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Milan, Sullivan County, Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. Leaving Milan Oct. 6, Sumner reached Santa Maria at midnight, bade farewell to Italy the next morning at sunrise, as he stood on the frontier line, and reached Innsbruck on the morning of the ninth. After a week at Munich, he went to Passau, thence in a small boillard. Munich, Oct. 18, 1839. dear Hillard,—The day after I wrote you from Venice I inscribed my name for a place in the malle-postefor that evening as far as Milan. We started at eight o'clock; it poured down cataracts: my companions, a countess, and an honest father with his son, a boy of fourteen, going to a school in Switght, stopping one half-hour only for dinner. We passed through Padua, Verona, Brescia, Bergamo; and at nine o'clock on the morning after the second night, entered Milan. This is a great place for encountering friends, it is such a thoroughfare. I had just entered the room which contains Leonardo's Last Supper,—a painting truly
Romrod (Hesse, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
ne where they were ground and sharpened, then to the assembling room where the students were drinking and smoking, then to the contest, where the combatants were attended by a doctor who very coolly smoked all the while, and surrounded by students with pipes in their mouths. A student this week has lost his nose; it being cut off at one blow. It has since been sewed on; but he has brushed it off twice in the night. It was from this neighborhood that Dr. Follen, Dr. Follen was born in Romrod, Hesse-Darmstadt. or as he is here called Dr Follenius, came; and his death is sincerely lamented by all the Germans with whom I have spoken. At a large supper-party last night, of professors and doctors, I communicated it. To Judge Story. Heidelberg, Feb. 10, 1840. my dear Judge,— . . . You dispose of my views about raising the standard of education in Harvard College summarily enough. Would that I had your influence on that question! The age, our national character, our future d
Heidelberg (Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
of Leipsic, Weimar, Gotha, and Frankfort to Heidelberg, where he remained five weeks, enjoying the Karl Mittermaier, a physician, now living in Heidelberg, was another of Professor Mittermaier's sonsIreland. I leave Berlin in a few days for Heidelberg, whence I shall go down the Rhine to Cologneto Leipsic, to Weimar, Gotha, Frankfort, and Heidelberg; for a day and night was shut up in the carors, I communicated it. To Judge Story. Heidelberg, Feb. 10, 1840. my dear Judge,— . . . YouI cannot afford a horse as of old. I have in Heidelberg one hundred dollars, and I doubt not I am thd for many years represented the district of Heidelberg in the Diet of Baden, meeting at Carlsruhe. to have been translated by Dr. Johannsen, of Heidelberg, but he has died; so that project has failed. To George S. Hillard. Heidelberg, Feb. 26, 1840. dear Hillard,—Still at Heidelberg. I trussic, Gotha, and the Ducal Palace; Frankfort, Heidelberg, where I am now enjoying the simplicity of G[11 more...]<
Innsbruck (Tyrol, Austria) (search for this): chapter 16
ta Maria at midnight, bade farewell to Italy the next morning at sunrise, as he stood on the frontier line, and reached Innsbruck on the morning of the ninth. After a week at Munich, he went to Passau, thence in a small boat down the Danube to Linzpeople and talking the language; and at once inscribed myself again for the malle-posteby the passage of the Stelvio to Innsbruck. Started Sunday morning at eleven o'clock, and arrived at Innsbruck Wednesday morning at ten; sleeping out of the carrInnsbruck Wednesday morning at ten; sleeping out of the carriage but three and a half hours during those three days and three nights. The pass over the Alps is magnificent, dwarfing infinitely any thing I have ever seen among the mountains of New Hampshire or Vermont. It is the highest road in Europe, beinair Tyrolese who invited me, through an interpreter, to waltz while some wandering Hungarians played. After one day at Innsbruck, left for Munich,—a day and a night. In the malle-postefound a very pleasant Englishman, quite a linguist, an ancient
Peru, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ssages in that month are short and the accommodations excellent, and the fare less than in a steamer. I have been sad at the news of the loss of the Lexington. I cannot express my grief at this account, and my indignation at the managers of that boat. And the Great Archer has been shooting his arrows across my path, before and behind. The Allgemeine Zeitung, a few days since, announced the death of Mrs. Clay, the wife of our Secretary at Vienna, J. Randolph Clay, afterwards Minister to Peru. He and Sumner seem to have become much interested in each other during their brief intercourse in Vienna. whom I came to know quite well during my stay there. She was an Englishwoman,—beautiful, graceful, and accomplished. At Prince Metternich's I thought her among the most beautiful. She has died young, leaving two children. And then there was old Mr. Justice Vaughan. I think that he loved me. He showed me the greatest marks of confidence. He often talked with me about cases before h
Savigny Friedrich Karl von Savigny, 1779-1861. He was a Professor in the University of Berlin, 1810-1842; and was appointed, in 1842, Minister of Justice of Prussia. I know well, and have had the great pleasure of discussing with him the question of codification. I was told in Paris that he had modified his views on this substers I know already; and I have been well received by the Crown Prince, and the Prince William, and their princesses. Frederick William III. was then King of Prussia. He was born Aug. 3, 1770, succeeded to the throne Nov. 16, 1797, and died June 7, 1840. The Crown Prince was his son, Frederick William IV., who was born Oct. utions, or rather for some, for they have none. The King of Sweden, old Bernadotte, cannot live long, and his death will be the signal for a change. The King of Prussia is old; his people will demand a constitution on his death, which his successor may be too prudent to deny, though his inclinations are against it: at heart a ve
Karlsruhe (Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
son in the place, so simple is every thing here. Indeed, Mr. Thibaut called me the grand seigneur. Farewell. Remember me, as ever, to Mrs. Story (whom I hope to find well) and the children, and believe me, As ever, affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. P. S. A friend of mine here, Dr. Bissing, Dr. Frederic Bissing died about 1874. He was second Burgermeister (Vice-Mayor) of Heidelberg, and for many years represented the district of Heidelberg in the Diet of Baden, meeting at Carlsruhe. who has already translated Chancellor Kent on our Constitution, thinks of translating your great work on the Constitution. He is now studying it with great delight. Dr. Julius says, in his book on America, that your work has gone to a second edition in four volumes. Is this true? A Dr. Buss, of Tubingen, has already translated the historical part, and intended to go on with it; but he has recently experienced a political change against democratic institutions, and has thrown up the wo
Hesse (Hesse, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
they were ground and sharpened, then to the assembling room where the students were drinking and smoking, then to the contest, where the combatants were attended by a doctor who very coolly smoked all the while, and surrounded by students with pipes in their mouths. A student this week has lost his nose; it being cut off at one blow. It has since been sewed on; but he has brushed it off twice in the night. It was from this neighborhood that Dr. Follen, Dr. Follen was born in Romrod, Hesse-Darmstadt. or as he is here called Dr Follenius, came; and his death is sincerely lamented by all the Germans with whom I have spoken. At a large supper-party last night, of professors and doctors, I communicated it. To Judge Story. Heidelberg, Feb. 10, 1840. my dear Judge,— . . . You dispose of my views about raising the standard of education in Harvard College summarily enough. Would that I had your influence on that question! The age, our national character, our future destinie
Pompeii (Italy) (search for this): chapter 16
e floors, or in the open air. Man's season is over; but God's is come. If, then, you are in Rome during the summer, you will see high solemnities of the Church enough without witnessing those of Easter. Corpus Christi day, at the end of June, will be enough for you. See, as you propose, Sicily,—though I would make but a short stay there; then go to Naples where there is much to interest; the Museum is very rich, both in antiquities and paintings: and then, on one side, there is Pompeii, Herculaneum, Vesuvius, Paestum; and, on the other Baiae, Cumae, &c. Do not fail to procure Valery's book on Italy, in French; the Brussels edition is in one volume, and therefore more portable, as well as cheaper than the three volumes of Paris. This book is the production of a scholar; and all the spots are described with references to the ancient classics. To you in particular, who have not had the advantage of an early classical education, it will be indispensable. Read also Eustace's Classica
Switzerland (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 16
Fay. In 1842-43, Sumner intervened successfully with Mr. Webster, then Secretary of State in behalf of Mr. Fay, whose position was endangered by an intrigue. In 1861, he obtained an assurance from Mr. Lincoln that Mr. Fay, then Minister to Switzerland, should not be disturbed; but the President soon after gave the place to another as a reward for party service. Fay wrote to Sumner from Berlin, Jan. 14, 1840, warm with affection: Your departure, he said, has thrown a shade over our little I inscribed my name for a place in the malle-postefor that evening as far as Milan. We started at eight o'clock; it poured down cataracts: my companions, a countess, and an honest father with his son, a boy of fourteen, going to a school in Switzerland to prepare for trade by learning book-keeping, geography, history, arithmetic, and to speak English, French, German, and Italian. All that night we rode in the midst of a tremendous storm. It is exciting to rattle over the pavements of villa
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