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Broadway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
nsferred to the Lee Street church, which had been fitted up to receive it. The English High School retained the old building. The separation took place March 1, 1886, both schools continuing in charge of William F. Bradbury until September of that year, when Frank A. Hill entered upon his duties as head master of the English High School, Mr. Bradbury continuing as head master of the Latin School. In 1892 the English High School moved into its present commodious and beautiful building on Broadway, between Trowbridge and Ellery streets. This structure was erected on land presented to the city by Frederick H. Rindge and at a cost to the city of $230,000. In September, 1888, the Cambridge Manual Training School for Boys, founded and maintained by Mr. Rindge, and placed under the superintendence of Harry Ellis, was opened to the boys of the English High School. As soon as the building at the corner of Broadway and Fayette Street was vacated by the English High School, it was remod
Chelsea (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
rofane and impure language had diminished. The habit of truth-telling had gained ground. The duty of reverence was strongly urged in the report of 1845,—reverence to parents, to one's self, to teachers, to magistrates, and to all superiors in years and goodness. Classes were still too large for the teachers. Cambridge was still outstripped by twenty-three towns and cities of the Commonwealth in the amount of money raised per child for schooling, Somerville raising $7.64, Boston $6.76, Chelsea $5.58, Charlestown $5.09, Newton $4.26, and Cambridge $3.95. Still, Cambridge had risen from the thirty-fifth place the proceding year to the twenty-fourth, and that was cause for congratulation. The committee, however, did not think it should be an object of ambition what town will expend the most money, but what town can produce the best schools. Here the records must be dropped. Even in their fullness, the story they tell is somewhat meagre; and it is only a snatch or two from t
Mount Auburn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
goyne from New York marched into Cambridge; Hollis, Stoughton, Holworthy, and the rest,—the sometime homes of scores of men subsequently distinguished in their respective fields of service; the site of the gambrel-roofed house where Holmes was born; the stately home of Lowell among the pines and near the willows that stirred his muse; and doubly dear, with its memories of Washington as of the poet, that of Longfellow, with its vista of the sinuous Charles and the marshes beyond; beautiful Mount Auburn,—the Westminster Abbey of New England, where at every turn the names of the illustrious dead quicken one's memory of the history they shared in making,—these are but a part of the priceless heritage that is ours. Does the sense of their value ever become dull? Let the pilgrims that come to us in annually increasing numbers sharpen that sense, and nerve us to keep these memorials, so far as their keeping may be in our hands, as unique and sacred supplements of our educational facilitie<
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
d others, thus bringing the college and those that choose of the people into a touch helpful and inspiring to both. To these advantages may be added finally that indefinable atmosphere which comes from historic and literary associations unmatched elsewhere in the western world, the very breath of which is an education not to be despised. The Newtowne of 1631; the Harvard of 1636; the old burying ground where lie the early presidents of the college; the holiday routes of the British to Concord and Lexington; the bloody routes of their return; the elm where Washington took command of the army, the mansion where he lived with Lady Washington, the little church that both attended; the site of the ramparts thrown up in the siege of Boston; the winding road—old Tory Row—by which the army of Washington marched out of Cambridge for New York and by which, not long after, the army of Burgoyne from New York marched into Cambridge; Hollis, Stoughton, Holworthy, and the rest,—the sometime ho<
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
as 1825. In the same year a high school for girls was opened in Boston. Its very success was its defeat. It was crowded to overflowing, and scores were rejected. The citizens became alarmed. The threatened expense was enormous. Moreover, there were those who feared that girls in humble life would be educated beyond their station! In less than two years, in the flush of prosperity, the school was voted out of existence, not to be revived for a quarter of a century. Bishop Clark, of Rhode Island, informs me that the Lowell High School, which was founded in 1831, had girls as well as boys in its membership from the beginning. He was the first principal of the school, and speaks, therefore, with authority. New Bedford opened a high school for both sexes earlier still. Of the fourteen high schools reported to be in existence in 1838 in Massachusetts, there were several where co-education had been the rule for years. The higher education of girls was in the air. It was as much a
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 23
1, the intention was to make it the fortified political centre of the colony. It speedily became instead an important residential and intellectual centre. A writer in 1637 pictures it with artless exaggeration as one of the neatest towns in New England, with many fair structures and handsome contrived streets. The inhabitants, most of them, he adds, were very rich. We know from other sources that many of them had scholarly tastes. Moreover, Harvard College was founded in 1636, opened in 1nes and near the willows that stirred his muse; and doubly dear, with its memories of Washington as of the poet, that of Longfellow, with its vista of the sinuous Charles and the marshes beyond; beautiful Mount Auburn,—the Westminster Abbey of New England, where at every turn the names of the illustrious dead quicken one's memory of the history they shared in making,—these are but a part of the priceless heritage that is ours. Does the sense of their value ever become dull? Let the pilgrims
Dorchester, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
a school for some years prior to this date. We catch a glimpse of the Boston Latin School as early as 1635, in the pathetic record of the town that our brother Philemon Pormort shall be intreated to become its master. Salem, Charlestown, and Dorchester also had schools before 1640. The conditions for the early existence of a school were as favorable in Cambridge as elsewhere in the colony. When the town was founded in 1631, the intention was to make it the fortified political centre of theven Greek in the college classes of the school. It was doubtless such a school as Edward Everett described in his address at the dedication of the Cambridge High School building, June 27, 1848. He remembered as yesterday (Everett was born in Dorchester in 1794) his first going to the village school, how he trudged along at the valiant age of three, one hand grasping his elder sister's apron, and the other his little blue paper-covered primer, and how, when a traveler, stranger, or person in y
Cambridgeport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
was hopeless for them to enter there, like Margaret Fuller, of Cambridgeport, subsequently Countess Ossoli, who in 1816, at the age of six, from them. Children in our high and grammar schools [those of Cambridgeport and East Cambridge] are as decidedly delicate and respectful inschool classes being transferred to the central high school, in Cambridgeport, and the other classes remaining under the name of the Auburn Gmbridge High schools. In 1838 a high school was organized in Cambridgeport for the entire town, in a building erected for it at the cornerhe town high school for five years, drew its pupils mainly from Cambridgeport. In 1843, the Otis schoolhouse, quite a magnificent structuras opened October 4 of that year in the high school building of Cambridgeport, with Elbridge Smith as master and Miss N. W. Manning as assistong and fruitlessly sought to make the high school organized in Cambridgeport in 1838 a high school for the town rather than for Ward Two had
Gay Head (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ogrammes, and the entire scale of humble school expenditure are seemingly gone forever, not simply in Cambridge, but in all Massachusetts communities of consequence. Were Cambridge suddenly and alone to go back to those Arcadian times when it cost her only $3.95 per pupil for instruction, she would drop from the thirty-sixth place which she holds to-day in the list of three hundred and fifty-three Massachusetts towns and cities to the three hundred and fifty-second, with the Indian town of Gay Head at the foot to keep her company, while the expenditure of $44.76 per pupil by number one in the list would seem to them both unpardonable extravagance. The educational advantages of Cambridge are by no means exhausted with this meagre account of the public schools. There are private schools of many grades, some of them excellent. There is Radcliffe College for young women. Above all there is the famous university, with its great library, its wonderful museum, its botanical garden, man
Sweden (Sweden) (search for this): chapter 23
chools. Miss Lelia A. Mirick, now Mrs. Frederick S. Cutter, was the first to hold this position, which was created in 1892. She was succeeded in 1895 by Miss Mary A. Lewis. The course of study is for three years. Of the 1159 pupils graduated in June, 1894, ten per cent. completed this course in less than three years, fifty-eight per cent. in three years, and thirty-two per cent. in more than three years. Regular instruction in botany has recently been introduced; also the Ling system of Swedish gymnastics. For eleven years Mrs. Quincy A. Shaw of Boston maintained three free kindergartens in Cambridge. A fourth was supported by a few Cambridge ladies. In 1889 the school committee assumed them as a part of the public school system and since that time have gradually added to their number until today there are eight kindergartens with 417 pupils and sixteen teachers. The city employs several special teachers. Mr. Frederick E. Chapman is director of music and Mr. James M. Ston
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