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Topeka (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
tage connection now to the Missouri River below Council Bluffs—thence about 100 miles on foot to Topeka. . .. Beneath the stir of civil war we keep up a more perfectly placid domestic existence tr Rev. Gen. Thos. Wentworth Higginson Centre! On September 24, Mr. Higginson wrote home from Topeka:— I got here yesterday afternoon after six days ride and walk (chiefly the former) across friend, Dr. Seth Rogers (afterward surgeon of his regiment):— Yesterday morning I waked at Topeka and found the house surrounded by dragoons. To my amazement, on going out, the Captain addresseska City, organizing and directing for a train of 150 emigrants, and then travelled with them to Topeka in six days, camping at night; since then I have been in Topeka, Lecompton, Lenora and LeavenworTopeka, Lecompton, Lenora and Leavenworth. . . . Tell Sam I had an Allen's Rifle with me which is an improvement on Sharp's, but had no occasion to shoot anything with it except a superb hawk, whose wings I carry home as a Kansas trophy. <
Nebraska (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
weary were even my four days and nights of staging (after as many more of railroad travel), I can only wonder at the patience and fortitude which the present emigrants have shown. As soon as one approaches the Missouri River, even in Iowa and Nebraska, he begins to feel as if he were in France or Austria. Men are very cautious in defining their position, and wait to hear what others will say. Then, perhaps, their tongues are slightly loosed, if they think there are no spies about them. But s. On his return trip from the afflicted territory Mr. Higginson wrote:— Steamboat Cataract, aground on a bank in the Missouri River, Oct. 9th, 1856. My best hope is that the contest may be at once transferred to more favorable soil, Nebraska or Iowa, and result in a disruption of the Union; for I am sure that the disease is too deep for cure without amputation. I left here on Sept. 9th for six weeks; reached Nebraska City through Iowa in ten days, a weary stage journey. Staid n
Lawrence, Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
half a mile through the grass while the sentinels' backs were turned. The bravest young men of Lawrence were put under arrest, charged with treason, murder, arson, robbery, and what not; while not a ll day for Kansas and the evenings for Anti-Slavery fair! Meantime, the traveller wrote from Lawrence, September 28, to his friend, Dr. Seth Rogers (afterward surgeon of his regiment):— Yeste of multitudes, many of whom are as badly off as this man. In a letter to the Tribune, dated Lawrence, October 4, Mr. Higginson said:— Last Sunday I preached in this place (though I must say ted some of the faith, hope and strength I had so long needed. Mr. Higginson spoke again at Lawrence October 4, and the next day went to Leavenworth to witness a Border Ruffian election. On McCarand in a day or two there'll be some gentlemen here that know him. (N. B. At my last speech in Lawrence, I was warned that three Missouri spies were present.) It's well we've got him here, to take ca
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
uisiana and Mississippi market, for which I will pay the highest cash prices. All those who have Negroes for sale would do well to give me a call. I can always be seen at the City Hotel, or at Mr. Thompson's Negro-yard, No. 67, Locust St., St. Louis, Mo. John Mattingly. Negroes wanted and for sale.—Wanted and for sale Negroes of all kinds, at my office, No. 67, Locust St., between 2d and 3d Sts., St. Louis, Mo. Having a good and safe yard to board and keep Negroes, I will buy and sell oSt. Louis, Mo. Having a good and safe yard to board and keep Negroes, I will buy and sell on commission as low as any other house in this city. Please to give me a call. Corbin Thompson. I took an early opportunity to call on Mr. Corbin Thompson. I found him in the doorway of a little wooden office, like a livery-stable office in one of our cities; he being a large, lounging, good-natured looking man, not unlike a reputable stable-keeper in appearance and manner. Inside his stable, alas! I saw his dusky stock, and he readily acceded to my desire to take a nearer look at them.
France (France) (search for this): chapter 10
her, camping often without wood, and sometimes without water, and obliged to carry with them every eatable they use. It is no wonder that they often fall sick on the way; and when I consider how infinitely weary were even my four days and nights of staging (after as many more of railroad travel), I can only wonder at the patience and fortitude which the present emigrants have shown. As soon as one approaches the Missouri River, even in Iowa and Nebraska, he begins to feel as if he were in France or Austria. Men are very cautious in defining their position, and wait to hear what others will say. Then, perhaps, their tongues are slightly loosed, if they think there are no spies about them. But it is no slight risk when a man may have to pay with his life, further down the river, for a free word, spoken at Council Bluffs or Sidney, both Pro-Slavery towns. The first night I spent in this place, it seemed as if a symbolical pageant had been got up to remind me where I was. I sat wr
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
meet our disarmed troops in St. Louis—poor things. I shall send them on through Iowa, where Stowell has gone before them. At St. Louis, Mr. Higginson chartered a stirts and blankets .. At present no person, without actually travelling across Iowa, can appreciate the injury done by the closing of the Missouri River. Emigrantst emigrants have shown. As soon as one approaches the Missouri River, even in Iowa and Nebraska, he begins to feel as if he were in France or Austria. Men are versas had ever had, they pronounced Governor Geary to be; and they were going into Iowa to wait for better times. Will you give up Kansas? I asked. Never! was the r that the contest may be at once transferred to more favorable soil, Nebraska or Iowa, and result in a disruption of the Union; for I am sure that the disease is tootation. I left here on Sept. 9th for six weeks; reached Nebraska City through Iowa in ten days, a weary stage journey. Staid nine days in and near Nebraska City,
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
day or two there'll be some gentlemen here that know him. (N. B. At my last speech in Lawrence, I was warned that three Missouri spies were present.) It's well we've got him here, to take care of him, said one. Won't our boys enjoy running him out o the time and widely copied, both in America and in England. I have before been in other slave States, but never in Missouri. The first thing that struck me on arriving in this city was the apparent absence of the Negro race. In a crowd of a t readily. The Negroes or Niggers, he said (seldom employing the Virginia phrases servants or people ), came mostly from Missouri or Virginia, and were with him but a little while. Buy when I can and sell when I can, that's my way; and never ask no England mother), might give way to, at such an offer from the very kindest man who ever chewed tobacco in the streets of Missouri! Human nature is a rather unconquerable thing, after all, is n't it? My kind purchaser looked annoyed, and turned
Hungary (Hungary) (search for this): chapter 10
ons on the two sides of the river here, moving away in despair. . . . The people are braver than anything I ever dreamed of, and when they once adopt the policy of resistance to the United States will do it. But they will wait till after election first. This winter there will be much suffering, but not from the absence of food, only the money to buy it. All employment has been suspended and still is so. The story is continued from A Ride Through Kansas:— It was like entering Hungary just after the treachery of Gorgey. Each had his story to tell of arrests and tyrannies; how a Pro-Slavery witness had only to point at a man as identified with any measure of public defence, and he was seized at once. Several whom we met had been arrested in person, herded with a hundred others, like cattle, on the bare prairie, been scantily fed once a day, and escaped by rolling half a mile through the grass while the sentinels' backs were turned. The bravest young men of Lawrence we
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
y, which I have hitherto been unofficially—this will save me trouble by putting funds in my hands. . . . A party left Boston for Kansas on Tuesday— 20 were from Maine and the strongest looking men I ever saw—mostly in red shirts. In September Mr. Higginson was made an agent of the Kansas National Committee, and in this capacity went to Kansas to superintend the movements of these very Maine lumbermen. In his letters to the New York Tribune describing this trip, and later printed in a little pamphlet called A Ride Through Kansas, he says:— Coming from a land where millionaires think themselves generous in giving fifty dollars to Kansas, I convery charged upon a band of extremely nude Indians, taking them for Missourians. .. We had in our camps some twenty tents and thirty wagons; including parties from Maine, Mass., Vt., Illinois, etc., and six large families from Indiana. On the other hand, we met quite as many going out of Kansas, some to avoid arrest, others from
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
e was sent to Chicago and St. Louis to give aid and advice to a party from Massachusetts who, to quote a newspaper account, had fallen among thieves. From Alton, I. Higginson responded in the Boston Journal: I have seen frightened men, in Massachusetts and elsewhere, and I never saw men look less like them than did Dr. Cutter'er . . . pledging themselves to die, if need be, but to redeem the honor of Massachusetts. From the bottom of my heart I felt with them; one word from me would havein our camps some twenty tents and thirty wagons; including parties from Maine, Mass., Vt., Illinois, etc., and six large families from Indiana. On the other hand, d not go there even to see an underground railroad, for I had seen that in Massachusetts. I wanted to see something above the ground. All my life I had been a cit and material, which is denied us now. You know that even now the credit of Massachusetts Stocks is far higher in Europe than [that] of United States Stocks, and thi
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