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to ensure its strict outward observance! From friends and foes of the Liberator protestations Lib. 6.135. were quickly heard against this heterodox doctrine. On August 11, Mr. Garrison writes from Brooklyn to Henry Benson: My review of Dr. Beechers speech seems to Ms. make some fluttering in certain quarters, especially my remarks upon the sanctity of the Sabbath; on the 18th Ms. he reports to the same that further censure had been visited upon him, as he had anticipated; and on the 21st, that there was still no end of it: The only thing that I regret is, the insertion of a Ms. communication by Knapp, (written by friend Oakes William Oakes, of Ipswich, Mass.), headed The New and old Puritans, because it is written in a manner Lib. 6.122. calculated to exasperate, and not to convince. I know how important it is that I should keep the columns of the Liberator clear of sectarianism, nor have I ever intended to assail any denominational feelings or peculiarities. T
January 1st (search for this): chapter 2
. of February 6. Mr. Garrison defended that Society against the pretence that it had changed for the worse so that an abolitionist could no longer remain in it; and the anti-slavery organization against the implication that it had abandoned the aims and methods which up to the time of the Utica mob had been reprobated by Mr. Smith. The letter of withdrawal was pronounced not ingenuous, and full of error, the proof and product of confusion of mind. So distinguished a convert, bringing a New Year's Lib. 6.22. gift of a thousand dollars, might, it seemed to many of the abolitionists, have been spared this inhospitable welcome to their ranks. Lewis Tappan wrote from New York to Mr. Garrison, February 25, 1836: Your Ms. remarks on Mr. G. Smith have given uneasiness, I learn, to some abolitionists, but they were well-timed. We ought to deal kindly with such a man as Mr. Smith, but until he confesses his faults he ought to be rebuked publicly. The sequel showed that a magnanimous mi
January 23rd (search for this): chapter 2
verything else give way (communications, editorials, and all) to the debates in Congress upon the petitions for the abolition of slavery in the D. of C. The sooner we District of Columbia. publish the debates, the greater will be the interest in their perusal. Let him select the best reports he can find. It is important, too, that we should publish all official documents, in opposition to our cause, instanter, that we may not be anticipated by other papers. In the next Liberator (i. e., Jan. 23), if possible, insert the accompanying extract from Gov. Marcy's Lib. 6.17, 13. message, and also the correspondence between him and Gov. Gayle, of Alabama, respecting Williams—especially the latter. Give as good an account of the annual meeting to the readers Mass. A. S. Society. as the time will permit. Probably E. M. P. Wells would prefer not to be one of the officers of our Society. Let the Vice-Presidents be as influential as possible, without relying too much upon names. We
ay of increasing this impediment to Christian intercourse, Mr. Thompson also squared his cis-Atlantic Lib. 6.133, 137, 142. account with Drs. Cox and Hoby, and held a prolonged debate with the American colonizationist, Dr. Robert J. Lib. 6.135, 157, 190; ante, 1.449. Breckinridge. During this momentous year Mr. Garrison was less conspicuous than in any since the founding of the Liberator. The first nine months were spent in Brooklyn, Conn.; for, on the eve of his wife's confinement (in February), it would have been impracticable to begin housekeeping afresh in Boston, and after that event many reasons combined to prolong his absence from the hot and crowded city, with its manifold interruptions of editorial work. The severe regimen, the irregular habit, and the excitement of the period before and immediately after his marriage had begun to tell upon his system. He suffered much from a scrofulous affection manifesting itself in various parts of the body, and from a wound in the l
February 6th (search for this): chapter 2
o his son Henry, at Providence, February 13, 1836: Your brother Ms. Garrison had a letter yesterday with a check from Gerrit Smith (for thirty dollars), who may read in the Liberator. Lib. 6.26. of this day some severe animadversions on his palpable inconsistency. But Garrison intends to write to him a friendly letter, which I much approve. These animadversions had been called out by Mr. Smith's formal leavetak-ing of the Colonization Society, as printed in the Liberator Lib. 6.23. of February 6. Mr. Garrison defended that Society against the pretence that it had changed for the worse so that an abolitionist could no longer remain in it; and the anti-slavery organization against the implication that it had abandoned the aims and methods which up to the time of the Utica mob had been reprobated by Mr. Smith. The letter of withdrawal was pronounced not ingenuous, and full of error, the proof and product of confusion of mind. So distinguished a convert, bringing a New Year's Lib
February 20th (search for this): chapter 2
very able Memorial, to be presented to the Legislature. The Sonnets in question were those addressed to an infant A son named for George Thompson, who quickly returned the compliment in April, when Mrs. Thompson presented him with a son. The editor of the Norwich (Conn.) Aurora chronicled the former naming, and advised Mr. Garrison to call his next boy Benedict Arnold (Ms. April 10, 1836). born on Saturday last, February 13th, 1836, by the Editor, and printed in the Liberator of February 20. They here follow: I. Heaven's long-desired gift! my first-born child! Lib. 6.31; Writings of W. L. G., p. 261. Pledge of the purest love! my darling son! Now do I feel a father's bliss begun,— A father's hopes and fears,—babe undefiled! Shouldst thou be spared, I could be reconciled Better to martyrdom,—so may be won Freedom for all, and servile chains undone. For if, amid this conflict, fierce and wild, With the stout foes of God and man, I fall, Then shalt thou early fill my<
March 2nd (search for this): chapter 2
ccount of the Interviews, etc.; Lib. 6.43, 46, 49; May's Recollections, pp. 185-202. which Senator George Lunt (from Essex County) was chairman. Before this committee, on the 4th of March, 1836, the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society was, on its own request, granted a hearing, less in self-exculpation than in order to defeat the Southern and pro-Southern design on a common right. Mr. Garrison, summoned by the Board of Managers for the occasion, left his wife and infant on Wednesday, the 2d of March, and, in company with S. J. May, proceeded on that day as far as Providence. W. L. Garrison to his Wife, at Brooklyn. Boston, March 5, 1836. Ms. . . . At 8 o'clock, next morning, we left for Boston in the stage-coach, (on runners), the rail-cars being obstructed by the ice. Arrived safely at 3 o'clock P. M. Mr. May was delighted to find his wife and his little one in prosperous health. A very kind reception was given to me by all the friends at Miss Parker's. Called immediate
March 4th (search for this): chapter 2
ee. I succeeded him pretty warmly, but without interruption. Mr. Lunt, not content with his many outrageous interruptions on this occasion, had the dulness to invent another, of which he represented Mr. Garrison to have been the victim (see p. 108 of his preposterous Origin of the late war, Boston, 1866, and the citation from it in a letter to the Boston Daily Advertiser of Feb. 17, 1883). There is no mention of it in the official pamphlet Account of the Interviews which took place on the 4th and 8th of March, etc., published by the Mass. A. S. Society. Mr. Garrison's opening ran as follows: Mr. Chairman, inasmuch as your honorable committee have said to the abolitionists, Paul, thou art permitted to speak for thyself, I, for one am disposed to reply with all sincerity, I thank thee, King Agrippa. Yet I am not willing to consider it merely as a favor that we are permitted to appear before you (Lib. 6: 50). Prof. Follen began next, with great boldness and eloquence, but had not
March 5th (search for this): chapter 2
e heard as a matter of right, which we did to-day, and are to be heard next week. The effect has been good for our cause. W. L. Garrison to his wife, at Brooklyn. Boston, March 7, 1836. Ms. Since my return to the city, my numerous anti-slavery friends have vied with each other in proffering their kindnesses to me. It strengthens me exceedingly to know that their confidence and esteem have suffered no abatement, nay, that absence has but greatly augmented them. Saturday night March 5. I slept with Knapp and Henry in the office, and had as Henry Benson. comfortable a time as such a berth could possibly give, be it more or less. Sabbath forenoon, Mr. May, Henry and myself went March 6. to hear Dr. Channing preach, This may have been the occasion of which Mrs. Chapman speaks (Ms. November, 1882): It was about this time [the mob time] that Mr. Garrison expressed to us a wish to hear Dr. Channing preach, and we invited him to take a seat in the pew kindly placed at o
March 6th (search for this): chapter 2
eatly augmented them. Saturday night March 5. I slept with Knapp and Henry in the office, and had as Henry Benson. comfortable a time as such a berth could possibly give, be it more or less. Sabbath forenoon, Mr. May, Henry and myself went March 6. to hear Dr. Channing preach, This may have been the occasion of which Mrs. Chapman speaks (Ms. November, 1882): It was about this time [the mob time] that Mr. Garrison expressed to us a wish to hear Dr. Channing preach, and we invited him td the pressure of business do not allow people to think much on the subject! ( Memoir, 3.170). No wonder this letter was suppressed in the Centenary edition of the Memoir. Last evening, there was a circle gathered by special invitation at Sunday, March 6. Mr. Loring's house, among the number being Miss Martineau, Miss Jeffery, Mr. and Mrs. Chapman, Mr. May, Messrs. Rantoul and Hillard, of the Legislature, Robert Rantoul, then a Democrat, and at the beginning of his honorable political ca
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