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Wayland (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 59
To Francis G. Shaw. Wayland, January 22, 1854. Did you ever see, among a series of frescoes by Correggio, somewhere in Italy, Diana with a crescent on her brow, guiding her chariot through the clouds? The engraving of it by Toschi is, to me, the most graceful, beautiful, altogether perfect thing I ever did see. It is a glorious woman, and yet, in expression, the real full moon, guiding her bright chariot through the heavens. If I lived where it was I should make a little golden altar, and burn incense before it. You see there is no washing my Greek heathenism out of me. What is the reason that a region so totally unlike my homely environment in the outward world has always seemed to me so like a remembered home? . . . Things are going on at a terrible rate on the slavery question. They are trying in Congress to vote payment to the piratical claimants of the Amistad, and to abolish the obligation of Southerners in the Missouri compromise. Think of that! Gerrit Smith is in
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 59
ey may be heaped on till some of the old spirit is roused. There was a large meeting at Faneuil Hall when the slave was arrested. Mr. Russell presided, and the speeches and resolutions were uncommonly spirited and eloquent. But they talked boldly of a rescue the next morning, and so did more harm than good by forewarning the Southerners, and giving them time to summon a great array of United States troops. If they had only struck when the iron was hot, and used very slight precautions, I think the poor slave might have been rescued without shedding blood. But it was not done, and order reigns in Warsaw, as the Russian officials declared after the knout had driven all the Polish heroes into Siberia. My soul is just now in a stormy state, and it curses law and order, seeing them all arrayed on the wrong side. This fierce mood will soon give place to a milder one. But oh, my friend, these continually baffled efforts for human freedom, they are agonizing to the sympathizing soul.
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 59
vote payment to the piratical claimants of the Amistad, and to abolish the obligation of Southerners in the Missouri compromise. Think of that! Gerrit Smith is in Congress now, and has made a noble speech. He was interrupted by a member from Maryland, who tried to put him down at the outset by saying, It appears that the gentleman from New York intends to give us an anti-slavery speech. With dignified courtesy, Mr. Smith replied, I do intend to make an anti-slavery speech; and if the gentleman from Maryland wishes to make a pro-slavery speech, I shall listen to him with all courtesy. He is the first one that has stood up like a man, and boldly professed to be an abolitionist. The Southerners respected him, in spite of themselves; for honesty and boldness will be respected. It is reported that one said to another, We have not only got an honest man among us, but the best debater of us all. The honest man was a rarity! Dear Sarah's beautiful articles found a ready sale at th
S. S. Russell (search for this): chapter 59
wing their masters ample leisure for the service of the state, in the Senate or the field. We learn from Juvenal that they were the most useful and capable servants, whether as pimps or professors of rhetoric. Now do you know that my inmost soul rejoices in all these manifestations of contempt? The North richly deserves them, and I have a faint hope that they may be heaped on till some of the old spirit is roused. There was a large meeting at Faneuil Hall when the slave was arrested. Mr. Russell presided, and the speeches and resolutions were uncommonly spirited and eloquent. But they talked boldly of a rescue the next morning, and so did more harm than good by forewarning the Southerners, and giving them time to summon a great array of United States troops. If they had only struck when the iron was hot, and used very slight precautions, I think the poor slave might have been rescued without shedding blood. But it was not done, and order reigns in Warsaw, as the Russian offici
Francis G. Shaw (search for this): chapter 59
To Francis G. Shaw. Wayland, January 22, 1854. Did you ever see, among a series of frescoes by Correggio, somewhere in Italy, Diana with a crescent on her brow, guiding her chariot through the clouds? The engraving of it by Toschi is, to me, the most graceful, beautiful, altogether perfect thing I ever did see. It is a glorious woman, and yet, in expression, the real full moon, guiding her bright chariot through the heavens. If I lived where it was I should make a little golden altar, and burn incense before it. You see there is no washing my Greek heathenism out of me. What is the reason that a region so totally unlike my homely environment in the outward world has always seemed to me so like a remembered home? . . . Things are going on at a terrible rate on the slavery question. They are trying in Congress to vote payment to the piratical claimants of the Amistad, and to abolish the obligation of Southerners in the Missouri compromise. Think of that! Gerrit Smith is in
Gerrit Smith (search for this): chapter 59
Things are going on at a terrible rate on the slavery question. They are trying in Congress to vote payment to the piratical claimants of the Amistad, and to abolish the obligation of Southerners in the Missouri compromise. Think of that! Gerrit Smith is in Congress now, and has made a noble speech. He was interrupted by a member from Maryland, who tried to put him down at the outset by saying, It appears that the gentleman from New York intends to give us an anti-slavery speech. With dignified courtesy, Mr. Smith replied, I do intend to make an anti-slavery speech; and if the gentleman from Maryland wishes to make a pro-slavery speech, I shall listen to him with all courtesy. He is the first one that has stood up like a man, and boldly professed to be an abolitionist. The Southerners respected him, in spite of themselves; for honesty and boldness will be respected. It is reported that one said to another, We have not only got an honest man among us, but the best debater of
To Francis G. Shaw. Wayland, January 22, 1854. Did you ever see, among a series of frescoes by Correggio, somewhere in Italy, Diana with a crescent on her brow, guiding her chariot through the clouds? The engraving of it by Toschi is, to me, the most graceful, beautiful, altogether perfect thing I ever did see. It is a glorious woman, and yet, in expression, the real full moon, guiding her bright chariot through the heavens. If I lived where it was I should make a little golden altar, and burn incense before it. You see there is no washing my Greek heathenism out of me. What is the reason that a region so totally unlike my homely environment in the outward world has always seemed to me so like a remembered home? . . . Things are going on at a terrible rate on the slavery question. They are trying in Congress to vote payment to the piratical claimants of the Amistad, and to abolish the obligation of Southerners in the Missouri compromise. Think of that! Gerrit Smith is in
Anthony Burns (search for this): chapter 59
rvile to the slave interest as the present one. They have passed the Nebraska Bill in open defiance of the people. . . . These measures have been followed up by the most outrageous insults and aggressions upon the North. Only three days ago another poor slave was hunted in Boston, and though a pretty general indignation was excited, he was given up by the Boston magistrates and triumphantly carried back to bondage, guarded by a strong escort of United States troops. The rendition of Anthony Burns. The court-house was nearly filled with troops and hired ruffians, armed with cutlasses and bowie-knives. No citizen was allowed to enter without a pass, as is the custom with slaves; and these passes were obtained with great difficulty, none being given to any one suspected of being friendly to the slave. The Rev. Samuel May had his pass taken from him, and he was thrust out rudely by the soldiers. Men were even arrested and imprisoned for merely making observations to each other whi
Samuel May (search for this): chapter 59
excited, he was given up by the Boston magistrates and triumphantly carried back to bondage, guarded by a strong escort of United States troops. The rendition of Anthony Burns. The court-house was nearly filled with troops and hired ruffians, armed with cutlasses and bowie-knives. No citizen was allowed to enter without a pass, as is the custom with slaves; and these passes were obtained with great difficulty, none being given to any one suspected of being friendly to the slave. The Rev. Samuel May had his pass taken from him, and he was thrust out rudely by the soldiers. Men were even arrested and imprisoned for merely making observations to each other which the ruling powers considered dangerous. My dear friend, my very soul is sick in view of these things. They tell me The Lord will surely arise for the sighing of the poor and the needy, as he has promised. I think to myself, Oh yes, that promise was made some three thousand years ago, and the fulfilment seems as far off
January 22nd, 1854 AD (search for this): chapter 59
To Francis G. Shaw. Wayland, January 22, 1854. Did you ever see, among a series of frescoes by Correggio, somewhere in Italy, Diana with a crescent on her brow, guiding her chariot through the clouds? The engraving of it by Toschi is, to me, the most graceful, beautiful, altogether perfect thing I ever did see. It is a glorious woman, and yet, in expression, the real full moon, guiding her bright chariot through the heavens. If I lived where it was I should make a little golden altar, and burn incense before it. You see there is no washing my Greek heathenism out of me. What is the reason that a region so totally unlike my homely environment in the outward world has always seemed to me so like a remembered home? . . . Things are going on at a terrible rate on the slavery question. They are trying in Congress to vote payment to the piratical claimants of the Amistad, and to abolish the obligation of Southerners in the Missouri compromise. Think of that! Gerrit Smith is in C