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Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
els, was my mother's sister, and the poet was present at the wedding. A visit made soon afterward to my kindred in Harper's Ferry was described by Colonel Higginson in a letter to his sister:— You can imagine nothing more curious than our arrival at Harper's Ferry. It was in the evening . . . The train stopped in a dismantled sort of station where stood an old man with soft white hair on his shoulders holding a lantern and attended by two blooming, fair-haired daughters; they seized usonging also to him. From another ruined house the cow looks out all day . . . . Our arriving was an excitement to all Harper's Ferry. All knew that the bridal party was coming. In the evening came Jacob [a Negro factotum]. He brought the largest roentries alternating with the commonest things. The road we came was that over which they were brought, wounded, from Harper's Ferry. The only memorial of him at the latter place is the little building close by the railroad—the engine house which he
Colorado Springs (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
e year he went West on a lecture trip and wrote to his sister:— Kansas City, June 5, 1888. I have got so far, lecturing last night at Lawrence (University), here to-night . . . speaking at Topeka on Thursday, going Friday morn to Colorado Springs . . . . I have enjoyed the trip greatly. . . . I saw many of the old Kansasers and many of the new; all Kansas is transformed from bareness to a land of trees and hedges, greatly to its improvement and I had a fine reception from the Students. Colorado Springs, June 11. Here I have revelled in flowers and cañons. . . . Nothing disappoints except that the prairies when green are a far paler green than we are used to and Pike's Peak, though it seems to hang directly above the town and is still snow-clad, is far less picturesque and companionable than our New England mountains. It was impossible not to be drawn into politics and, in the fall of 1888, Colonel Higginson was nominated as Representative to Congress by the Democr
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ed shabby and ruined by day; [but there were Turkey rugs and the rustle of silk gowns in the crumbling old house]. During the war they were here when only five families staid in the town. After eight all windows had to be darkened, otherwise the Union pickets fired on them from the Maryland heights and the rebels from the other side. There were bullet marks on the table. . .. We had a beautiful drive up the Shenandoah hills with Blue Ridge always in sight, amid large farms looking like Pennsylvania and very fertile. We went to Charlestown, eight miles, a flourishing village with nice houses and buildings. Here we saw the jail yard where John Brown was confined, the field where he was executed, the new court house on the site where he was tried, and most interesting of all, the very records of the trial of him and his men—the successive entries alternating with the commonest things. The road we came was that over which they were brought, wounded, from Harper's Ferry. The only mem
Bangor (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
public gatherings which he frequently attended was the meeting of the Social Science Association at Saratoga, where he presided over the educational department or gave addresses. He sometimes lectured at Chautauqua which he called An innocent Saratoga. When he went forth on these expeditions to scream among his fellows, as an irreverent friend was fond of quoting from Bryant's Waterfowl, unforeseen difficulties sometimes arose. In such cases a happy versatility saved the day, as when in Bangor, in 1887:— Last night I had a good lecture, though I learned just as we went into the church door that the subject was different from what I had supposed, so that I had to switch my thoughts off very suddenly. In January, 1888, he meditated:— It is curious to see how my 64th birthday seems the turning-point for my reputation such as it is. I had a notice of nearly a column with a horrible portrait in a Detroit newspaper and a good many western letters referring to it in one w
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
looked around and discovered with alarm that the child of four was fast asleep. After that he decided to ride alone. When Margaret was still a small child we spent three successive summers on a farm in Holden, Massachusetts, a village near Worcester. It was Colonel Higginson's delight both there and in Cambridge to amuse Margaret's little friends by making bonfires and roasting potatoes and apples in the embers. He wrote to his sister: We have now a cow, calf, dog, two white fantail pigillips Brooks who preached at St. John's Chapel. A curious result of this meeting was the arrival at our home, on the same evening, of six bottles of wine labelled For a man who has the courage of his convictions. There happened to be in Worcester in this very year a reunion of the Company which Colonel Higginson had recruited. It was a bewildering evening and night, he wrote, living back 21 years in an hour. The youngest member of the Company who enlisted at 17 is far grayer than I.
Cambridgeport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
that I wrote it, for it is the first strong bit of purely imaginative work I ever did and I shall always be glad to know that I could do it, and it was a real vacation after so much historical and critical work . . . . I like to do things in order to know that I can do them; and the old spirit of adventurousness still lives in me. The latter statement was proved when the strike of the street-car employees in Cambridge occurred, and he wrote in his diary in March, 1887:— Evening to Cambridgeport to meet procession of strikers—rode through them on platform of car; one stone hit me. Find myself enjoying the little danger as of yore. After another car-ride he reported:— The young trolley conductor told me that he had just taken Cheerful Yesterdays from the library and that it was the third book of mine he had read. He spoke especially of the anti-slavery part and has been sorry not to hear me on Irish wrongs at Town Hall. In May, 1886, Emily Dickinson died. Her acquaint<
Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
culty; they are only checked by the multiplicity of cares and interests that come with advancing years. On his sixty-third birthday, the author wrote, Can work better than ever in my life. And again:— Had a striking instance to-day of that great wealth and activity of mind which seems to come to me in rushes for a short time together especially the first thing in the morning. In fifteen minutes . . . I entirely planned two addresses on distinct subjects —the birthday address at Concord on Emerson and the address for the blind . . . . For all this—but chiefly for my wife, child and home, let me give thanks . . . . Whenever I think of illness or death, then it seems beautiful to have one child on earth and one in heaven. In 1882, he began the chapters of his Larger History of the United States, which were published in Harper's Magazine; of these he told his sister, August 24, 1883, I have written one of my Harper's papers regularly every month for the last eleven months<
Cowpens (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
litics' as people say, but simply took it as it came my way knowing it would not last long . . . . I also tried nearly a year ago to get off the staff thinking I had done the Governor all the services I could, but he was unwilling . . . going to Cowpens was a great privilege and opportunity and in a manner a piece of poetic justice. . . . Last summer the Governor wished me to be a trustee of a lunatic hospital which I declined. This year after resigning my place on staff he wished me to take either a similar trusteeship vacant—or to go on the Board of Education. With some reluctance I did the latter. The allusion to Cowpens referred to the address which Colonel Higginson gave in May, 1881, at Spartansburg, South Carolina, the occasion being the celebration of the Battle of Cowpens during the Revolution, which Bancroft called the most extraordinary victory of the war. Governor Long had requested his chief of staff to represent Massachusetts and incidentally the original New En
Louisa, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ntries alternating with the commonest things. The road we came was that over which they were brought, wounded, from Harper's Ferry. The only memorial of him at the latter place is the little building close by the railroad—the engine house which he held—which has John Brown's Fort painted on it. After this trip, we began housekeeping, and then Colonel Higginson earnestly threw himself into the interests of his native town. In January, 1880, our first little daughter was born and called Louisa for her grandmother Higginson. On the day that his lifelong wish for a child was realized, Colonel Higginson wrote in his journal:— God! May I be worthy of the wonderful moment when I first looked round and saw the face of my child . . . .How trivial seem all personal aims and ambitions beside the fact that I am at last the father of a child. Should she die to-morrow she will still be my child somewhere. But she will not die. When seven days old the baby received a visit from th<
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
wished me to take either a similar trusteeship vacant—or to go on the Board of Education. With some reluctance I did the latter. The allusion to Cowpens referred to the address which Colonel Higginson gave in May, 1881, at Spartansburg, South Carolina, the occasion being the celebration of the Battle of Cowpens during the Revolution, which Bancroft called the most extraordinary victory of the war. Governor Long had requested his chief of staff to represent Massachusetts and incidentally t to hear me on Irish wrongs at Town Hall. In May, 1886, Emily Dickinson died. Her acquaintance with Colonel Higginson began in 1862, when she wrote to him enclosing some poems and asking his opinion of her verse. While he was in camp in South Carolina she wrote again to ask if he would be her preceptor. Henceforth her letters, in extraordinary script, were signed your scholar. One summer he made his unseen correspondent a long-delayed visit which he has described in the volume called Ca
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