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New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ill, I will do what I can. Sometimes I have thought that hitherto, amid the fierce this-worldliness of N. E., nothing New England. but superstition would keep [the people] (in their present low state) from perverting the Sunday yet worse by making of the Rev. Justin Edwards, D. D., of Andover, for a year past, to enforce Sabbatarianism, he proposed a Lib. 14.110. New England Convention to discuss the Sabbath. Occurrences meanwhile, on both sides of the Atlantic, had made such a meeting seemlley-slaves row with what intent they would, he guided all things at his will. Lib. 18.53. For example, the Prince of New England infidelity, as the same paper styled him, successfully opposed such of Mr. Parker's resolutions as deprecated a Lib. ey to Lib. 18.50; Ms. Jan. 10, 1848, W. L. G. to E. M. Davis. support the operations of a Sabbath League. At home, a New England pro-slavery Sabbatarian press recoiled from the spectacle of the Rev. John G. Palfrey, a Massachusetts Representative
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
laws and constitutions is precisely equivalent to damming up the Mississippi with bulrushes, and that the man who expects anything but failure from such a plan has still the a b c of his country's history to learn. Lib. 18.18. To this Proviso the four hundred delegates who met at Columbus Lib. 18.103. pledged their votes and their concerted action, and ended by calling another convention at Buffalo, N. Y., on August 9. Meanwhile, a great mass convention on the same lines was held at Worcester, Mass., on June 28, under the Lib. 18.106. presidency of Samuel Hoar and leadership of Stephen C. Phillips and Charles Francis Adams, and with the assistance of Joshua R. Giddings; and in other parts of the State, as Mr. Garrison's letters have just shown, the agitation was carried on during the month of July. The Conscience Whigs of Massachusetts were in revolt Lib. 18.94, 98, 102. against the action of their party at Philadelphia on June 7, when the popular hero of the Mexican War, Gen. Z
New Ipswich, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
d not seen for a long time, and the pleasure at meeting was mutual. There is to be a Free Soil Convention in this town next week; and to-morrow Mr. Child begins a short tour through the county, for the purpose of addressing the people, and urging upon them the importance of sending delegates to the meeting. Bro. George drove down to the depot a G. W. Benson. few minutes after my arrival, and carried me and my baggage, with Mr. Child and Mrs. Hammond Eliza P. Hammond, formerly of New Ipswich, N. H., where her husband, an amateur portrait painter, had had Mr. Garrison for a sitter in January, 1844. (whom we took up by the way), to Bensonville. On the way, we discussed the affairs of the nation as vigorously and actively as possible. Speaking of Mrs. Chapman's visit to Europe, for educational purposes in regard to her children, Mr. Child expressed much surprise and wonder at her choice, and said that he had supposed there was not steam power enough to drag her away from the anti-
Dedham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
y, and resumes work with ardor. His new Sabbath Call is finely drawn up, I think. I did not sign it, though agreeing with its principles; mainly because I feel no such necessity for a specific movement against the Sabbath as he and H. C. W. do. The popular mind seems to me Henry C. Wright. clearing itself up fast enough for all practical purposes: these theological reforms have but a secondary interest for me. Quincy, too, was antipathetic. Edmund Quincy to R. D. Webb, in Dublin. Dedham, March 9, 1848. Ms. The letter to Patrick Keogh I did my best to get to him. But as no such person was to be found at the address, and after having been sent on fool's errands into various parts of the town by your finest pisantry on earth, I had to give it up, and was about consigning it to the all-swallowing, indiscriminate orifice of the common post, as the divine Charles Lamb says (whose name you blasphemously take in vain by Cf. Whittier's Prose Works, 2.216. mentioning it in the s
Franklin (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
b. 18: 182). I long to see the day when the great issue with the Slave Power, of the immediate dissolution of the Union, will be made by all the free States, for then the conflict will be a short and decisive one, and liberty will triumph. The Free Soil movement inevitably leads to it, and hence I hail it as the beginning of the end. The new movement had had a somewhat rapid development. From Cincinnati, in May, had issued a call for a Lib. 18.82. People's Convention to be held at Columbus, Ohio, on June 21, to form a party based on opposition to slavery extension. Whigs, Democrats, and Liberty Party men mingled in the three thousand signers to the call. Mr. Garrison did not see in this combination and its object the moral display which its promoters alleged. Our gratification, he said, at this movement is found Lib. 18.82. only in the evidence that it gives, that the anti-slavery agitation is spreading among all classes at the North. As for the issue that is presen
Northampton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
hers'—prescribed Lib. 18.110; Ms. May 3, 1848, W. L. G. to E. Pease. for him the water-cure. At Bensonville, near Northampton, Mass., the seat of the lately defunct Community of which George W. Benson had been a leading spirit, Ante, pp. 81, 83. aith others to defray Garrison's personal expenses and lighten his domestic burden. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Northampton, July 18, 1848. Ms. The trip in the cars to this place, yesterday, was much more pleasant than the one I took with W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Bensonville, July 26, 1848. Ms. To-day there is to be a Free Soil Convention in Northampton, and several of us will go down this afternoon to judge of its character and spirit—dispensing with our usual bath. Ter could but excite the distrust of the abolition chiefs. Mr. Garrison wrote privately in August to Mr. Quincy from Northampton: As for the Free Soil movement, I feel that great care is Lib. 18.134. demanded of us Disunionists, both in the
Buffalo, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
roviso receives the sanction of Congress or not, feeling that the attempt to restrain slavery by laws and constitutions is precisely equivalent to damming up the Mississippi with bulrushes, and that the man who expects anything but failure from such a plan has still the a b c of his country's history to learn. Lib. 18.18. To this Proviso the four hundred delegates who met at Columbus Lib. 18.103. pledged their votes and their concerted action, and ended by calling another convention at Buffalo, N. Y., on August 9. Meanwhile, a great mass convention on the same lines was held at Worcester, Mass., on June 28, under the Lib. 18.106. presidency of Samuel Hoar and leadership of Stephen C. Phillips and Charles Francis Adams, and with the assistance of Joshua R. Giddings; and in other parts of the State, as Mr. Garrison's letters have just shown, the agitation was carried on during the month of July. The Conscience Whigs of Massachusetts were in revolt Lib. 18.94, 98, 102. against the a
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ot the object they sought to accomplish, that so greatly excited the country, especially the Southern portion of it; and so, to set them a good example—to show them how easily they might propitiate the slaveholders while pleading for the emancipation of their slaves—he wrote his work on Ante, 1.439, 466; 2.54, etc. slavery, the circulation of which was deemed incendiary at the South, and the publication of which caused Gen. Waddy Cf. ante, 1.466, 467; 2.57; and Lib. 23.154. Thompson of South Carolina to exclaim, on the floor of Congress, that Dr. Channing was playing second fiddle to Garrison and Thompson. This was an instructive experiment to Geo. Thompson. the Doctor, and he did not fail to profit by it. In 1853, having occasion to review the incident of his meeting with Dr. Channing at the State House (ante, 2: 96), Mr. Garrison wrote (Lib. 23: 154): When Dr. Channing took me by the hand, it was only an act of ordinary civility on his part, as he did not catch my name, and di
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
he Sabbath was exclusively a Jewish institution,—a shadow of good things to come, which vanished eighteen hundred years ago before the light of the Christian dispensation, and therefore that it constitutes no part of Christianity,—there is no exemption from the penalty of the law; but, should they venture to labor even for bread on that day, or be guilty of what is called Sabbath desecration, they are liable either to fine or imprisonment! Cases of this kind have occurred in Massachusetts, Vermont, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, within a comparatively short period, where conscientious and upright persons have been thrust into prison for an act no more intrinsically heinous than that of gathering in a crop of hay, or selling moral or philanthropic publications. Allusion is here made to the case of Charles C. Burleigh, who in February, 1847, was twice put in jail in West Chester, Pa. (the second time for six days), for selling anti-slavery books on Sunday (Lib. 17.54, 59; Penn. Freeman,
Atlantic Ocean (search for this): chapter 8
ay from the anti-slavery cause to the extent that her absence must necessarily require. With us, and many others, he regretted the step, and thought it an ill-advised one. To Mrs. Chapman herself Mr. Garrison wrote on the following day (Ms. July 19, 1848): How to feel resigned to your separation from our little antislavery band by a foreign residence of years, I scarcely know; but I know that the step has not been hastily taken on your part, and that there is not water enough in the Atlantic Ocean to quench the flame of your philanthropy. At home or abroad, you will be equally untiring to promote that sacred cause in which you have so long and so effectively labored. Still, we shall miss you more than words can express. We have few suggestive, creative, executive minds; and such is yours, in an eminent degree. Your absence, therefore, will not be the absence of one individual, but of many in one. How joyfully I testify to the clearness of your vision in the darkest hours! to
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