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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). Search the whole document.

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Northampton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
To Francis G. Shaw. Northampton, 1840. I too should like to see the poetry of motion in Fanny Elssler. But the only thing (except seeing dear friends) that has attracted me to Boston, was the exhibition of statuary. In particular I have an earnest desire to see the Infant guided to heaven by angels. I am ashamed to say how deeply I am charmed with sculpture; ashamed, because it seems like affectation in one who has had such very limited opportunity to become acquainted with the arts. I have a little plaster figure of a caryatid, which acts upon my spirit like a magician's spell. Sarah (she reproves me when I call her Mrs. S.) did not seem to think much of it; but to me it has an expression of the highest kind. Repose after conflict — not the repose of innocence, but the repose of wisdom. Many a time this hard summer I have laid down dish-cloth or broom and gone to refresh my spirit by gazing on it a few minutes. It speaks to me. It says glorious things. In summer I plac
Francis G. Shaw (search for this): chapter 32
To Francis G. Shaw. Northampton, 1840. I too should like to see the poetry of motion in Fanny Elssler. But the only thing (except seeing dear friends) that has attracted me to Boston, was the exhibition of statuary. In particular I have an earnest desire to see the Infant guided to heaven by angels. I am ashamed to say how deeply I am charmed with sculpture; ashamed, because it seems like affectation in one who has had such very limited opportunity to become acquainted with the arts. I have a little plaster figure of a caryatid, which acts upon my spirit like a magician's spell. Sarah (she reproves me when I call her Mrs. S.) did not seem to think much of it; but to me it has an expression of the highest kind. Repose after conflict — not the repose of innocence, but the repose of wisdom. Many a time this hard summer I have laid down dish-cloth or broom and gone to refresh my spirit by gazing on it a few minutes. It speaks to me. It says glorious things. In summer I plac
Fanny Elssler (search for this): chapter 32
To Francis G. Shaw. Northampton, 1840. I too should like to see the poetry of motion in Fanny Elssler. But the only thing (except seeing dear friends) that has attracted me to Boston, was the exhibition of statuary. In particular I have an earnest desire to see the Infant guided to heaven by angels. I am ashamed to say how deeply I am charmed with sculpture; ashamed, because it seems like affectation in one who has had such very limited opportunity to become acquainted with the arts. I have a little plaster figure of a caryatid, which acts upon my spirit like a magician's spell. Sarah (she reproves me when I call her Mrs. S.) did not seem to think much of it; but to me it has an expression of the highest kind. Repose after conflict — not the repose of innocence, but the repose of wisdom. Many a time this hard summer I have laid down dish-cloth or broom and gone to refresh my spirit by gazing on it a few minutes. It speaks to me. It says glorious things. In summer I plac
To Francis G. Shaw. Northampton, 1840. I too should like to see the poetry of motion in Fanny Elssler. But the only thing (except seeing dear friends) that has attracted me to Boston, was the exhibition of statuary. In particular I have an earnest desire to see the Infant guided to heaven by angels. I am ashamed to say how deeply I am charmed with sculpture; ashamed, because it seems like affectation in one who has had such very limited opportunity to become acquainted with the arts. I have a little plaster figure of a caryatid, which acts upon my spirit like a magician's spell. Sarah (she reproves me when I call her Mrs. S.) did not seem to think much of it; but to me it has an expression of the highest kind. Repose after conflict — not the repose of innocence, but the repose of wisdom. Many a time this hard summer I have laid down dish-cloth or broom and gone to refresh my spirit by gazing on it a few minutes. It speaks to me. It says glorious things. In summer I place