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Wendell Phillips (search for this): chapter 16
youth with the radiant brow. The escort to the church was furnished by the Thomas Wentworth Higginson Post. The Loyal Legion conducted the military part of the service and the casket was borne up the aisle, to the sound of muffled drums, by young Negro soldiers. His verses, Waiting for the Bugle, and his hymn, To Thine Eternal Arms, O God, were sung, the large gathering of friends, which included all classes of the community, joining in the latter. Aldrich's Monody on the Death of Wendell Phillips, beginning,— One by one they go Into the unknown dark, was read, this being a poem for which Colonel Higginson had deeply cared. His ashes were deposited in the Cambridge Cemetery by the side of the little grave where he had strewn flowers on Decoration Day for thirty years. Of this spot, overlooking the Charles River Valley and commanding a view of the city of his birth, he had written:— Shadows come and shadows go O'er the meadows wide; Twice each day, to and fro, Steals the riv
0, Felt as I strolled about after breakfast that I should be willing to go to sleep for the winter and wake up to find myself here [Dublin] again. There is still woodchopping to be done and I hate to leave it. Of our neighbors the Abbot Thayers, he said they live outdoors, know all birds and butterflies, and rear the latter from the chrysalis till they flutter in and out of the great sitting-room as if it were their home. One summer we had Mark Twain for a neighbor:— Called on Clemens. Found him in bed where he prefers to write, a strange picturesque object, in night clothes, with curly white hair standing up over his head. The bed was covered with written sheets which his daughter carried off at intervals, to be copied by her on typewriter, his secretary only writing his correspondence. He often leaves off anything in the middle and begins on something else and goes back to it. He has always worked in this way and likes it. In our early years at Dublin, the Smit
Emily Dickinson (search for this): chapter 16
889, Colonel Higginson began what proved to be a four years task of editing, with Mrs. Mabel Loomis Todd of Amherst, Emily Dickinson's poems and letters. Of this work he wrote Mrs. Todd:— I can't tell you how much I am enjoying the poems. Thto hear that the book is so nearly ready; it will be the last, I suppose, and will not only yield the final news of Emily Dickinson, but take from me a living companionship I shall miss. After the volume of letters was published, of which Mrs. Toddinal work. He wrote in July, 1890:— I am now to correct proof of three books– Epictetus, American Sonnets and Emily Dickinson's poems. And in November:— I was about writing the determination never again to have three books on hand at sah and concerning John Brown was given to the Boston Public Library; also collections of Margaret Fuller Ossoli's and Emily Dickinson's letters. December 1st he recorded, My office of Military and Naval Historian expired, much to my satisfaction,
George Higginson (search for this): chapter 16
for one who was in any way criticized —a trait that his impetuous young daughter sometimes found trying. People who were almost strangers unburdened their souls to him as to a father confessor. As he once said, It is my fortune or misfortune to have one of those temperaments which have since early youth drawn unexpected and sometimes perilous confidences from others. Applicants for assistance were never turned away, even if by helping them pecuniarily he inconvenienced himself. Mr. George Higginson (father of Henry Lee Higginson) once gave his cousin Wentworth an illustration of this family trait. Hailing an imaginary passer-by, he cried, Do you want anything?—at the same time thrusting his hand into his pocket and bringing it out full of silver. Here, take this! So long as the silver lasted this form of philanthropy came easily; but the most injurious of the daily visitors were those who robbed the busy author of precious time. Expressing one day some doubt about the advant
George Frisbie Hoar (search for this): chapter 16
Lowell lecture (Wordsworth-shire). A great success—an unexpectedly fine voice. March 7. Second Lowell lecture. Carlyle, Ruskin, Froude, Hunt. March 28. Fifth Lowell lecture. Dickens, Thackeray and reading Tennyson's poems. April 4. Last Lowell lecture. Considered very successful and was pronounced by John Lowell the best he ever heard in that hall. In May, 1903, he spoke at the Concord Emerson celebration:— Meeting good and my address successful. After it, Senator Hoar turned to me and said, grasping my hand, What I have to say is pewter and tinsel compared to that. His position as chairman of the Harvard Visiting Committee on English Literature he resigned in 1903, having served on this and other Visiting Committees for sixty-odd years. In the latter part of that year he wrote in the journal, I always keep on my desk Sunset and evening Star [Tennyson's Crossing the Bar ], and am ready for whatever comes. On the eve of his eightieth birthday, in 1
not aware that you saved my life. What a unique existence was hers! Four years later, he wrote:— I feel half sorry to hear that the book is so nearly ready; it will be the last, I suppose, and will not only yield the final news of Emily Dickinson, but take from me a living companionship I shall miss. After the volume of letters was published, of which Mrs. Todd was the principal editor, Colonel Higginson wrote to her November 29, 1894:— Emily has arrived. They sent her to Sever's book store where I rarely go and where she might have hid forever in a cupboard . . . . It is extraordinary how the mystic and bizarre Emily is born at once between two pages . . . as Thoreau says summer passes to autumn in an instant. All after that is the E. D. I knew. But how is it possible to reconcile her accounts of early book reading . . . with the yarns (O! irreverence) she told me about their first books, concealed from her father in the great bush at the door or under the piano
Charles Dickens (search for this): chapter 16
third course, in 1905, he wrote:— Feb. 28. First Lowell lecture (Wordsworth-shire). A great success—an unexpectedly fine voice. March 7. Second Lowell lecture. Carlyle, Ruskin, Froude, Hunt. March 28. Fifth Lowell lecture. Dickens, Thackeray and reading Tennyson's poems. April 4. Last Lowell lecture. Considered very successful and was pronounced by John Lowell the best he ever heard in that hall. In May, 1903, he spoke at the Concord Emerson celebration:— r makes me, at least, more democratic, with less reverence for the elect and more faith in the many. During the winter of 1911, strength gradually failed, though interest in the affairs of life never flagged. In February, he read a paper on Dickens, with all his old spirit, before the Round Table, and in April, he attended a meeting of the Authors' Club in Milton. His last thoughts and directions were for others, and his last days painless and serene. On the evening of May 9, while soft <
Joseph Lindon (search for this): chapter 16
piness. It was enough simply to live and look round on the trees I love. Her father always bore an active part in Margaret's birthday celebrations, whether they took the form of climbing the mountain, perhaps getting drenched in the mountain brook on the way, or a picnic in the woods. Later, on her seventeenth birthday, he joined in the Virginia Reel. About an earlier celebration, he wrote to his sister that the children played and swung and then came the two young Smiths [Joseph Lindon and his brother] clad in brilliant Japanese costumes who made great fun as they always do. We had tea on a large flat boulder above the road shaded by pines, and this was very merry . . . . It is very pretty to see her and Rob [an Irish setter] dancing about together with the butterflies. The birds come quite near her and do not seem afraid, and sometimes, when she whistles to them, they answer her from the forest . . . . S .. . calls me Thomas Ewart Higginson from my devotion t
d sang on the stairs, Marching throa Georgia! They took me by entire surprise; also bringing flowers. May 4, 1900. To meeting of officers at American House. Drove in alone. Was treated with curious deferential attention and made a speech. May 12. Pleasant and successful memorial meeting for Margaret Fuller Ossoli, 100th birthday. It was held in the house of my birth, the parlors crowded. Perhaps it was my last public meeting. May 17. To Concord, Mass., to funeral of Judge Keyes [a classmate]. This excursion to Concord was violently opposed by his family, for he was obliged to go alone, his natural guardian being absent; but he was inexorable; delighted to escape from feminine control; and came back triumphant. May 26. At the notice of an hour or so prepared a talk on Theo. Parker for F. R.A. May 27. To Boston for lunch of Free Religious Association at which I spoke for the last time. Afterwards at Mrs. Howe's birthday reception. May 30. [D
Batchelder (search for this): chapter 16
him, he said, I am naturally a glutton of such work and rather enjoy it. In the spring of that year he visited the battlefield of Gettysburg in connection with his Military History and wrote home:— At Gettysburg I rose at 6 A. M. and soon after seven set off with fifty people and two buglers in a series of omnibuses and barouches to drive about, over twenty miles of Union and Confederate lines of battle. At certain places we stopped, were called together by the buglers while Colonel Batchelder who is a sort of professor of Gettysburg battle knowledge told us just what happened, and as we had with us a number of persons who had been in the battle at different points, they often added their reminiscences. One of these was a western physician who had lost his hearing in the battle by the noise of cannon and whenever we stopped and gathered round the speaker, he would run up to the front and stick his long ear trumpet up to Colonel B. and drink it all in with beaming eyes . . .
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