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Covent Garden (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 14
commons was on the globe, and yet what spaces separate them when we regard <*> eleven morals, character, and external appearances! thought that five<*> study of one great city teeming with life, animation, and gayety would take off the edge of my wonder, and throw over all other places that I may visit a secondary character. But here I am in famous London town, and my wonder still attends me; but it is of an entirely different quality from that 1 Established in 1831, in King Street, Covent Garden, for literary men, and particularly for those who were by profession or tastes specially interested in the drama. Its collection of pictures contain several painted by Sir Peter Lely, Gainsborough, and Reynolds. The club was frequented by Theodore Hook and Albert Smith. June, during the discussion of the Irish Municipal Corporation Bill; and there I sat from six o'clock till the cry of divide drove me out at twelve. Hansard's Parliamentary Debates, Third Series, Vol. XL. pp. 617-
Tivoli (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ians; perhaps I may say the same of literary men. I have already written you some hasty lines on some of the wits I meet at clubs. There are others and worthier that I have met under other circumstances. There is Walter Savage Landor. 1775-1864. In 1856, Mr. Hillard edited Selections from Landor's writings. I know you admire his genius. I first met him at Mr. Kenyon's; John Kenyon, 1787-1856; the inheritor of a large fortune, and friend of many men of letters; the author of A Day at Tivoli, and other poems. He distributed his fortune among eighty legatees, among whom were Elizabeth and Robert Browning and Barry Cornwall. Several notes from Kenyon to Sumner are preserved; one from 4 Harley Place, of June 15, 1838, saying: You are hardly a stranger among us; you were hardly a stranger when you had been here only three days; another, inviting him to meet Southey; another inviting him to dine, Jan. 19, 1839; and another regretting a previous engagement of Sumner, and adding, I g
Limerick (Irish Republic) (search for this): chapter 14
arried, in 1839, a daughter of Lord Monteagle (Thomas Spring Rice). the author of Philip Van Artevelde, Babbage, Senior, Lord Lansdowne, Mrs. Lister, Mrs. Lister (Maria Theresa), a sister of Lord Clarendon, was first married to Thomas Henry Lister, who died in 1842. She married, in 1844, Sir George Cornewall Lewis, and died in 1865. She is the author of Lives of the Friends and Contemporaries of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Spring Rice's Thomas Spring Rice, 1790-1866. He represented Limerick in Parliament from 1820 to 1832, and Cambridge from 1832 to 1839; was Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department in 1827; Secretary of the Treasury from 1830 to 1834; Secretary of State for the Colonies in 1834; Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1835 to September, 1839, when he was appointed Comptroller-General of the Exchequer. He was made a peer, Sept. 5, 1839, with the title of Baron Monteagle. In Parliament he advocated liberal measures. He married for his second wife, in 1841, a
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 14
life and writings, which I have prepared to be laid before the Institute with an accompanying letter. Of course, I was very much cramped by writing in a foreign language; but yet I have contrived to say one or two things which, I hope, are as just in fact as they are appositely introduced. Writing in the country of Cujas and D'Aguesseau, I could not forbear making an allusion to those great minds. As ever, my affectionate recollections to all your family and to yourself. C. S. P. S. London teeming with interest will naturally form the subject of many letters. To George S. Hillard, Boston. Garrick Club, June 4, 1838. Zzz born of Paris. I have a sense of oppression as I walk these various streets, see the thronging thousands, catch the hum of business, and feel the plethora of life about me. The charm of antiquity, so subtle and commanding,—at least I confess to its power,—the charm of taste, and then the excitement produced by a constant consciousness that one is in
Surrey (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 14
-General. When I pressed Lushington into a comparison of Cottenham with Brougham, he evidently gave the former the preference. Lushington Stephen Lushington, 1782-1873. He served in Parliament from 1817 to 1841, advocated the abolition of slavery and the slave-trade; was one of Queen Caroline's counsel, and was appointed Judge of the Admiralty and a Privy Councillor in 1838. He was Lady Byron's counsel in her domestic difficulties. Sumner visited him in July, 1857, at Ockham Park, in Surrey. himself is a great man; one of the ablest men in England. I owe his acquaintance to the Attorney-General. Dr. L. told me that Brougham, when Chancellor, nearly killed himself and all his bar; that, during the passage of the Reform Bill in the Commons, he sat in the Lords from ten o'clock in the forenoon till ten at night; and Lushington was in constant attendance here, and was obliged to repair from the Lords to the Commons, where he was kept nearly all night. The consequence was that Lus
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ded into the quiet debate at Lincoln's Inn before the Chancellor; have passed to the Privy Council (the old Cockpit); have sat with my friend, Mr. Senior, Nassau William Senior, 1790-1864. He was appointed Master in Chancery, in 1836. His writings, on topics of Political Economy, are various; and he was for several years professor of that science at Oxford. Among his publications was one upon American Slavery, which reviewed Sumner's speech, of May 19 and 20, 1856, on The Crime against Kansas, and the personal assault which followed it, being a reprint with additions of his article in the Edinburgh Review, April, 1855, Vol. CI. pp. 293-331. In 1857 they met, both in Paris and afterwards in London, and enjoyed greatly each other's society. Mr. Senior invited Sumner to dine several times in 1838-39. as a Master in Chancery; with Mr. Justice Vaughan at Chambers in Serjeants' Inn; and lastly, yesterday, I sat at the Old Bailey. This last sitting, of course, is freshest in my mind;
Denmark (Denmark) (search for this): chapter 14
1; was made a peeress in her own right in 1836, with the title of Baroness Stratheden; and died in 1860. See reference to her being raised to the peerage in Life of Lord Denman, Vol. II. p. 27. She is beautiful, intelligent, and courteous. The Attorney-General has invited me to meet him at Edinburgh, when he goes down to present himself to his constituents. This morning, Lord Bexley Nicholas Vansittart, 1766-1851. He was chosen to Parliament in 1796; was in the foreign service at Denmark; Lord of the Treasury in Ireland; Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1812 to 1823; and then raised to the peerage as Baron Bexley. He was distinguished for his capacity in financial administration. He promoted religious and charitable enterprises with much zeal, and was President of the British and Foreign Bible Society. His card admitted Sumner to the gallery of the House of Lords, on July 16, 1838. In June he invited Sumner to attend a meeting of the Bible Society, at which he was to pr
Ripon, Fond Du Lac County, Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
remain even during divisions. I was present at a most interesting debate on the 20th June, on the affairs of Spain. The debate of Tuesday, June 19, 1838, in the House of Lords upon intervention in favor of Don Carlos, is reported in Hansard's Parliamentary Debates, Third Series, Vol. XLIII. pp. 806-867. The peers who spoke at length were the Marquis of Londonderry, Viscount Melbourne, Lord Lyndhurst, Earl of Carnarvon, Marquis of Lansdowne, and Duke of Wellington; the Earls of Minto and Ripon spoke briefly. I heard Lyndhurst; and I cannot hesitate to pronounce him a master orator. All my prejudices are against him; he is unprincipled as a politician, and as a man; and his legal reputation has sunk very much by the reversal of his judgment in the case of Small v. Attwood, Clark and Finnelly (House of Lords), Vol. VI. pp. 232-531. The Lords read their opinions on March 22, 1838. The case involved the right to rescind a contract on account of fraud. in which it is said Brough
Pump Court (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 14
ertaken to review your works, but has since gone to the Continent. And thus I have rambled over sheets of paper! Do you, my dear judge, follow me in all these wanderings? . . . Then think of my invading the quiet seclusion of the Temple; looking in upon my friends in King's Bench Walk; smiling with poetical reminiscences as I look at the No. 5 where Murray once lived; passing by Plowden Buildings, diving into the retirement of Elm Court to see Talfourd, or into the deeper retirement of Pump Court where is Wilkinson, or prematurely waking up my friend Brown from his morning slumbers, at two o'clock in the afternoon, in Crown-Office Row. You may gather from my letters that I have seen much of the profession, and also of others. Indeed, English lawyers have told me that there are many of their own bar who are not so well acquainted with it already as I am. And if I am able to visit all the circuits, as I intend, I think I shall have a knowledge and experience of the English bar su
Londonderry (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 14
s or Commons. In the former I have had a place always assigned me on the steps of the throne, in the very body of the house, where I remain even during divisions. I was present at a most interesting debate on the 20th June, on the affairs of Spain. The debate of Tuesday, June 19, 1838, in the House of Lords upon intervention in favor of Don Carlos, is reported in Hansard's Parliamentary Debates, Third Series, Vol. XLIII. pp. 806-867. The peers who spoke at length were the Marquis of Londonderry, Viscount Melbourne, Lord Lyndhurst, Earl of Carnarvon, Marquis of Lansdowne, and Duke of Wellington; the Earls of Minto and Ripon spoke briefly. I heard Lyndhurst; and I cannot hesitate to pronounce him a master orator. All my prejudices are against him; he is unprincipled as a politician, and as a man; and his legal reputation has sunk very much by the reversal of his judgment in the case of Small v. Attwood, Clark and Finnelly (House of Lords), Vol. VI. pp. 232-531. The Lords rea
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