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Carpathians (search for this): chapter 7
very in peace till you got a new race to people these shores. The blood which has cleared the forest, tortured the earth of its secrets, made the ocean its vassal, and subjected every other race it has met, will never volunteer its own industry to forge gags for its own lips. You, therefore, who look forward to slavery and peace, make ready to sweep clean the continent, and see that Webster, Foot, and Dickinson be the Shem, Ham, and Japlet of the Ark you shall prepare. [Cheers.] The Carpathian Mountains may serve to shelter tyrants; the slope of Germany may bear up a race more familiar with the Greek text than the Greek phalanx; the wave of Russian rule may sweep so far westward, for aught I know, as to fill with miniature tyrants again the robber castles of the Rhine,--but this I do know: God has piled our Rocky Mountains as ramparts for freedom; He has scooped the valley of the Mississippi as the cradle of free States, and poured Niagara as the anthem of free men. [Loud cheers.]
Fort Niagara (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ery in peace till you got a new race to people these shores. The blood which has cleared the forest, tortured the earth of its secrets, made the ocean its vassal, and subjected every other race it has met, will never volunteer its own industry to forge gags for its own lips. You, therefore, who look forward to slavery and peace, make ready to sweep clean the continent, and see that Webster, Foot, and Dickinson be the Shem, Ham, and Japlet of the Ark you shall prepare. [Cheers.] The Carpathian Mountains may serve to shelter tyrants; the slope of Germany may bear up a race more familiar with the Greek text than the Greek phalanx; the wave of Russian rule may sweep so far westward, for aught I know, as to fill with miniature tyrants again the robber castles of the Rhine,--but this I do know: God has piled our Rocky Mountains as ramparts for freedom; He has scooped the valley of the Mississippi as the cradle of free States, and poured Niagara as the anthem of free men. [Loud cheers.]
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Welcome to George Thompson (1840). A reception to George Thompson, in Faneuil Hall, November 15, 1850, was broken up by an angry mob. The meeting was therefore adjourned to Worcester, and supplemented by other meetings in several cities. At the reception in Lynn, November 26, 1850, Mr. Phillips delivered the following speech:-- This is certainly, fellow-citizens, a glad sight for my eloquent friend to look upon; these enthusiastic crowds, pressing to extend to him a welcome, and do thup full as much of the last spasms of defeated Whiggery,--Webster Whiggery, I mean,--as of hatred for George Thompson. [Cheers.] And it is in connection, partly, with this point, that I hail these tokens of welcome extended to him here, and at Worcester, as of especial value. It is of great importance, just now, that the South and the nation should understand Massachusetts. Mr. Webster has been trying to persuade everybody that he is the State. Some leading presses have labored to show that
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
the position he occupied, since he was pouring the waters of life into the very fountainhead of our literature. Neither have his labors in behalf of other reforms been so much lost to the slave. The cause of tyrants is one the world over [cheers], and the cause of resistance to tyranny is one also. [Cheers.] Whoever, anywhere, loves truth and hates error, frowns on injustice and holds out his hand to the oppressed, that man helps the slave. An Hungarian triumph lightens the chains of Carolina; and an infamous vote in the United States Senate adds darkness to the dungeon where German patriots lie entombed. [Cheers.] All oppressions under the sun are linked together, and each feels the Devil's pulse keep time in it to the life-blood of every other. Of this brotherhood, it matters not what member you assail, since- Whichever link you strike, Tenth or ten thousandth, breaks the chain alike. [Cheers.] The cause of reform, too, is one,--distinct like the billows, but one lik
whether his voice cheered the starving Hindoo crushed beneath British selfishness, or Hungary battling against treason and the Czar; whether he pleaded at home for bread and the ballot, or held up with his sympathy the ever-hopeful enthusiasm of Ireland,--every true word spoken for suffering man, is so much done for the negro bending beneath the weight of American bondage. [Cheers.] It is said that the earthquake of Lisbon tossed the sea in billows on the coast of Cuba; so no indignant heart ie of the house. Mistaken man! how wild in him, an invalid, to take so Northerly a view of this great question! [Cheers.] But for this, like the pliant Irishman, he might have moved in the best society! Could he but have chanced to be born in Ireland, and have early contracted the habit of kissing the Blarney stone of every nation, instead of shivering here beneath that North Star,--which South Carolina, it is said, intends to forbid her pilots to steer by, it is so incendiary a twinkler! [
Hungary (Hungary) (search for this): chapter 7
Devil's pulse keep time in it to the life-blood of every other. Of this brotherhood, it matters not what member you assail, since- Whichever link you strike, Tenth or ten thousandth, breaks the chain alike. [Cheers.] The cause of reform, too, is one,--distinct like the billows, but one like the sea. It matters not, therefore, in what part of the Lord's harvest-field our friend has been toiling: whether his voice cheered the starving Hindoo crushed beneath British selfishness, or Hungary battling against treason and the Czar; whether he pleaded at home for bread and the ballot, or held up with his sympathy the ever-hopeful enthusiasm of Ireland,--every true word spoken for suffering man, is so much done for the negro bending beneath the weight of American bondage. [Cheers.] It is said that the earthquake of Lisbon tossed the sea in billows on the coast of Cuba; so no indignant heart is beating anywhere whose pulses are not felt on the walls of our American Bastile. [Cheer
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
the South and the nation should understand Massachusetts. Mr. Webster has been trying to persuade elabored to show that Webster, Whigdom, and Massachusetts were identical. While things remained as w, at least, the question is settled where Massachusetts stands; so unequivocally, that even the Dan reply to some taunt of Hayne's, There is Massachusetts! Behold her, and judge for yourselves! T doubts our position, let us cry, There is Massachusetts! Behold her, and judge for yourselves! Teers.] Mr. Curtis defended the right of Massachusetts to surrender the fugitive slave, on the grby yielding to its noblest instincts; that Massachusetts cannot now afford to be humane, to open hesome shadow of claim to plausibility. But Massachusetts has pledged her whole strength to the slave free arms to God, and thank him, not for Massachusetts' mercy, but for Massachusetts' justice andMassachusetts' justice and consistency. But, granting the whole of Mr. Curtis's argument, he did not touch, or even glance[1 more...]
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 7
ation — very palpably evaded any expression of opinion on the propriety or necessity of the late Fugitive Slave Bill, another homage of vice to virtue. He also admitted the slave clause of the Constitution to be immoral. His only argument to justify our fathers in admitting it was, they were afraid to do otherwise; feared poverty, England, anarchy, and all sorts of ills. The Sultan might well have pleaded, in the face of Mr. Webster's recent eloquence, that fear of dethronement, anarchy, Russia, and a thousand ills, justified him in surrendering Kossuth. Would the world, would humanity, would even Mr. Webster, have said Amen to such a plea from his mouth? There may be times when States should say with the great Roman, It is necessary to go; it is not necessary to live! Perhaps Mr. Curtis may yet find this to be one of those occasions. One thing we know, the great senator told the Sultan that if Kossuth were given up, he could not tell how or when, but verily, Turkey would someh
Turquie (Turkey) (search for this): chapter 7
t, anarchy, Russia, and a thousand ills, justified him in surrendering Kossuth. Would the world, would humanity, would even Mr. Webster, have said Amen to such a plea from his mouth? There may be times when States should say with the great Roman, It is necessary to go; it is not necessary to live! Perhaps Mr. Curtis may yet find this to be one of those occasions. One thing we know, the great senator told the Sultan that if Kossuth were given up, he could not tell how or when, but verily, Turkey would somehow have to look out for the consequences. I thank thee, Jew, for teaching me that word. Once on a time Emperor Georgia sent after our William and Ellen Kossuth; the Webster Whigs argued for their surrender; and Heaven has graciously permitted us to live and see both how and when they had to look out for the consequences. [Laughter and cheers.] Mr. Curtis defended the right of Massachusetts to surrender the fugitive slave, on the ground that every sovereign State had authorit
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
r the benefit of his health. In Italy invalids are always recommended to secure the southerly side of the house. Mistaken man! how wild in him, an invalid, to take so Northerly a view of this great question! [Cheers.] But for this, like the pliant Irishman, he might have moved in the best society! Could he but have chanced to be born in Ireland, and have early contracted the habit of kissing the Blarney stone of every nation, instead of shivering here beneath that North Star,--which South Carolina, it is said, intends to forbid her pilots to steer by, it is so incendiary a twinkler! [laughter and cheers]instead of this, he could repose his wearied virtue -- Where the gentle south wind lingers, 'Mid Carolina's pines; Or falls the careless sunbeam Down Georgia's golden mines. I come to-night from that little family party of the Curtises, the slave-catchers' meeting in Faneuil Hall, and am exceedingly glad to be able to inform you that our ever-active [!] Mayor has been able,
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