 1892. She was succeeded in 1895 by Miss Mary A. Lewis. The course of study is for three years. Of the 1159 pupils graduated in June, 1894, ten per cent. completed this course in less than three years, fifty-eight per cent. in three years, and thirty-two per cent. in more than three years. Regular instruction in botany has recently been introduced; also the Ling system of Swedish gymnastics. For eleven years Mrs. Quincy A. Shaw of Boston maintained three free kindergartens in Cambridge. A fourth was supported by a few Cambridge ladies. In 1889 the school committee assumed them as a part of th
all be intreated to become its master. Salem, Charlestown, and Dorchester also had schools before 1640. The conditions for the early existence of a school were as favorable in Cambridge as elsewhere in the colony. When the town was founded in 1631, the intention was to make it the fortified political centre of the colony. It speedily became instead an important residential and intellectual centre. A writer in 1637 pictures it with artless exaggeration as one of the neatest towns in New E. To these advantages may be added finally that indefinable atmosphere which comes from historic and literary associations unmatched elsewhere in the western world, the very breath of which is an education not to be despised. The Newtowne of 1631; the Harvard of 1636; the old burying ground where lie the early presidents of the college; the holiday routes of the British to Concord and Lexington; the bloody routes of their return; the elm where Washington took command of the army, the mansi
hool beginnings, the record of those beginnings would not be the scant and incomplete story that has come down to us. It is not until 1643 that we find any authentic account of a school in Cambridge. In that year the curtain suddenly rises on Elijah Corlett's faire Grammar Schoole, by the side of the college. There is abundant reason for believing, however, that Cambridge was not without a school for some years prior to this date. We catch a glimpse of the Boston Latin School as early as 1635, in the pathetic record of the town that our brother Philemon Pormort shall be intreated to become its master. Salem, Charlestown, and Dorchester also had schools before 1640. The conditions for the early existence of a school were as favorable in Cambridge as elsewhere in the colony. When the town was founded in 1631, the intention was to make it the fortified political centre of the colony. It speedily became instead an important residential and intellectual centre. A writer in 1637
towns in New England, with many fair structures and handsome contrived streets. The inhabitants, most of them, he adds, were very rich. We know from other sources that many of them had scholarly tastes. Moreover, Harvard College was founded in 1636, opened in 1638, and its first class of nine young men was graduated in 1642. In the work of fitting boys for Harvard, Cambridge would naturally have had an early and prominent share. It chimes in with this theory of an earlier school that Mr. Cges may be added finally that indefinable atmosphere which comes from historic and literary associations unmatched elsewhere in the western world, the very breath of which is an education not to be despised. The Newtowne of 1631; the Harvard of 1636; the old burying ground where lie the early presidents of the college; the holiday routes of the British to Concord and Lexington; the bloody routes of their return; the elm where Washington took command of the army, the mansion where he lived wit
1635, in the pathetic record of the town that our brother Philemon Pormort shall be intreated to become its master. Salem, Charlestown, and Dorchester also had schools before 1640. The conditions for the early existence of a school were as favorable in Cambridge as elsewhere in the colony. When the town was founded in 1631, the intention was to make it the fortified political centre of the colony. It speedily became instead an important residential and intellectual centre. A writer in 1637 pictures it with artless exaggeration as one of the neatest towns in New England, with many fair structures and handsome contrived streets. The inhabitants, most of them, he adds, were very rich. We know from other sources that many of them had scholarly tastes. Moreover, Harvard College was founded in 1636, opened in 1638, and its first class of nine young men was graduated in 1642. In the work of fitting boys for Harvard, Cambridge would naturally have had an early and prominent share.
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