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Samuel M. Crothers (search for this): chapter 16
his windows, his visible presence was quietly withdrawn. The farewell service was held by his own wish in the First Parish Church in Cambridge which claimed his allegiance from early association and from his warm regard for the pastor, Dr. Samuel M. Crothers, whom he had named, many years before, the youth with the radiant brow. The escort to the church was furnished by the Thomas Wentworth Higginson Post. The Loyal Legion conducted the military part of the service and the casket was bornhe had written:— Shadows come and shadows go O'er the meadows wide; Twice each day, to and fro, Steals the river-tide; Each morn with sunrise-glow Gilds the green hillside. On the bright May morning of 1911, when we stood there sorrowing, Dr. Crothers recalled a thought which had come to him in the church when he heard the bugle sounding Taps and the distant response. I thought, he said, of the passing of Mr. Valiant-for-truth in Pilgrim's Progress. So he passed over, and all the trumpet
Julia Ward Howe (search for this): chapter 16
. To Concord, Mass., to funeral of Judge Keyes [a classmate]. This excursion to Concord was violently opposed by his family, for he was obliged to go alone, his natural guardian being absent; but he was inexorable; delighted to escape from feminine control; and came back triumphant. May 26. At the notice of an hour or so prepared a talk on Theo. Parker for F. R.A. May 27. To Boston for lunch of Free Religious Association at which I spoke for the last time. Afterwards at Mrs. Howe's birthday reception. May 30. [Decoration Day.] To exercises in morning, marched with G. A.R. to chapel. June 10, 1910. Closing the care and labor of nearly two years [Genealogy]—my last literary work properly so called. I am now the sixth on the list of Harvard graduates. One of the reforms which interested Colonel Higginson in later years was Simplified Spelling. It must be confessed that he did not attempt to remodel his own way of writing, but he defined the movement
Edward Bellamy (search for this): chapter 16
lege Association was because 1 thought it very undesirable that colleges should ignore the very word as they almost uniformly did then; Harvard being almost the only one which allowed it even to be mentioned. . . . As for the name Socialist, I never either claimed or disclaimed it, regarding it as merely a feeler in the right direction and refusing any prominent place in the movement. I remember that Dr. Edward Hale and I both took this same position in a similar organization formed by Edward Bellamy in his time. His social creed, as stated in a letter dated 1859, would have equally fitted the succeeding years:— Every year makes me, at least, more democratic, with less reverence for the elect and more faith in the many. During the winter of 1911, strength gradually failed, though interest in the affairs of life never flagged. In February, he read a paper on Dickens, with all his old spirit, before the Round Table, and in April, he attended a meeting of the Authors' Club in
Edward Everett Hale (search for this): chapter 16
ly translated and published in London. Of course it gratified me, even if sometimes overstated and undeserved, gratified more than such pleasant personal tributes as those of Justin McCarthy, Tom Hughes, and others in their books of reminiscences. In February of the same year, he writes:— It was curious after my seven months absence [in Europe] when I wrote nothing for print, to come back and find the same continuous impulse of hard work in my study. April 3, 1902. Evening. E. E. Hale Festival— a fine meeting, thoroughly worked up and in a good cause; but I should not wish to have any injudicious friends try the same thing for me, even on a smaller scale, for my birthday. Such occasions are carnivals of flattery, no discrimination, no one venturing to say the exact truth. Should it ever be attempted for me, I wish to be painted as I am. Aug. 4. Early this morning I read over some of the opening chapters of my Cheerful Yesterdays, and it seemed like another world
Wentworth Higginson (search for this): chapter 16
XVI: the crowning years In 1889, Colonel Higginson began what proved to be a four years task of editing, with Mrs. Mabel Loomis Todd of Amherst, Emily Dickinson's poems and letters. Of this work he wrote Mrs. Todd:— I can't tell you how much I am enjoying the poems. There are many new to me which take my breath away. mily Dickinson, but take from me a living companionship I shall miss. After the volume of letters was published, of which Mrs. Todd was the principal editor, Colonel Higginson wrote to her November 29, 1894:— Emily has arrived. They sent her to Sever's book store where I rarely go and where she might have hid forever in a cudoor or under the piano cover? Well! what an encyclopaedia of strange gifts she was. During these years of fascinating though strenuous editorial labor, Colonel Higginson was also engaged on various pieces of original work. He wrote in July, 1890:— I am now to correct proof of three books– Epictetus, American Sonnets a
Theodore Parker (search for this): chapter 16
Fuller Ossoli, 100th birthday. It was held in the house of my birth, the parlors crowded. Perhaps it was my last public meeting. May 17. To Concord, Mass., to funeral of Judge Keyes [a classmate]. This excursion to Concord was violently opposed by his family, for he was obliged to go alone, his natural guardian being absent; but he was inexorable; delighted to escape from feminine control; and came back triumphant. May 26. At the notice of an hour or so prepared a talk on Theo. Parker for F. R.A. May 27. To Boston for lunch of Free Religious Association at which I spoke for the last time. Afterwards at Mrs. Howe's birthday reception. May 30. [Decoration Day.] To exercises in morning, marched with G. A.R. to chapel. June 10, 1910. Closing the care and labor of nearly two years [Genealogy]—my last literary work properly so called. I am now the sixth on the list of Harvard graduates. One of the reforms which interested Colonel Higginson in later
Goodman Hart (search for this): chapter 16
ognition of genuine manhood and womanhood in the townsfolk and his detection of a poetic element in even the grim and seemingly sordid side of country life. Literary work was continued at Dublin and the author's secretary imported for a time each summer, as this plea to his so-called pastor for the loan of a typewriter shows:— Reverend Sir:— A virtuous maid has arrived at this house, for whose spiritual welfare I am bound to concern myself. She is to do certain copying for Goodman Hart and myself on that carnal instrument called a typewriter, which I myself eschew, finding it to savor little of the great Scriptural Types which we are bidden to revere. Now the only typewriting machine yet accessible here is that belonging to your neighbor Goodman Cooke, a species of lay preacher, who offers his for the afternoon. Yet I ask myself, Is it meet that this maid, soberly nurtured . . . should perform the office of writing on a Unitarian typewriter and that only? Should s
Thomas Carlyle (search for this): chapter 16
seemed like beginning a new career and my voice served me well. Of the third course, in 1905, he wrote:— Feb. 28. First Lowell lecture (Wordsworth-shire). A great success—an unexpectedly fine voice. March 7. Second Lowell lecture. Carlyle, Ruskin, Froude, Hunt. March 28. Fifth Lowell lecture. Dickens, Thackeray and reading Tennyson's poems. April 4. Last Lowell lecture. Considered very successful and was pronounced by John Lowell the best he ever heard in that hall.d also the wonderful and quite unique creation . . . of Miss Grandison. In 1908 and 1909, short newspaper and magazine articles kept him busy, and he began a record of the Higginson family. In the latter year the collection of papers called Carlyle's Laugh was published. Perhaps, he wrote, my last book, when nearly eighty-six. In 1910, he finished the editorship of the Higginson Genealogy, revised his Young Folks' History, and noted, May 13, Work almost at an end, perhaps for life. Sti
Thomas Ewart Higginson (search for this): chapter 16
the forest . . . . S .. . calls me Thomas Ewart Higginson from my devotion to the Gladstonian axmiths' outdoor theatre was dedicated and Colonel Higginson read these lines. They are given as a sley Greene, for the Teatro Bambino, in which Higginson personated an aged abbot. When the Goddess still the scene of annual town picnics, Colonel Higginson took a cordial part in those festivitieuths, now a college professor, writes of Colonel Higginson:— The traits that marked his summection of being Harvard's oldest graduate Colonel Higginson whimsically coveted. He wrote to his silife? The students were often sent to Colonel Higginson by their instructors to glean informatiofforts and mine should fail. For in 1898 Colonel Higginson was given by Harvard the degree of Ll.D.ing to have lived for. The secret of Colonel Higginson's popularity was the overflowing fountai, he was startled to receive a call from Colonel Higginson with an invitation to attend an interest
Goodman Cooke (search for this): chapter 16
his so-called pastor for the loan of a typewriter shows:— Reverend Sir:— A virtuous maid has arrived at this house, for whose spiritual welfare I am bound to concern myself. She is to do certain copying for Goodman Hart and myself on that carnal instrument called a typewriter, which I myself eschew, finding it to savor little of the great Scriptural Types which we are bidden to revere. Now the only typewriting machine yet accessible here is that belonging to your neighbor Goodman Cooke, a species of lay preacher, who offers his for the afternoon. Yet I ask myself, Is it meet that this maid, soberly nurtured . . . should perform the office of writing on a Unitarian typewriter and that only? Should she not be kept in the right path, during each morning, by a typewriter of sounder views —your own perchance? Pray consider, perpend and reply. Your faithful Parishioner. Written at the breakfast table—hence spots. But what are these, besides spots on the Faith?
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