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January 13th (search for this): chapter 16
ffer of a raw egg, which seems a whole Christmas dinner after eight weeks of milk-cure! . . . Some people think I write better than formerly, in my horizontal attitude! On the cover of the diary for 1896, he wrote:— Now that I begin to know a little, I die. St. Augustine. And within the covers are these entries:— Jan. 6. For 10 weeks to-morrow I have had absolutely no nourishment but milk. . . . I have done a great deal of reading and writing on this and some talking. Jan. 13. Per contra, had to give up the hope of working on the history in bed. I cannot handle the wide sheets or heavy books. It is a great disappointment. Feb. 6. Wedding Day celebrated, not unprosaically, by an Easter lily and a cup of mutton broth. Delicious! beyond my dreams! It is almost worth three months of milk alone to get the flavor of that first cup of broth. Mar. 1. I still remain with my head in perfect condition, able to write ad libitum. I enjoy life and have adapted
March 19th (search for this): chapter 16
had remembered more of the discourse than any of those who criticized him. The 1906 diary records:— Feb. 12. Evening at North End school—very turbulent—Italian boys, but I enjoyed talking to them, until I read from Army Life which was a mistake. Never read before children. Mar. 12. Boston before legislative committee at State House, with 8 old soldiers against me. This meeting was to consider the erection of a statue to General Butler, which Colonel Higginson opposed. Mar. 19. At Binghamton, N. Y. P. M. Lecture and had good audience of perhaps 250 in hard storm. June 28. Phi Beta Kappa. At meeting, gave notice of amendment next year in regard to women's admission to dinner. Two grandchildren came to cheer these later days, the first a boy named Wentworth born in 1906, of whom he wrote:— The beautiful and happy baby makes my health or illness a secondary trifle—if I can only pass quietly away without those melancholy intermediate days or we
January 6th (search for this): chapter 16
ith pillows. On Christmas Day he wrote to his friends at the Cambridge Public Library:— I am moving slowly along and have now held out to me the munificent offer of a raw egg, which seems a whole Christmas dinner after eight weeks of milk-cure! . . . Some people think I write better than formerly, in my horizontal attitude! On the cover of the diary for 1896, he wrote:— Now that I begin to know a little, I die. St. Augustine. And within the covers are these entries:— Jan. 6. For 10 weeks to-morrow I have had absolutely no nourishment but milk. . . . I have done a great deal of reading and writing on this and some talking. Jan. 13. Per contra, had to give up the hope of working on the history in bed. I cannot handle the wide sheets or heavy books. It is a great disappointment. Feb. 6. Wedding Day celebrated, not unprosaically, by an Easter lily and a cup of mutton broth. Delicious! beyond my dreams! It is almost worth three months of milk alone to<
March 12th (search for this): chapter 16
ude. At any rate he considered it his duty to attend church semi-occasionally, both summer and winter. His family rallied him for sleeping through the sermon, but in such cases it always happened that he had remembered more of the discourse than any of those who criticized him. The 1906 diary records:— Feb. 12. Evening at North End school—very turbulent—Italian boys, but I enjoyed talking to them, until I read from Army Life which was a mistake. Never read before children. Mar. 12. Boston before legislative committee at State House, with 8 old soldiers against me. This meeting was to consider the erection of a statue to General Butler, which Colonel Higginson opposed. Mar. 19. At Binghamton, N. Y. P. M. Lecture and had good audience of perhaps 250 in hard storm. June 28. Phi Beta Kappa. At meeting, gave notice of amendment next year in regard to women's admission to dinner. Two grandchildren came to cheer these later days, the first a boy named <
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