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Osbornville (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
, and they at this time own the factory and real estate which they occupy. On February 1, 1896, they reported an undivided surplus of three hundred thousand dollars. The officers of the company are as follows: William H. Ivers, president; George A. Gibson, secretary and treasurer; Handel Pond, general manager; John B. Dayfoot, superintendent. The George W. Seaverns Piano action Co. The business was established in 1851 by George W. Seaverns in a building on State Street known as Osborn's mill. Twice it was seriously interrupted by fire, once in 1855 and again in 1874. In the latter year Mr. Seaverns decided to seek larger quarters, and accordingly leased a portion of the Greely mill, their present location. The business increased so rapidly that they were obliged to lease the adjoining buildings, where they now have an extensive plant. In 1889 the business was incorporated under its present name, with a capital of fifty thousand dollars. The company consists of George
West Indies (search for this): chapter 45
en put in churches in nearly every State in the Union from Maine to California, besides quite a number for Canada, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, also for the West Indies, among which may be mentioned the celebrated organ in the Cathedral of San Felipe at Havana, Cuba; also those in the churches of El Monseratte, and Chapel of thnsively engaged in the manufacture of soap than any other place in New England. In the early days a large amount of this commodity was exported, chiefly to the West Indies and South America; but at the present time the manufacture is mainly confined to the home market. The business of soap-making in Cambridge was begun by Livermog beef. The manufacture of soap was added in order to work up the tallow which did not readily find a market, the soap being sold principally for export to the West Indies and South America. The history of the business from 1828 to 1845 is involved in obscurity, but the soap business was only a side issue, and was probably carrie
Birmingham (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 45
The total number of employees at the present time is about one thousand. The pumping machinery is shipped in quantity to every quarter of the globe, and ranges in size from pumps of a few hundred pounds weight to the highest grade of water-works pumping engines weighing over one million pounds each. Among the prominent American cities using the Blake water-works engines may be mentioned: Boston, New York, Washington, Camden, New Orleans, Cleveland, Mobile, Toronto, Shreveport, Helena, Birmingham, Racine, La Crosse, Mc-Keesport, etc. A partial list of places in Massachusetts includes: Cambridge, Newton, Brookline, Woburn, Natick, Hyde Park, Dedham, Needham, Wakefield, Malden, Arlington, Belmont, Walpole, Lexington, Gloucester, Marlboro, Weymouth, North Adams, Maynard, Mansfield, Randolph, Foxboro, Cohasset, Lenox, Chelsea, Brockton, Franklin, Provincetown, Canton, Stoughton, Braintree, and Wellesley. These engines are also in use in foreign water-works, as for instance at St. Pet
Hampshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 45
g increased to eighty by forty-four feet, three stories high. The plant was furnished with the latest improved machinery; the concern now employs from seventy-five to one hundred hands, and makes a specialty of chocolates, bonbons, and caramels. H. F. Sparrow, manufacturer of fine chocolates, bonbons, and caramels, began business in 1887, in a two-story building on Windsor Street; the growth of the business compelled larger quarters, and in 1891 the present factory, on the corner of Hampshire and Clark streets, was erected. The building measures one hundred and ten by forty-five feet, and has four stories and basement. By close attention to business a large trade over the United States has been secured; in the busy season one hundred and seventy-five hands are employed. The Bay State confectionery Co. are the successors of J. S. Bell & Co., who first engaged in manufacturing confectionery in a small building on Pearl Street, in May, 1890, moving into their present quart
Brockton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
ing the Blake water-works engines may be mentioned: Boston, New York, Washington, Camden, New Orleans, Cleveland, Mobile, Toronto, Shreveport, Helena, Birmingham, Racine, La Crosse, Mc-Keesport, etc. A partial list of places in Massachusetts includes: Cambridge, Newton, Brookline, Woburn, Natick, Hyde Park, Dedham, Needham, Wakefield, Malden, Arlington, Belmont, Walpole, Lexington, Gloucester, Marlboro, Weymouth, North Adams, Maynard, Mansfield, Randolph, Foxboro, Cohasset, Lenox, Chelsea, Brockton, Franklin, Provincetown, Canton, Stoughton, Braintree, and Wellesley. These engines are also in use in foreign water-works, as for instance at St. Petersburg, Honolulu, and Sydney. The new United States Navy is practically fitted out with Blake pumps, a partial list including the following vessels: Columbia, New York, Iowa, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Newark, Chicago, Boston, Atlanta, Massachusetts, Indiana, Maine, Puritan, Miantonomoh, Monadnock, Terror, Amphitrite, Katahdin, Detroit, Mont
Weston (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
lion two hundred thousand pounds of crude rubber and cotton and woolen cloths and other materials to the value of one million dollars are used annually. The company state that among the advantages found from being located in Cambridge are excellent freight facilities, nearness to the Boston market, and the ease with which they can find workmen when needed. A. H. Hews & Co. own the oldest existing pottery in the United States, located in North Cambridge. The business was founded at Weston, in 1765, by the grandfather of the present senior member of the firm of A. H. Hews & Co. On the fly-leaf of the journal of the founder of the business is written Abraham Hews's book, Weston. The first entry was made on the day of the battle of Lexington:— April 19, 1775. Lemuel Jones, to ware, Dr.028 Isaac Flagg, to ware, Dr.027 April 29, 1775. Isaac Jones, to ware, Dr.020 Nathan Darkhurs, to ware, Dr.020 June 19, 1793. David Brackett, to my horse to Framingham, 1
West Windsor (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
Mr. John P. Squire. Mr. Squire was born in Weathersfield, Vt., May 8, 1819, and was the son of Peter and Esther (Craigue) Squire. He spent his boyhood days on his father's farm, working during the vacations and attending the public schools in term time. This early experience on a New England farm was no hindrance to him in his later experience in business life. His first introduction to business was in his sixteenth year, when he entered the store of Mr. Gad Orvis, in the village of West Windsor, Vt. He remained with Mr. Orvis until the winter of 1837, and, although everything was conducted on a very small scale, he gained a good deal of insight into the methods of business management. In the winter of 1837, feeling the need of a better education, he attended the academy at Unity, N. H., of which the late Rev. A. A. Miner was then the principal; and during a part of the same year, to enable him to pay his expenses at the academy, he taught school at Cavendish, Vt. This finishe
Provincetown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
rks engines may be mentioned: Boston, New York, Washington, Camden, New Orleans, Cleveland, Mobile, Toronto, Shreveport, Helena, Birmingham, Racine, La Crosse, Mc-Keesport, etc. A partial list of places in Massachusetts includes: Cambridge, Newton, Brookline, Woburn, Natick, Hyde Park, Dedham, Needham, Wakefield, Malden, Arlington, Belmont, Walpole, Lexington, Gloucester, Marlboro, Weymouth, North Adams, Maynard, Mansfield, Randolph, Foxboro, Cohasset, Lenox, Chelsea, Brockton, Franklin, Provincetown, Canton, Stoughton, Braintree, and Wellesley. These engines are also in use in foreign water-works, as for instance at St. Petersburg, Honolulu, and Sydney. The new United States Navy is practically fitted out with Blake pumps, a partial list including the following vessels: Columbia, New York, Iowa, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Newark, Chicago, Boston, Atlanta, Massachusetts, Indiana, Maine, Puritan, Miantonomoh, Monadnock, Terror, Amphitrite, Katahdin, Detroit, Montgomery, Marblehead, Yo
Howe Spring (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
used annually. Employment is given to sixty men. David Wilcox & Co. This business was established in Cambridgeport in 1860. The company manufactures fine-grade stiff, silk, and soft hats for the retail trade throughout the country. The capacity of the factory is from sixty to seventy dozen per day. One hundred and fifty hands are employed, and the weekly pay-roll is from fifteen hundred to two thousand dollars. The partners are David Wilcox, Elbert P. Wilcox, and F. R. Going. Howe spring-bed Co. The manufacture of spring-beds was established in Cambridge in 1854 by Tyler and Otis Howe, father and son. The elder Howe died in 1880, and the business was continued by his son until his death in 1891. It was then purchased by Melvin M. Hannum, the present owner. Three floors of a brick building eighty feet by forty are occupied in the manufacture of spring-beds, cots, and berth bottoms. The product is sold over the United States, with some exports to England. Revere S
Springfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
ose.Maximum rate.Manufactures: per C gall.Steam and electric railroad: per C gall.Per hundred gals. for excess of amount over 5,000,000 gals. in any one year. Cambridge, Mass.$4.00$2.00$5.00$3.00$3.00$2.00$5.00$20.001½c.231 Fall River.5.002.505.005.004.003.006.0030.503 for all purposes. Fitchburg6.002.004.505.003.003.005.0028.503½c. for all purposes. Lowell.6.00ave. 3.00ave. 3.001.002.003.00No limitVaries from year to year Lynn.5.001.003.003.002.002.004.0024.002 for all purposes. Springfield.8.006.004.004.002.002.005.0031.003 for all purposes. Worcester.6.005.004.002.002.005.0024.002½c. for all purposes. Hartford, Conn.6.001.003.001.003.00No limit2 for all purposes. Providence, R. I.6.002.005.005.003.003.005.0040.002½c. for all purposes. Manchester, N. H.5.001.002.501.252.501.255.00No limit2 Portland, Me.10.005.006.002.503.005.0040.00- Erie, Pa.5.001.503.003.001.001.505.00No limit1 average rate. The valuation of Cambridge and its assets and liabilities are also of i
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