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Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
so high a tone in respect to refinement and purity that he might fitly be called the Sir Galahad of American literature. The man who, while already stricken with pulmonary disease, could serve for many months in the peculiarly arduous life of a Confederate cavalryman had some right to an opinion as to what constitutes true manhood, and his criticism on certain recent theories in this direction are peculiarly entitled to weight. In Lanier's lectures before the Johns Hopkins University at Baltimore upon The English novel and its development he has much to say upon what I may call the anti-kid-glove literature, which is really no better than the kid-glove literature, at which it affects to protest. Lanier quotes the lines of a poet, Fear grace, fear elegance, civilization, delicatesse, and again were this poet rejoices in America because here are the roughs, beards,... combativeness, and the like; and shows how far were the founders of the republic — Washington, Jefferson, Franklin,
Abigail Adams (search for this): chapter 58
e upon The English novel and its development he has much to say upon what I may call the anti-kid-glove literature, which is really no better than the kid-glove literature, at which it affects to protest. Lanier quotes the lines of a poet, Fear grace, fear elegance, civilization, delicatesse, and again were this poet rejoices in America because here are the roughs, beards,... combativeness, and the like; and shows how far were the founders of the republic — Washington, Jefferson, Franklin, Adams — from this theory that there can be no manhood in decent clothes or well-bred manners. He justly complains that this rougher school has really as much dandyism about it as the other-the dandyism of the roustabout, he calls it; that it poses and attitudinizes and is the extreme of sophistication in writing. If we must have dandyism in our art, he adds, surely the softer sort, which at least leans towards decorum and gentility, is preferable. Then, going beyond literature to the foundation
were once worn to intimidate a foe. The fierce head-dress of the drum-major is the reductio ad absurdum, or extreme instance, of this childish method, which still survives among the Chinese, and may be seen in Japanese pictures. In an old military text-book the Portuguese soldiers were ordered to attack their opponents with ferocious countenances. But civilization has set aside all this merely physical irrepressiveness and substituted invention. A monk, not a soldier, invented gunpowder. Savage strength is powerless against the needle-gun and the unseen torpedo. This does not annihilate the value of physical health and vigor, but it readapts their use. The young man even in a military school has his bodily health trained, not that he may grasp his opponent in his mighty arms and throw him to the earth, as formerly, but that he may have his head clear, his nerves in equilibrium, his action prompt. It is altogether fitting that an age whose promise is in this direction should be an
Sidney Lanier (search for this): chapter 58
is criticism on certain recent theories in this direction are peculiarly entitled to weight. In Lanier's lectures before the Johns Hopkins University at Baltimore upon The English novel and its develature, which is really no better than the kid-glove literature, at which it affects to protest. Lanier quotes the lines of a poet, Fear grace, fear elegance, civilization, delicatesse, and again were with physical health or strength, and that the true athlete is he who is ruler over himself. Lanier complains of this new type of democracy --the merely brawny and sinewy-that it has no provision — a thing which the writer criticised had not done. And then, more consistently than many men, Lanier goes on to illustrate the same principle from the life of a woman. He describes a woman of a power. It is now a rare thing for soldiers to fight hand to hand, even in the cavalry, to which Lanier belonged. The race is not to the swift nor the battie to the strong. The weakest hand may tou
Thomas Carlyle (search for this): chapter 58
While civilization improves men's and women's bodies on the whole-although it was once thought to impair them — it gives the brain a swifter development and makes that the source of power. It is now a rare thing for soldiers to fight hand to hand, even in the cavalry, to which Lanier belonged. The race is not to the swift nor the battie to the strong. The weakest hand may touch off the cannon whose ball shall overtake the swiftest runner, miles away. It is the virtue of gunpowder, as Carlyle has said, that it makes all men alike tall. There still remain among some of our troops those caps of imitation bear-skin which were once worn to intimidate a foe. The fierce head-dress of the drum-major is the reductio ad absurdum, or extreme instance, of this childish method, which still survives among the Chinese, and may be seen in Japanese pictures. In an old military text-book the Portuguese soldiers were ordered to attack their opponents with ferocious countenances. But civilizati
Benjamin Franklin (search for this): chapter 58
t Baltimore upon The English novel and its development he has much to say upon what I may call the anti-kid-glove literature, which is really no better than the kid-glove literature, at which it affects to protest. Lanier quotes the lines of a poet, Fear grace, fear elegance, civilization, delicatesse, and again were this poet rejoices in America because here are the roughs, beards,... combativeness, and the like; and shows how far were the founders of the republic — Washington, Jefferson, Franklin, Adams — from this theory that there can be no manhood in decent clothes or well-bred manners. He justly complains that this rougher school has really as much dandyism about it as the other-the dandyism of the roustabout, he calls it; that it poses and attitudinizes and is the extreme of sophistication in writing. If we must have dandyism in our art, he adds, surely the softer sort, which at least leans towards decorum and gentility, is preferable. Then, going beyond literature to the f
Thomas Jefferson (search for this): chapter 58
iversity at Baltimore upon The English novel and its development he has much to say upon what I may call the anti-kid-glove literature, which is really no better than the kid-glove literature, at which it affects to protest. Lanier quotes the lines of a poet, Fear grace, fear elegance, civilization, delicatesse, and again were this poet rejoices in America because here are the roughs, beards,... combativeness, and the like; and shows how far were the founders of the republic — Washington, Jefferson, Franklin, Adams — from this theory that there can be no manhood in decent clothes or well-bred manners. He justly complains that this rougher school has really as much dandyism about it as the other-the dandyism of the roustabout, he calls it; that it poses and attitudinizes and is the extreme of sophistication in writing. If we must have dandyism in our art, he adds, surely the softer sort, which at least leans towards decorum and gentility, is preferable. Then, going beyond literatu