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Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ston Atlas a few days after most able and triumphant. He compared the slaves to a menagerie of wild beasts, and the rioters at Alton to the orderly mob which threw the tea overboard in 1773, --talked of the conflict of laws between Missouri and Illinois,--declared that Lovejoy was presumptuous and imprudent, and died as the fool dieth ; in direct and most insulting reference to Dr. Channing, he asserted that a clergyman with a gun in his hand, or one mingling in the debates of a popular assemblthe State you leave is blotted out of existence, so far as you are concerned. The Czar might as well claim to control the deliberations of Faneuil Hall, as the laws of Missouri demand reverence, or the shadow of obedience, from an inhabitant of Illinois. I must find some fault with the statement which has been made of the events at Alton. It has been asked why Lovejoy and his friends did not appeal to the executive,--trust their defence to the police of the city. It has been hinted that,
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
rguments of John Adams to prove the taxes laid by the British Parliament unconstitutional,--beyond its power. It was not till this was made out that the men of New England rushed to arms. The arguments of the Council Chamber and the House of Representatives preceded and sanctioned the contest. To draw the conduct of our ancestorunsuccessful. After a short exile, the race he hated sat again upon the throne. Imagine yourself present when the first news of Bunker Hill battle reached a New England town. The tale would have run thus: The patriots are routed,--the redcoats victorious,--Warren lies dead upon the field. With what scorn would that Tory have f manhood. The people there, children of our older States, seem to have forgotten the blood-tried principles of their fathers the moment they lost sight of our New England hills. Something was to be done to show them the priceless value of the freedom of the press, to bring back and set right their wandering and confused ideas.
Alton (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
, Rev. E. P. Lovejoy was shot by a mob at Alton, Illinois, while attempting to defend his printing-a menagerie of wild beasts, and the rioters at Alton to the orderly mob which threw the tea overboahe events of the Revolution and the tragedy at Alton. We have heard it asserted here, in Faneuil Htax the Colonies, and we have heard the mob at Alton, the drunken murderers of Lovejoy, compared toy down principles which place the murderers of Alton side by side with Otis and Hancock, with Quinc Mississippi River rolls between St. Louis and Alton; and the conflict of laws somehow or other givstatement which has been made of the events at Alton. It has been asked why Lovejoy and his frienction of the Mayor. There being no militia in Alton, about seventy men were enrolled with the apprersons seem to imagine that anarchy existed at Alton from the commencement of these disputes. Not of my heart I thank that brave little band at Alton for resisting. We must remember that Lov3joy[1 more...]
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
led by the Boston Atlas a few days after most able and triumphant. He compared the slaves to a menagerie of wild beasts, and the rioters at Alton to the orderly mob which threw the tea overboard in 1773, --talked of the conflict of laws between Missouri and Illinois,--declared that Lovejoy was presumptuous and imprudent, and died as the fool dieth ; in direct and most insulting reference to Dr. Channing, he asserted that a clergyman with a gun in his hand, or one mingling in the debates of a potate from another be an imaginary one or ocean-wide, the moment you cross it the State you leave is blotted out of existence, so far as you are concerned. The Czar might as well claim to control the deliberations of Faneuil Hall, as the laws of Missouri demand reverence, or the shadow of obedience, from an inhabitant of Illinois. I must find some fault with the statement which has been made of the events at Alton. It has been asked why Lovejoy and his friends did not appeal to the executiv
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
nned into sobriety. They saw that of which we cannot judge, the necessity of resistance. Insulted law called for it. Public opinion, fast hastening on the downward course, must be arrested. Does not the event show they judged rightly? Absorbed in a thousand trifles, how has the nation all at once come to a stand? Men begin, as in 1776 and 1640, to discuss principles, to weigh characters, to find out where they are. Haply we may awake before we are borne over the precipice. I am glad, Sir, to see this crowded house. It is good for us to be here. When Liberty is in danger, Faneuil Hall has the right, it is her duty, to strike the key-note for these United States. I am glad, for one reason, that remarks such as those to which I have alluded have been uttered here. The passage of these resolutions, in spite of this opposition, led by the Attorney-General of the Commonwealth, will show more clearly, more decisively, the deep indignation with which Boston regards this outage.
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
r the freest discussion of these resolutions, and the events which gave rise to them. [Cries of Question, Hear him, Go on, No gagging, etc.] I hope I shall be permitted to express my surprise at the sentiments of the last speaker,--surprise not only at such sentiments from such a man, but at the applause they have received within these walls. A comparison has been drawn between the events of the Revolution and the tragedy at Alton. We have heard it asserted here, in Faneuil Hall, that Great Britain had a right to tax the Colonies, and we have heard the mob at Alton, the drunken murderers of Lovejoy, compared to those patriot fathers who threw the tea overboard! [Great applause.] Fellow-citizens, is this Faneuil Hall doctrine? [ No, no. ] The mob at Alton were met to wrest from a citizen his just rights,--met to resist the laws. We have been told that our fathers did the same; and the glorious mantle of Revolutionary precedent has been thrown over the mobs of our day. To make out
James Otis (search for this): chapter 3
were the people rising to sustain the laws and constitution of the Province. The rioters of our day go for their own wills, right or wrong. Sir, when I heard the gentleman lay down principles which place the murderers of Alton side by side with Otis and Hancock, with Quincy and Adams, I thought those pictured lips [pointing to the portraits in she Hall] would have broken into voice to rebuke the recreant American,--the slanderer of the dead. [Great applause and counter applause.] The gentlemeneath that for which he died. [Here there was a strong and general expression of disapprobation.] One word, gentlemen. As much as thought is better than money, so much is the cause in which Lovejoy died nobler than a mere question of taxes. James Otis thundered in this Hall when the King did but touch his pocket. Imagine, if you can, his indignant eloquence, had England offered to put a gag upon his lips. [Great applause.] The question that stirred the Revolution touched our civil intere
for their own wills, right or wrong. Sir, when I heard the gentleman lay down principles which place the murderers of Alton side by side with Otis and Hancock, with Quincy and Adams, I thought those pictured lips [pointing to the portraits in she Hall] would have broken into voice to rebuke the recreant American,--the slanderer of the dead. [Great applause and counter applause.] The gentleman said that he should sink into insignificance if he dared to gainsay the principles of these resolutionied. [Here there was a strong and general expression of disapprobation.] One word, gentlemen. As much as thought is better than money, so much is the cause in which Lovejoy died nobler than a mere question of taxes. James Otis thundered in this Hall when the King did but touch his pocket. Imagine, if you can, his indignant eloquence, had England offered to put a gag upon his lips. [Great applause.] The question that stirred the Revolution touched our civil interests. This concerns us not
B. F. Hallett (search for this): chapter 3
of Faneuil Hall for a public meeting. The request was refused. Dr. Channing then addressed a very impressive letter to his fellow-citizens, which resulted in a meeting of influential gentleman at the Old Court Room. Resolutions, drawn by Hon. B. F. Hallett, were unanimously adopted, and measures taken to secure a much larger number of names to the petition. This call the Mayor and Aldermen obeyed. The meeting was held on the 8th of December, and organized, with the Hon. Jonathan Phillips for Chairman. Dr. Channing made a brief and eloquent address. Resolutions, drawn by him, were then read and offered by Mr. Hallett, and seconded in an able speech by George S. Hillard; Esq. The Hon. James T. Austin, Attorney-General of the Commonwealth, allowed in a speech of the utmost bitterness, styled by the Boston Atlas a few days after most able and triumphant. He compared the slaves to a menagerie of wild beasts, and the rioters at Alton to the orderly mob which threw the tea ove
W. Sturgis (search for this): chapter 3
od of patriots, the earth should have yawned and swallowed him up. [Applause and hisses, with cries of Take that back. The uproar been so great that for a long time no one could be heard. At length G. Bond, Esq., and Hon. W. Sturgis came to Mr. Phillips's side at th front of the platform. They were met with cries of Phillips or nobody, Make him take back recreant, He sha'n't go on till he takes it back. When it was understood they meant to sustain, not to interrupt, Mr. Phillips, Mr. Sturgis was listened to, and said: I did not come here to take any part in this discussion, nor do I intend to; but I do entreat you, fellow-citizens, by everything you hold sacred.-I conjure you by every association connected with this Hall, consecrated by our fathers to freedom of discussion,--that you listen to every man who address you in a decorous manner. Mr. Phillips resumed.] Fellow-citizens, I cannot take back my words. Surely the Attorney-General, so long and well known here, needs
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