hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Wayland (Massachusetts, United States) 214 4 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child 155 1 Browse Search
John Brown 89 3 Browse Search
Charles Sumner 76 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 68 0 Browse Search
Kansas (Kansas, United States) 48 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 46 0 Browse Search
William Lloyd Garrison 41 1 Browse Search
Henry A. Wise 41 1 Browse Search
George Thompson 40 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). Search the whole document.

Found 8 total hits in 5 results.

Wayland (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 138
To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. Wayland, 1869. The music-box arrived safely, and I thank you from my inmost heart for thinking of your old friend, and wishing to give her pleasure. The old music-box is very dear to me. Its powers are limited, but what it does say it says very sweetly; and the memories it sings to me are the dearest of all .... We had quite a glorification here over Grant's election. We had a really handsome procession of five hundred men bearing flags and gay-colored lanterns, and attended by a band of music from Boston. I had no idea they would come up so far as our house; but as we had subscribed, as they thought, liberally, they concluded to pay us that compliment. When we heard the sounds coming nearer and nearer, and saw the first torches pass our nearest neighbor's, I tore open the curtains, and scrambled to place fourteen lights in the front windows; being all I could get up on such short notice. Then I went to the front door and waved a great white cloth, an
Richard Grant (search for this): chapter 138
end, and wishing to give her pleasure. The old music-box is very dear to me. Its powers are limited, but what it does say it says very sweetly; and the memories it sings to me are the dearest of all .... We had quite a glorification here over Grant's election. We had a really handsome procession of five hundred men bearing flags and gay-colored lanterns, and attended by a band of music from Boston. I had no idea they would come up so far as our house; but as we had subscribed, as they tho door, David was exercising his lungs at another. A crowd of foreigners were following the procession in a discomfited state of mind, and seeing us so jubilant they called out, Three cheers for the nigger President! a curious title to bestow on Grant, who has never manifested the slightest interest in the colored people. But I don't want him to be a nigger President. I simply want him to see that equal justice is administered to all classes of people, and I have great hopes he will do that.
To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. Wayland, 1869. The music-box arrived safely, and I thank you from my inmost heart for thinking of your old friend, and wishing to give her pleasure. The old music-box is very dear to me. Its powers are limited, but what it does say it says very sweetly; and the memories it sings to me are the dearest of all .... We had quite a glorification here over Grant's election. We had a really handsome procession of five hundred men bearing flags and gay-colored lanterns, and attended by a band of music from Boston. I had no idea they would come up so far as our house; but as we had subscribed, as they thought, liberally, they concluded to pay us that compliment. When we heard the sounds coming nearer and nearer, and saw the first torches pass our nearest neighbor's, I tore open the curtains, and scrambled to place fourteen lights in the front windows; being all I could get up on such short notice. Then I went to the front door and waved a great white cloth, an
all I could get up on such short notice. Then I went to the front door and waved a great white cloth, and joined in the hurrahs of the procession like a strong-minded woman as I am. The fact is, I forget half the time whether I belong to the stronger or weaker sex. While I was demonstrating at one door, David was exercising his lungs at another. A crowd of foreigners were following the procession in a discomfited state of mind, and seeing us so jubilant they called out, Three cheers for the nigger President! a curious title to bestow on Grant, who has never manifested the slightest interest in the colored people. But I don't want him to be a nigger President. I simply want him to see that equal justice is administered to all classes of people, and I have great hopes he will do that. So unpretending a man must be substantially good and honest, I think. However, I did not shout from such enthusiasm for him so much as I did from a feeling of relief that we were rid of Seymour.
To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. Wayland, 1869. The music-box arrived safely, and I thank you from my inmost heart for thinking of your old friend, and wishing to give her pleasure. The old music-box is very dear to me. Its powers are limited, but what it does say it says very sweetly; and the memories it sings to me are the dearest of all .... We had quite a glorification here over Grant's election. We had a really handsome procession of five hundred men bearing flags and gay-colored lanterns, and attended by a band of music from Boston. I had no idea they would come up so far as our house; but as we had subscribed, as they thought, liberally, they concluded to pay us that compliment. When we heard the sounds coming nearer and nearer, and saw the first torches pass our nearest neighbor's, I tore open the curtains, and scrambled to place fourteen lights in the front windows; being all I could get up on such short notice. Then I went to the front door and waved a great white cloth, and