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New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ning of the Caroline as your act. Of course, all individual liability is merged in the Queen's responsibility. We cannot justly condemn McLeod more than the French the Duke of Wellington, if any one should pursue him at Paris for a murder committed after the battle of Waterloo. But, I think, all English lawyers will see that there are difficulties in arranging the manner of taking advantage of the defence which McLeod has. He has been indicted; and, unless the Attorney-General of the State of New York, who is the prosecuting officer, is willing to take the responsibility of entering a nolle prosequi,— which I presume he will not do,—the defence must be set up at the trial, that the act charged is not cognizable by the court. Be assured that this will all be arranged in conformity with the law of nations. Next comes the question of the Caroline. There again you are in the right. On the facts as stated, you were justified in destroying that ship, as you did; and of this opinion ar
Germany (Germany) (search for this): chapter 22
court; and for the last two months, besides attending to my professional business, printing the third volume of my Reports. . . . Behold me now, dear Lieber, in the tug and sweat of my profession, with rays of sunlight streaming from across the sea, and with the greater source of pleasure in my thoughts of what I have seen and enjoyed. Each steamer brings me some testimony of kindness or courtesy, and so I am not allowed to forget the scenes I have left behind. Would that I were in your Deutschland! . . . Sitting in this small office is a change from the scenes of the last three years. I have been in court all day, then read law, and now in my office, late in the evening, scrawl you these unsatisfactory lines. . . . Have you read Hallam's History of Literature? Is it not the great book of the age? I have been charmed by its learning, sagacity, and honesty. How careful Hallam is in the expression of his opinions. His style of criticism is a model of candor, impartiality, and care
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
mplished man of my country. Our politics are shabby enough. The Whigs, constituting the opposition, have nominated for the Presidency the person whose head adorns a corner of this sheet. He has in his favor his good conduct during the war of 1812, and an alleged victory at Tippecanoe; and the vulgar appeal is made, grounded on military success. This has made him a more acceptable candidate than Clay or Webster, who have been serving the State well for years. Harrison lives in the State of Ohio, cultivating his farm with his own hands; and, as what is called help in that part of the country is not easy to be procured, his wife and daughter cook and serve the dinner for the seven or eight people who daily challenge his hospitality. An Administration paper alluded to him as living in a log-cabin and drinking hard cider. The Whigs at once adopted these words and placed them on their favors. They proclaimed Harrison the candidate of the log-cabin and hard-cider class. And this
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ished in the October number of the American Jurist. It has been read with great satisfaction. When shall we have the continuation? To Dr. Francis Lieber, Columbia, S. C. Boston, Dec. 10, 1840. Don't, dear Lieber, be offended by my long silence. I am in the midst of my profession; for the last two days have been all the tise; but we must prepare for action. New York is thronged and busy as ever. Love to all our friends. Ever and ever yours, C. S To Dr. Francis Lieber, Columbia, S. C. Hudson, on the North River, Tuesday evening, Sept. 28, 1841. dear Lieber,—Here I am, imprisoned by the rain in the inn of a Yankee village. Longing now is Lieber. institution for the blind, South Boston, Nov. 30, 1841. my dear Lieber,—I am here with Dr. Howe, on a farewell visit. He starts to-morrow for Columbia, S. C., to endeavor to induce your Legislature to do something for the blind. The Doctor moves rapidly, and will be in Columbia almost as soon as this letter. Cann
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 22
s, of scholars, new books, and public life; Mrs. Grote, of her husband's studies and friends, and of public affairs; Kenyon, of society and literary men. Morpeth, who was disinclined to letter-writing, wrote to him from time to time,—always with much affection. Occasional letters came from Sir Charles R. Vaughan; H. Bellenden Ker; Henry Reeve; Abraham Hayward; Alexander Cochrane; Thomas Brown; Mrs. Anne B. Montagu; Edward Rushton, of Liverpool; Edward Dowling, Mr. Dowling went in 1840 to Canada, as legal adviser of the Governor-General, and died there in 1844. and others. Thomas Falconer, who visited Texas, and published a book on the Discovery of the Mississippi, wrote frequently while travelling, and while at home at Putney Hall. From Mittermaier, Foelix, and Julius, he also received tidings, —particularly from Mittermaier, who wrote in German. Fay kept him informed of society in Berlin, and of German politics. J. Randolph Clay wrote from Vienna of affairs in Eastern Europe.
Ligny (Belgium) (search for this): chapter 22
c d'enghien perplex me somewhat; but when we meet we will solve these. . . . Good-by! Ever and ever yours, C. S. To Dr. Francis Lieber. Boston, June 28, 1841. Anniversary of the Battle of Monmouth, when the American army fainted under the heat and Washington reproved Lee. Lieber was accustomed to date his letters as of some historic day, usually that of a battle; and Sumner, in dating this letter to him, took note of his habit. dear Lieber,—Yours of the day of the Battle of Ligny is before me. Thanks. I see a difficulty in the way of graduating duties on books by their value. There will be fraud, deception, and the like in assigning the value, besides greater difficulty than by weight. I find this is Judge Story's opinion also. He says, let all books in foreign languages come in duty free. So say I. At present there is a duty of four cents a volume. Let all English books more than ten years old (I would say ten years from the first edition) come in duty free .
t the Craigie House. He spent many evenings with Mr. Ticknor, comparing their European experiences. Mr. Daveis wrote from Portland, May 21: Ticknor tells me of yo the confidence that he should defeat the prophecies of those who had said his European visit would spoil him for the law; but at others, notwithstanding this sense oondence with foreigners, after his return front Europe, was very large. Every European mail brought its welcome parcel of letters; and its arrival was awaited with e, and of German politics. J. Randolph Clay wrote from Vienna of affairs in Eastern Europe. His brother George wrote of the public men and politics of France and othroughly welcome letter from your own home. I cannot help being gratified that European, and especially English, recollections have not lost their hold upon you; but ncient scenes that I could not scrawl even a hasty letter to you. . . . My European drama is wound up; the iron curtain has fallen upon it. Ah! you know full wel
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 22
the Conquest of Mexico. It will be in three volumes, but will not be finished for several years. Sparks is in London or Paris, hunting in the offices for materials for a history of the Revolution. Bancroft's third volume is just published. It isonsibility. We cannot justly condemn McLeod more than the French the Duke of Wellington, if any one should pursue him at Paris for a murder committed after the battle of Waterloo. But, I think, all English lawyers will see that there are difficulte work, bringing it down to the adoption of the Federal Constitution. Sparks, you doubtless know, has been in London and Paris the last summer, collecting materials in the public offices for a history of the American Revolution. He will go over Ba, has come . . . . Sparks has just returned, laden with the fruits of his researches in the public archives of London and Paris. I dined in company with him yesterday at Prescott's. There were Ticknor, William H. Gardiner, Samuel A. Eliot, Palfrey,
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 22
desires to be remembered to you. He and all your friends here have sympathized with you in the death of your son. I am glad to hear of Grosch's health and prosperity, and hope he enjoyed himself in England. Tell him that I have not forgotten that I am his debtor for a long and generous letter. I shall write to him very soon. With cordial salutations to all your family and to the Hepps, believe me, Most sincerely and faithfully yours, Charles Sumner. To Dr. Lieber, then at Washington, D. C., he wrote, July 5, 1841:— I agree with you entirely about Webster's massive and yet graceful letter. Letter of April 24, 1841, to Mr. Fox. Webster's Works, Vol. VI. p. 250. It is a chef d'oeuvre;and I do not make the criticism you do with regard to McLeod's release. I think Webster was right in that, and I regard this as one of the most important parts,—the distinct admission, formally and diplomatically, for the first time in history, of a great and important principle of th
North River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
tion. New York is thronged and busy as ever. Love to all our friends. Ever and ever yours, C. S To Dr. Francis Lieber, Columbia, S. C. Hudson, on the North River, Tuesday evening, Sept. 28, 1841. dear Lieber,—Here I am, imprisoned by the rain in the inn of a Yankee village. Longing now for companionship, I write to or he was their legal Gamaliel, and strutted in his oaths, and echoed to his descants on wines. . . . This morning, at seven o'clock, I took the boat up the North River, a noble stream, wanting only that element of which we were speaking yesterday,—association,—to be infinitely beautiful and interesting. West Point is a beauti all anxious to get you back in Boston; but nathless, I wish you to enjoy the autumn, as long as it is enjoyable, in journeying about. You may linger along the North River, stopping at various points of interest. Webster regretted missing you very much; but he promised himself the pleasure of showing you the hospitalities of Wa<
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