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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). Search the whole document.

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Wayland (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 149
To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. Wayland, 1872. I wanted to write a hurrah as soon as it was certain the ship of state had safely passed that coalition snag, Referring to President Grant's reelection. but was prevented from time to time. Then came that awful fire in Boston, and put one out of the mood of hurrahing. But that conflagration, terrible as it was, was not so disastrous as would have been the restoration of Democrats and rebels to power. And not only have we cause for congratulation that a present danger is escaped, but we have reason to be devoutly thankful for this new proof that the people are capable of self-government. About the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, you and I, as usual, agree. I have taken a lively interest in it, and have been a member of the Boston society from the beginning. I have not made up my mind about the Darwinian theory, but I have long felt that man does not sufficiently recognize his kindred with animals. If they were tende
To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. Wayland, 1872. I wanted to write a hurrah as soon as it was certain the ship of state had safely passed that coalition snag, Referring to President Grant's reelection. but was prevented from time to time. Then came that awful fire in Boston, and put one out of the mood of hurrahing. But that conflagration, terrible as it was, was not so disastrous as would have been the restoration of Democrats and rebels to power. And not only have we cause for congratulation that a present danger is escaped, but we have reason to be devoutly thankful for this new proof that the people are capable of self-government. About the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, you and I, as usual, agree. I have taken a lively interest in it, and have been a member of the Boston society from the beginning. I have not made up my mind about the Darwinian theory, but I have long felt that man does not sufficiently recognize his kindred with animals. If they were tende
Richard Grant (search for this): chapter 149
To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. Wayland, 1872. I wanted to write a hurrah as soon as it was certain the ship of state had safely passed that coalition snag, Referring to President Grant's reelection. but was prevented from time to time. Then came that awful fire in Boston, and put one out of the mood of hurrahing. But that conflagration, terrible as it was, was not so disastrous as would have been the restoration of Democrats and rebels to power. And not only have we cause for congratulation that a present danger is escaped, but we have reason to be devoutly thankful for this new proof that the people are capable of self-government. About the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, you and I, as usual, agree. I have taken a lively interest in it, and have been a member of the Boston society from the beginning. I have not made up my mind about the Darwinian theory, but I have long felt that man does not sufficiently recognize his kindred with animals. If they were tende
To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. Wayland, 1872. I wanted to write a hurrah as soon as it was certain the ship of state had safely passed that coalition snag, Referring to President Grant's reelection. but was prevented from time to time. Then came that awful fire in Boston, and put one out of the mood of hurrahing. But that conflagration, terrible as it was, was not so disastrous as would have been the restoration of Democrats and rebels to power. And not only have we cause for congratulation that a present danger is escaped, but we have reason to be devoutly thankful for this new proof that the people are capable of self-government. About the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, you and I, as usual, agree. I have taken a lively interest in it, and have been a member of the Boston society from the beginning. I have not made up my mind about the Darwinian theory, but I have long felt that man does not sufficiently recognize his kindred with animals. If they were tender