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ccess won in this way was short-lived. Law Reporter, April, 1846, Vol. VIII. pp. 556-558. The American sources of the annotator of English Chancery Reports were then very limited, consisting chiefly of the New York series of reports by Johnson, Paige, and Edwards, a few volumes issued in South Carolina, North Carolina, and Maryland, besides cases in equity heard in other States, which were intermingled in the reports with those decided at law. But the English Chancery Reports published later best people here, and is reputed to have peculiar skill in the treatment of the insane. I lead a very quiet life this winter, avoiding assemblies of people. Last week I dined out twice,—once with Mr. Webster, to enjoy a turbot (a tribute to him from England), and again to meet him at Mrs. Paige's sumptuous table. It is now past midnight; and the New Year has let fall its first footsteps on the snow. May it have for you an abundant store of blessings! Ever affectionately thine, C. S
Fraulein Julia (search for this): chapter 30
e Life of Philip are accumulating on his hands, and already are very rich. He has just returned from a pleasant trip to Niagara, with his daughter. . . . Mary and Julia are at Waltham; and Mary seems to gain in strength, or at least to hold her own,—so as for the time to banish the gloomy anxieties which I entertained six weeks agd another left who has little pleasure in staying? To his brother George. Boston, Aug. 15, 1844. my dear George,—You see that I still use the handwriting of Julia; for the fever still pertinaciously occupies my hands. I have been slowly gaining in strength since my letter by the last steamer, and have driven some nine or ted at the thought of Mary, with a disease, like stern destiny, preying upon her: and yet she has been spared longer than I had once ventured to hope. A letter from Julia yesterday mentioned that Mary had withdrawn to her chamber, which she will never leave, except for Paradise. I hope that you and your wife will find a few moments
William Pitt (search for this): chapter 30
s made Solicitor-General and knighted. In Feb., 1793, on the promotion of Sir Archibald Macdonald to the office of Chief Baron of the Exchequer, Sir John Scott became Attorney-General, and very soon afterwards commenced the important State prosecutions against Hardy and Horne Tooke. On the death of Sir James Eyre, in July, 1799, he was raised to the peerage as Baron Eldon, and appointed to the vacant office of Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. In the spring of 1801, on the retirement of Mr. Pitt's administration, he was advanced to the post of Lord High Chancellor. On the accession of the Whigs to power, he resigned the great seal, Feb. 7, 1806, giving place to Lord Erskine. He resumed it, April 1, 1807, from which time he maintained his seat on the woolsack till April 30, 1827, being altogether a period of nearly twenty-five years,—a longer service than was allotted to any of his predecessors. It was so long as to be called in derision by Jeremy Bentham the reign of John the Se
William Johnson (search for this): chapter 30
II. pp. 556-558. The American sources of the annotator of English Chancery Reports were then very limited, consisting chiefly of the New York series of reports by Johnson, Paige, and Edwards, a few volumes issued in South Carolina, North Carolina, and Maryland, besides cases in equity heard in other States, which were intermingled etch of his character; and Mr. Justice Story speaks of him with the warm appreciation of a kindred mind. Lord Eldon. This is the first appearance [Waddle v. Johnson, 1789] in these Reports of one of the most distinguished characters in the English law. The Solicitor-General at this time was Sir John Scott, destined, under thethink both you and he proceed on a wrong principle. Man is properly formed to love his fellow-man, and not to dislike him. I have always detested the saying of Dr. Johnson, that he loved a good hater. Let me rather say, I love a good lover. From the kindly appreciation of the character and condition of nations and individuals w
he breathed the invigorating air of the Berkshire hills, took frequent rides to Lenox, and occasional excursions beyond to Lanesborough and Williamstown. Among welle to her house; and I have in my mind pleasing visions of jolting excursions to Lenox and Stockbridge. Anxious for a change of air, I hurry on this expedition withoe most agreeable by the kindest hospitality. We took a drive the first day to Lenox, where the Sedgwicks received me most warmly,—somewhat as one risen from the de my dear Hillard,—. . . On Saturday, Edward Austin drove me in an open buggy to Lenox, where we dined with Sam. Ward. He jolted us in his wagon to view the farms,—oo Stockbridge, back to Lenox, then to Newport. Write me and send me letters to Lenox. Tell Felton to write me another of his clever letters; and I wish a line fromters as he can enliven by his pen. Ever affectionately thine, C. S. From Lenox he wrote to Dr. Howe, Sept. 13, 1844:— Here I am, the guest of Sam Ward,
John Parker (search for this): chapter 30
head. Fame and fortune are becoming your handmaidens. I have not yet seen the pieces belonging to Jonathan Phillips The Cupid of Crawford belonged to Mr. Phillips, and the Bride of Abydos and a bas-relief of Christ blessing Children, to Mr. Parker. or John Parker; but hear others, who have seen them, speak of them as I could wish. In my earliest hour of leisure, when I may wander abroad by daylight, I shall call and see them. You will see much of my friends this winter in Rome. I loJohn Parker; but hear others, who have seen them, speak of them as I could wish. In my earliest hour of leisure, when I may wander abroad by daylight, I shall call and see them. You will see much of my friends this winter in Rome. I long to refresh my parched lips at the living fountains of art bursting forth from dead Rome, and should have delight in joining Howe and his lovely group; but I must try to see with their eyes. Greene has given you fresh tidings of American life and of our circle,—your friends here. He must have found us dull and prosaic, and I doubt not hurried back with a most willing heart. Give him my love. He must report his arrival. Ever very sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To Professor Mitterm
Charles Sedgwick (search for this): chapter 30
the guest of Samuel G. Ward, he drove to Stockbridge and passed the day at Charles Sedgwick's, Charles Sedgwick was clerk of the courts of Berkshire. He died in 1Charles Sedgwick was clerk of the courts of Berkshire. He died in 1856, at the age of sixty-four. His father, Judge Sedgwick, who died in 1813, had three other sons,—Theodore, of Stockbridge, who died in 1839; Robert, of New York, wJudge Sedgwick, who died in 1813, had three other sons,—Theodore, of Stockbridge, who died in 1839; Robert, of New York, who died in 1841; and Henry D., of New York, who died in 1831; and also a daughter,—Catherine, the author,—who died in 1867. The Judge's son Theodore, whose widow wasfriend and correspondent of Sumner, and the author of the Law of Damages. Charles Sedgwick was remarkable for his friendliness and genial conversation. Among the mahe latter's want of humor, and habit of taking all he heard in dead earnest, Mr. Sedgwick said: What a capital editor of an American Punch Sumner would make! whose sister Catherine, well-known in authorship, was there visiting. At Mr. Sedgwick's he met Mrs. Frances Kemble. He was charmed with her society in horseback rides; her
Horne Tooke (search for this): chapter 30
that he gave the fruits of the first year of his professional life for pocket-money to his wife. She received half a guinea. But very soon he acquired a large practice and the favor of Lord Thurlow. In June, 1788, he was made Solicitor-General and knighted. In Feb., 1793, on the promotion of Sir Archibald Macdonald to the office of Chief Baron of the Exchequer, Sir John Scott became Attorney-General, and very soon afterwards commenced the important State prosecutions against Hardy and Horne Tooke. On the death of Sir James Eyre, in July, 1799, he was raised to the peerage as Baron Eldon, and appointed to the vacant office of Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. In the spring of 1801, on the retirement of Mr. Pitt's administration, he was advanced to the post of Lord High Chancellor. On the accession of the Whigs to power, he resigned the great seal, Feb. 7, 1806, giving place to Lord Erskine. He resumed it, April 1, 1807, from which time he maintained his seat on the woolsack ti
yed in acknowledging your kindness in sending me your Thursday Lecture Mr. Waterston gave in this discourse, delivered Dec. 14, 1843, a history of the Thursday Lecture. and address on Pauperism, Delivered Feb. 4, 1844. because I wished to enjoy them before returning you my thanks. I have seized some moments of leisure this evening, and have learned how much I am indebted to you. The Thursday Lecture is a curious contribution to our early history, written with the antiquarian glow of Dr. Pierce. You trace it, unlike the Nile, whose sources are still hidden, to its most distant springs, and bring us to stand with you by the side of its gushing waters. The address on Pauperism is a beautiful exposition of a most interesting subject. Your pictures, while they are sketched in perfect taste, are calculated to awaken a lively impression of the melancholy realities which they illustrate. I wish you would tell me whether it is proper, on any occasion, to give alms to a chance begga
receiving the necessary two-thirds vote; but the scheme was afterwards consummated by joint resolutions of Congress, approved by President Tyler, March 2, 1845. which was entered into in fraud of the rights of Mexico, and in defiance of the principles of the laws of nations. The Locofoco party, in adopting the measure of annexation, have assumed a burden which it will be difficult for them to bear with united shoulders. I personally know several in New York, warm in their attachment to Mr. Van Buren and to the general principles of the party, who view the nomination of Polk, under all the circumstances, with indignation. Still, Bancroft, who is the leader of his faction in New England, and in the event of its success will be Minister to London or Paris, tells me that his party is united; that it was never more so; and that without doubt it will carry the Presidential election. To me Mr. Clay's prospects seem almost absolutely certain. Never, indeed, within my recollection of part
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