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Mabel Loomis Todd (search for this): chapter 16
XVI: the crowning years In 1889, Colonel Higginson began what proved to be a four years task of editing, with Mrs. Mabel Loomis Todd of Amherst, Emily Dickinson's poems and letters. Of this work he wrote Mrs. Todd:— I can't tell you how much I am enjoying the poems. There are many new to me which take my breath away.Mrs. Todd:— I can't tell you how much I am enjoying the poems. There are many new to me which take my breath away. A year later he wrote to her:— You are the only person who can feel as I do about this extraordinary thing we have done in recording this rare genius. I feel as if we had climbed to a cloud, pulled it away, and revealed a new star behind it . . . . Such things as I find in her letters! The Madonnas I see are those that paswill not only yield the final news of Emily Dickinson, but take from me a living companionship I shall miss. After the volume of letters was published, of which Mrs. Todd was the principal editor, Colonel Higginson wrote to her November 29, 1894:— Emily has arrived. They sent her to Sever's book store where I rarely go and
Thomas Wentworth Higginson (search for this): chapter 16
the door opened, and in stepped Colonel Thomas Wentworth Higginson. I shall never forget his appeaspect which is its due . . . . Since I saw Mr. Higginson cast his vote, I have never failed to takef my hat when casting mine. In 1892, Colonel Higginson's devoted sister Anna died, and he wrote an oration will be delivered by Colonel Thomas Wentworth Higginson. The author's seventieth birtymns—an entire surprise and delight. Colonel Higginson's own physician was confident of his rec a similar meeting in Worcester at which Colonel Higginson presided, this extract is taken:— e monument Jan. 25, 1902. Several of Colonel Higginson's poems were set to music, Sixty and Sixund her well To Lionel. In 1899-1900 Colonel Higginson gave a course of lectures before the Lowicon. You have earned a fair repose, Thomas Wentworth Higginson! This poem Colonel Higginson called Colonel Higginson called one of the greatest laurels I ever won. He thus alluded in his diary to the celebration:— Dec. [2 more...
Jan. 5, 1903. The lecture was considered a great success. All standing room occupied and almost everybody stayed through. I found reading to be far easier than speaking without notes (as I have done so long) and almost as effective; it seemed like beginning a new career and my voice served me well. Of the third course, in 1905, he wrote:— Feb. 28. First Lowell lecture (Wordsworth-shire). A great success—an unexpectedly fine voice. March 7. Second Lowell lecture. Carlyle, Ruskin, Froude, Hunt. March 28. Fifth Lowell lecture. Dickens, Thackeray and reading Tennyson's poems. April 4. Last Lowell lecture. Considered very successful and was pronounced by John Lowell the best he ever heard in that hall. In May, 1903, he spoke at the Concord Emerson celebration:— Meeting good and my address successful. After it, Senator Hoar turned to me and said, grasping my hand, What I have to say is pewter and tinsel compared to that. His position as chairma<
ections of Margaret Fuller Ossoli's and Emily Dickinson's letters. December 1st he recorded, My office of Military and Naval Historian expired, much to my satisfaction, after seven years and four months. An extension of a year's time without compensation was however granted at Colonel Higginson's request, and the History was satisfactorily completed. These fragments from the diary after his recovery show the continued activity:— Oct. 20, 1897. Evening presided at Anthony Hope Hawkins's reading. Had him here afterwards. Feb. 12, 1898. Springfield. Spoke at Lincoln dinner after half hour's reception to 100 men. March 9. Spent morning at State House—outrageous bill against Sunday Concerts. May 31, 1900. Evening, Boer meeting and presided. Got through well, though voice not strong. The three Boer envoys unusually fine looking men. This was a meeting at Faneuil Hall where envoys from the Boer Republic presented their side of the South African trouble wit
he had named, many years before, the youth with the radiant brow. The escort to the church was furnished by the Thomas Wentworth Higginson Post. The Loyal Legion conducted the military part of the service and the casket was borne up the aisle, to the sound of muffled drums, by young Negro soldiers. His verses, Waiting for the Bugle, and his hymn, To Thine Eternal Arms, O God, were sung, the large gathering of friends, which included all classes of the community, joining in the latter. Aldrich's Monody on the Death of Wendell Phillips, beginning,— One by one they go Into the unknown dark, was read, this being a poem for which Colonel Higginson had deeply cared. His ashes were deposited in the Cambridge Cemetery by the side of the little grave where he had strewn flowers on Decoration Day for thirty years. Of this spot, overlooking the Charles River Valley and commanding a view of the city of his birth, he had written:— Shadows come and shadows go O'er the meadows wide; Twic
William Makepeace Thackeray (search for this): chapter 16
ing room occupied and almost everybody stayed through. I found reading to be far easier than speaking without notes (as I have done so long) and almost as effective; it seemed like beginning a new career and my voice served me well. Of the third course, in 1905, he wrote:— Feb. 28. First Lowell lecture (Wordsworth-shire). A great success—an unexpectedly fine voice. March 7. Second Lowell lecture. Carlyle, Ruskin, Froude, Hunt. March 28. Fifth Lowell lecture. Dickens, Thackeray and reading Tennyson's poems. April 4. Last Lowell lecture. Considered very successful and was pronounced by John Lowell the best he ever heard in that hall. In May, 1903, he spoke at the Concord Emerson celebration:— Meeting good and my address successful. After it, Senator Hoar turned to me and said, grasping my hand, What I have to say is pewter and tinsel compared to that. His position as chairman of the Harvard Visiting Committee on English Literature he resigned i<
Bress Lord (search for this): chapter 16
t and his cheeks looked as if he had puffed so much at the bugle that they were all round and swelled and he could not get them back again. When we went away from Baltimore to Gettysburg there was a great good-natured old woman, jet black, who bade us all good-bye at the station. She had a large round face and no teeth and a common towel, very clean, pinned round her head and under her chin; and when we came back there she was, all ready to receive us, and saying, Got back all safe? Bress de Lord! And when we got into our carriages again, a lot of little black boys and girls ran along beside us, shouting whenever the bugler played. After this visit he noted in the journal: Began anew on history with fresh interest for visiting localities. The summer of 1890 was spent in Dublin, New Hampshire, which became henceforth a permanent summer home. The little daughter wrote her aunt in Brattleboro:— Papa wishes you to know that the castle in the air has a place on earth. He h
Y. P. M. Lecture (search for this): chapter 16
se than any of those who criticized him. The 1906 diary records:— Feb. 12. Evening at North End school—very turbulent—Italian boys, but I enjoyed talking to them, until I read from Army Life which was a mistake. Never read before children. Mar. 12. Boston before legislative committee at State House, with 8 old soldiers against me. This meeting was to consider the erection of a statue to General Butler, which Colonel Higginson opposed. Mar. 19. At Binghamton, N. Y. P. M. Lecture and had good audience of perhaps 250 in hard storm. June 28. Phi Beta Kappa. At meeting, gave notice of amendment next year in regard to women's admission to dinner. Two grandchildren came to cheer these later days, the first a boy named Wentworth born in 1906, of whom he wrote:— The beautiful and happy baby makes my health or illness a secondary trifle—if I can only pass quietly away without those melancholy intermediate days or weeks when I may be only a burden. An
Henry Copley Greene (search for this): chapter 16
secretary only writing his correspondence. He often leaves off anything in the middle and begins on something else and goes back to it. He has always worked in this way and likes it. In our early years at Dublin, the Smiths' outdoor theatre was dedicated and Colonel Higginson read these lines. They are given as a specimen of his gift at impromptu verse, which was often in demand on such occasions. Later he himself took part in a miracle play, Theophile, written by our neighbor, Henry Copley Greene, for the Teatro Bambino, in which Higginson personated an aged abbot. When the Goddess of Dulness would rule o'er this planet And bind all amusements, like Samson, with withes, Fate conquered her scheme, ere she fairly began it, By producing one household—a household of Smiths. Fate selected the seed of a Rhode Island Quaker Its wit and its wisdom, its mirth and its pith, And brought all these gifts to a Point—one half acre— And gave to the product the surname of Smith. Though C<
Benjamin Butler (search for this): chapter 16
rmon, but in such cases it always happened that he had remembered more of the discourse than any of those who criticized him. The 1906 diary records:— Feb. 12. Evening at North End school—very turbulent—Italian boys, but I enjoyed talking to them, until I read from Army Life which was a mistake. Never read before children. Mar. 12. Boston before legislative committee at State House, with 8 old soldiers against me. This meeting was to consider the erection of a statue to General Butler, which Colonel Higginson opposed. Mar. 19. At Binghamton, N. Y. P. M. Lecture and had good audience of perhaps 250 in hard storm. June 28. Phi Beta Kappa. At meeting, gave notice of amendment next year in regard to women's admission to dinner. Two grandchildren came to cheer these later days, the first a boy named Wentworth born in 1906, of whom he wrote:— The beautiful and happy baby makes my health or illness a secondary trifle—if I can only pass quietly awa
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