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Browsing named entities in a specific section of A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864.. Search the whole document.

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Centreville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
is a good picture of this fight in Harper's Weekly of July, 1862. The battle of Malvern Hills was fought next day, in which, also, the battery participated. This was the sixth of the seven days fighting. Upon the defeat of Pope's army the Army of the Potomac marched to his support, and Captain Porter came up with his battery after the crushing defeat of the Second Bull Run, or Manassas, or Gainesville, as it is variously called, and subsequently held a covering position in the works at Centreville. The battery subsequently took part in the advance into Maryland, and participated in the action at Crampton's Gap, where the Sixth Corps, under cover of the artillery fire, charged up the slopes of the Blue Ridge. Following close upon this came Antietam, where Porter's battery had position in the open fields in front of the woods and close to the cornfield where such terrible slaughter took place. After this battle, urgent private business compelled Captain Porter to apply for leave
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
n brilliancy by any other of the war, was brought to an end. The Confederate army of the valley was in effect destroyed; Maryland was never more invaded or the capital again menaced. The old Sixth Corps returned to the James to participate in the moted to a major generalship in July, 1862. Gen. Smith led the Second Division of the Sixth Corps, at Crampton's Gap, in Maryland; and at Antietam his division, coming to the relief of Sedgwick and Crawford, in the afternoon of the 17th of September,second officer, and served with honor during the term of enlistment of his company. The scene of its-operations was central Maryland, being in the department commanded by Gen. Butler. Lieut. Porter, whose urbanity made him ever popular with officersbsequently held a covering position in the works at Centreville. The battery subsequently took part in the advance into Maryland, and participated in the action at Crampton's Gap, where the Sixth Corps, under cover of the artillery fire, charged up
Gainesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
s repulsed with great slaughter, Porter's howitzers making wide gaps in the enemy's lines. There is a good picture of this fight in Harper's Weekly of July, 1862. The battle of Malvern Hills was fought next day, in which, also, the battery participated. This was the sixth of the seven days fighting. Upon the defeat of Pope's army the Army of the Potomac marched to his support, and Captain Porter came up with his battery after the crushing defeat of the Second Bull Run, or Manassas, or Gainesville, as it is variously called, and subsequently held a covering position in the works at Centreville. The battery subsequently took part in the advance into Maryland, and participated in the action at Crampton's Gap, where the Sixth Corps, under cover of the artillery fire, charged up the slopes of the Blue Ridge. Following close upon this came Antietam, where Porter's battery had position in the open fields in front of the woods and close to the cornfield where such terrible slaughter too
Cerro Gordo, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
e city of New York. Gen. Jno. Sedgwick Was born in Cornwall, Ct., September 13, 1813. Graduated at West Point, July, 1837. In this year, as a junior second lieutenant of artillery, he made a campaign against the Seminoles in Florida. Subsequently he served upon the northern frontier in the Canada border troubles. Young Sedgwick accompanied Scott's expedition to Vera Cruz, and participated in the battles that followed the surrender of that port, winning for gallantry displayed at Cerro Gordo, Churubusco, Molino del Rey and Chapultepec, the brevets of captain and major. He was present during the assault upon the Mexican capital, and at its capture. He was made lieutenant colonel of cavalry in the Second United States; afterward, in the same year, was commissioned colonel of the First United States Cavalry; this was in August, and in the latter part of that month, he was made brigadier general of volunteers. During the fall and winter of 1861, Gen. Sedgwick commanded a briga
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ng the winter of 1861, commanded the Vermont brigade, then in Sumner's division. He led this command at Lee's Mills, the most important incident of the siege of Yorktown. He participated in the battle of Williamsburg, as commander of a division in Sumner's corps. Upon the formation of the Sixth Army Corps, Gen. Smith's commancommanded a brigade of Heintzelman's division. In the Peninsula campaign, he was at the head of a division of Sumner's Corps, which participated in the siege of Yorktown, and the battle of Fair Oaks, where their arrival after a toilsome march largely contributed to the favorable ending of that engagement. His command distinguish old Sixth Corps, with whose glorious record the history of the battery is inseparably connected. It subsequently took a prominent part in the siege and fall of Yorktown, and in the battle of West Point. After the retreat of the enemy beyond the Chickahominy Porter's battery took position at Mechanicsville, within view of the st
Vera Cruz, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
he volunteer service in 1865, and in the regular army in 1867. He is at present president of the police commission of the city of New York. Gen. Jno. Sedgwick Was born in Cornwall, Ct., September 13, 1813. Graduated at West Point, July, 1837. In this year, as a junior second lieutenant of artillery, he made a campaign against the Seminoles in Florida. Subsequently he served upon the northern frontier in the Canada border troubles. Young Sedgwick accompanied Scott's expedition to Vera Cruz, and participated in the battles that followed the surrender of that port, winning for gallantry displayed at Cerro Gordo, Churubusco, Molino del Rey and Chapultepec, the brevets of captain and major. He was present during the assault upon the Mexican capital, and at its capture. He was made lieutenant colonel of cavalry in the Second United States; afterward, in the same year, was commissioned colonel of the First United States Cavalry; this was in August, and in the latter part of that
Cornwall, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ed in the battle of Missionary Ridge. Returning to the department of Virginia in March, 1864, he was placed in command of the Eighteenth Corps; rendered important service at Cold Harbor, June 1 to 3, and was conspicuous in the events incident to the siege of Petersburg. Gen. Smith resigned his commission in the volunteer service in 1865, and in the regular army in 1867. He is at present president of the police commission of the city of New York. Gen. Jno. Sedgwick Was born in Cornwall, Ct., September 13, 1813. Graduated at West Point, July, 1837. In this year, as a junior second lieutenant of artillery, he made a campaign against the Seminoles in Florida. Subsequently he served upon the northern frontier in the Canada border troubles. Young Sedgwick accompanied Scott's expedition to Vera Cruz, and participated in the battles that followed the surrender of that port, winning for gallantry displayed at Cerro Gordo, Churubusco, Molino del Rey and Chapultepec, the brevets
Cedar Creek (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
aid he was borne from the field upon the back of Comrade Lynch, who ministered to him in his last moments. During the next fortnight after the departure of the long train from Harrisonburg, Sheridan, having pursued the remnant of the enemy to Port Republic, and having sent his cavalry east and west destroying provisions and munitions, retired down the valley burning all the grain and forage that remained, as he passed, so that the enemy should find no subsistence there. He had reached Cedar Creek and encamped upon its banks on the 15th of October, and, apprehending no danger, had gone upon a visit to Washington. Early, reinforced, having stealthily followed down the valley, determined to surprise the unsuspecting army before him. In this he succeeded perfectly, flanking the Eighth Corps on both sides in the dense darkness, and rushing into the camps with a fearful yell, just before daylight, October 19; and in less than a half hour, this Federal corps was fleeing, panic-strick
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
n the chief command of the Army of the Potomac, after the winter of 1862, found Gen. Sedgwick at the head of the Sixth Corps, as the commander of which he is known to fame. In May, 1863, he was ordered by Gen. Hooker to carry the heights of Fredericksburg, and form a junction with the main army at Chancellorsville. The town was occupied on Sunday morning, May 3, with little opposition, but the storming of the heights behind it cost the lives of several thousand men. The advance of the Sixth Cuty as it presented itself to him. As captain of the First Massachusetts Battery, he was recognized in the army corps to which that command was attached, as one of the ablest artillery officers in the volunteer service. He led his company at Fredericksburg, Salem Heights, Gettysburg, Mine Run, 1863; in the campaigns from Brandy Station to Petersburg in the spring and summer of 1864, he handled his command with admirable judgment and consummate skill. In August, 1864, the Sixth Corps, having be
Churubusco (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
w York. Gen. Jno. Sedgwick Was born in Cornwall, Ct., September 13, 1813. Graduated at West Point, July, 1837. In this year, as a junior second lieutenant of artillery, he made a campaign against the Seminoles in Florida. Subsequently he served upon the northern frontier in the Canada border troubles. Young Sedgwick accompanied Scott's expedition to Vera Cruz, and participated in the battles that followed the surrender of that port, winning for gallantry displayed at Cerro Gordo, Churubusco, Molino del Rey and Chapultepec, the brevets of captain and major. He was present during the assault upon the Mexican capital, and at its capture. He was made lieutenant colonel of cavalry in the Second United States; afterward, in the same year, was commissioned colonel of the First United States Cavalry; this was in August, and in the latter part of that month, he was made brigadier general of volunteers. During the fall and winter of 1861, Gen. Sedgwick commanded a brigade of Heintze
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