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or Morpeth at Abbott Lawrence's, Judge Story talked high conservatism. Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. p. 30. Thackeray, whose visit was a few years later, found a vast amount of toryism and donnishness everywhere. A Collection of Letters, 1847-1855, p. 165. Sumner, who was familiar with the talk at dinners and in drawing-rooms, wrote, in 1852, to his brother George, then in Europe: There are beautiful and generous spirits in Boston, but the prevailing tone of its society is provincial one who had approved an attack on his family. Ante, vol. II. pp. 254, 255. The intervention of Prescott was necessary to restore good relations, broken in consequence of an offhand and overheard remark. The prison-discipline controversy of 1845-1847, treated later in these pages, will show how family sympathies gave a personal direction to public controversies. Bancroft, the historian, escaped from a community where a Democrat was regarded as little better than a Jacobin, and years after
tted to the Society. Richard Hildreth's History of the United States did not bring him membership while he remained in Boston, but after his removal to New York he was made a corresponding member. Sumner was not chosen a member till a few weeks before his death. James Freeman Clarke's membership came late in his life, though his knowledge of history was always wide and accurate. All these were antislavery agitators. The Wednesday Club, its members meeting at one another's houses, which in 1877 completed its first century, has at all times enrolled names honorably known in science, literature, and public life. Mr. Winthrop on the occasion, May 9, 1877, described the distinguished membership at different periods. R. C. Winthrop's Addresses and Speeches, vol. III. p. 459. There has been also the Thursday Club, of which Mr. Everett was at one time President, and the Friday Club, to the latter of which Mr. Ticknor belonged. At the Thursday Club the custom has been to read papers o
than a Jacobin, and years after his removal assured a friend that it was a comfort to live in New York rather than in Boston. R. H. Dana, Jr., wrote to Sumner in 1851, Boston oligarchy is confined to the pavements and Nahant. Prescott wrote to Sumner in 1851 of a former period in Salem similar in character: Judge Story in his e1851 of a former period in Salem similar in character: Judge Story in his early days was exposed to much obloquy from the bitterness of party feeling, which becomes more intensified in proportion to the narrowness of the sphere where it is displayed. Boston is worse than New York in this respect. The capitalists were greatly interested in a protective tariff, and its maintenance was the one end of tho the conventional standard. Men of courage who pushed moral principles into politics were stigmatized as fanatics and demagogues. A Frenchman visiting Boston in 1851 found that the mention of Sumner's name in social life made certain people shiver (frissonner), because he was a Free Soiler, and suspected of abolitionism, though
. i. p. 30. Thackeray, whose visit was a few years later, found a vast amount of toryism and donnishness everywhere. A Collection of Letters, 1847-1855, p. 165. Sumner, who was familiar with the talk at dinners and in drawing-rooms, wrote, in 1852, to his brother George, then in Europe: There are beautiful and generous spirits in Boston, but the prevailing tone of its society is provincial toryism. Persons freshly returned from Europe, who have hearts, are at first disturbed by it, then sturope, and were quite unanimous in their want of sympathy with the uprisings of 1848. They were as much perplexed with fear of change as kings or any privileged orders. Life of Ticknor, vol. II. pp. 230, 234, 236. Sumner wrote to his brother in 1852: You must not confound the opinion of Boston with that of Massachusetts. The Commonwealth is for Kossuth; the city is against him. The line is broadly drawn. The same line is run between my political supporters and opponents. The city is bigote
Chapter 29: Society in Boston. 1845-1860. A view of the society of Boston,—of the character and tendencies of its ruling class,—at the close of the first half of this century is essential to a just comprehension of the position of an agitator in such a community for moral and political reforms. The subject has only been toucarles Sumner's career. For a description of Boston in 1825, see ante, vol. i. p. 45. The characteristics of the people and society were much the same from 1820-1860. There are touches of Boston in 1860 in the Life, Letters, and Journals of Ticknor, vol. i. pp. 315, 316. The population of the city grew between 1845 and 181860 in the Life, Letters, and Journals of Ticknor, vol. i. pp. 315, 316. The population of the city grew between 1845 and 1850 from 115,000 to 137,000, and five years later exceeded 160,000. Its territory was still confined to the peninsula,—Charlestown, Roxbury, and Dorchester being as yet suburban towns. Mansions surrounded by gardens had disappeared, and had given place to blocks. Fort Hill, long a residential quarter of rich people, had been aba<
60. There are touches of Boston in 1860 in the Life, Letters, and Journals of Ticknor, vol. i. pp. 315, 316. The population of the city grew between 1845 and 1850 from 115,000 to 137,000, and five years later exceeded 160,000. Its territory was still confined to the peninsula,—Charlestown, Roxbury, and Dorchester being as ypp. 217, 218, 265, 272, 285, 286, 446. When their representative in Congress, separating himself from his Northern associates, voted for the Fugitive Slave law in 1850, he suffered no reproach or loss of support from the mass of his party in the city; and the willing agents in its execution lost no favor, social or political. Lo battlefields of the Civil War. Children were then taught dancing by the elder Papanti, as now by his son; and his hall, now resorted to only by youths, was before 1850 often the scene of assemblies where one might see the wit, beauty, and fashion of the town. The household life of Boston at this time was most attractive. Trav
186, 235, 464, 479. They reverenced Alexander Hamilton, hated Jefferson, distrusted the Adamses, were more or less in sympathy with the Hartford Convention; They called themselves old Federalists, though the party had ceased to exist. Life of Ticknor, vol. II. p. 186. and as soon as Daniel Webster showed his power and disposition to serve them, they rallied round him as the conservative leader, and followed as he led to the end of his career. Their typical man was Harrison Gray Otis, 1765-1848. a silvertongued orator, who bore a name honored in the colony, and who was a popular favorite, elected often to State and national offices, beginning life as a Federalist, and ending it with a protest against the antislavery cause; Boston Advertiser, April 3, 1848. He died Oct. 28, 1848. To his credit it should be remembered that he opposed the extension of slavery at the time of the Missouri Compromise. he sighed in his old age for a more aristocratic polity than ours, and fixed t
rculating them. Life of Ticknor, vol. II. p. 235. The social exclusion practised by Ticknor on Sumner and antislavery men is mentioned in Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. pp. 128. 176, 177. It will be seen that Judge William Kent, though as ill-affected toward anti-slavery agitation, thought the attempt of Ticknor, the Eliots, and others to ostracize Sumner, unwise and unfair. Social unity was assisted by old organizations and clubs. The Massachusetts Historical Society, founded in 1791, has long done good service in preserving the details of national and local history, Its first centenary was commemorated Jan. 24, 1891, with an oration by T. W. Higginson, and addresses by Rev. George E. Ellis and Robert C. Winthrop; and the public exercises were followed by a reception at Mr. Winthrop's house. and its succession of presidents, distinguished by the names of Savage, Winthrop, and Ellis, are an assurance of genuine merit in investigation. Theodore Parker, Wendell Phillip
century is essential to a just comprehension of the position of an agitator in such a community for moral and political reforms. The subject has only been touched casually in memoirs and books of travel, without an attempt to treat it comprehensively; and a brief review of life in the city as it then was fitly opens the new period of Charles Sumner's career. For a description of Boston in 1825, see ante, vol. i. p. 45. The characteristics of the people and society were much the same from 1820-1860. There are touches of Boston in 1860 in the Life, Letters, and Journals of Ticknor, vol. i. pp. 315, 316. The population of the city grew between 1845 and 1850 from 115,000 to 137,000, and five years later exceeded 160,000. Its territory was still confined to the peninsula,—Charlestown, Roxbury, and Dorchester being as yet suburban towns. Mansions surrounded by gardens had disappeared, and had given place to blocks. Fort Hill, long a residential quarter of rich people, had been
Chapter 29: Society in Boston. 1845-1860. A view of the society of Boston,—of the character and tendencies of its ruling class,—at the close of the first half of this century is essential to a just comprehension of the position of an agitator in such a community for moral and political reforms. The subject has only been toucm 1820-1860. There are touches of Boston in 1860 in the Life, Letters, and Journals of Ticknor, vol. i. pp. 315, 316. The population of the city grew between 1845 and 1850 from 115,000 to 137,000, and five years later exceeded 160,000. Its territory was still confined to the peninsula,—Charlestown, Roxbury, and Dorchester be intervention of Prescott was necessary to restore good relations, broken in consequence of an offhand and overheard remark. The prison-discipline controversy of 1845-1847, treated later in these pages, will show how family sympathies gave a personal direction to public controversies. Bancroft, the historian, escaped from a <
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