hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charles Sumner 1,580 0 Browse Search
George Sumner 1,494 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 642 0 Browse Search
Robert C. Winthrop 392 0 Browse Search
Henry Wilson 348 0 Browse Search
William H. Seward 342 0 Browse Search
Fletcher Webster 328 0 Browse Search
Douglas 236 8 Browse Search
Edward Everett 224 0 Browse Search
Benjamin F. Butler 208 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. Search the whole document.

Found 250 total hits in 125 results.

... 8 9 10 11 12 13
f Boston,—of the character and tendencies of its ruling class,—at the close of the first half of this century is essential to a just comprehension of the position of an agitator in such a community for moral and political reforms. The subject has only been touched casually in memoirs and books of travel, without an attempt to treat it comprehensively; and a brief review of life in the city as it then was fitly opens the new period of Charles Sumner's career. For a description of Boston in 1825, see ante, vol. i. p. 45. The characteristics of the people and society were much the same from 1820-1860. There are touches of Boston in 1860 in the Life, Letters, and Journals of Ticknor, vol. i. pp. 315, 316. The population of the city grew between 1845 and 1850 from 115,000 to 137,000, and five years later exceeded 160,000. Its territory was still confined to the peninsula,—Charlestown, Roxbury, and Dorchester being as yet suburban towns. Mansions surrounded by gardens had disapp<
ted, a day or two later, from the view taken at the dinner referred to; and the former was always full of faith and hope in democracy as a means of social improvement, guided, as he did his best to guide it, by the ethical spirit. At a dinner for Morpeth at Abbott Lawrence's, Judge Story talked high conservatism. Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. p. 30. Thackeray, whose visit was a few years later, found a vast amount of toryism and donnishness everywhere. A Collection of Letters, 1847-1855, p. 165. Sumner, who was familiar with the talk at dinners and in drawing-rooms, wrote, in 1852, to his brother George, then in Europe: There are beautiful and generous spirits in Boston, but the prevailing tone of its society is provincial toryism. Persons freshly returned from Europe, who have hearts, are at first disturbed by it, then straightway adopt it. Witness the C——'s. Longfellow, referring to the proneness of some persons to find little good in their own country after returning
186, 235, 464, 479. They reverenced Alexander Hamilton, hated Jefferson, distrusted the Adamses, were more or less in sympathy with the Hartford Convention; They called themselves old Federalists, though the party had ceased to exist. Life of Ticknor, vol. II. p. 186. and as soon as Daniel Webster showed his power and disposition to serve them, they rallied round him as the conservative leader, and followed as he led to the end of his career. Their typical man was Harrison Gray Otis, 1765-1848. a silvertongued orator, who bore a name honored in the colony, and who was a popular favorite, elected often to State and national offices, beginning life as a Federalist, and ending it with a protest against the antislavery cause; Boston Advertiser, April 3, 1848. He died Oct. 28, 1848. To his credit it should be remembered that he opposed the extension of slavery at the time of the Missouri Compromise. he sighed in his old age for a more aristocratic polity than ours, and fixed t
is given in his Life by J. P. Kennedy. who had been taught that there was nothing good in Yankees, and the Englishman, Dickens's American Notes. The best description of the literary life of Boston at this period, given by any foreign visitor, is by John G. Kohl, a German, in his paper entitled The American Athens, contributed to Bentley's Miscellany, and reprinted in Littell's Living Age, Jan. 18, 1862, and H. T. Tuckerman's America and her Commentators, pp. 311-318. His visit was made in 1857. who was filled with equal prejudice against all Americans, were alike charmed as soon as they crossed its threshold; and both bore cordial tribute to the hospitality, heartiness, and refinement which they found wherever they went. The houses were rich in the appointments already noted. Host and hostess presided with dignity and grace; and the young women, distinguished by intelligence, style, winsomeness, and often beauty, could play well their part in any society in the world. Foremost
t of foreign schools, and had seen the best of foreign life. Both before and after he took his house on Park Street, his home was for more than a generation the resort of all that was most distinguished in the culture of the period; and he was assisted in this refined hospitality by one who was his peer in accomplishments, and who graced the society of Boston and Cambridge from youth to age. There came foreigners of high rank or repute, who from time to time visited the city,— among them, in 1824, Lafayette, and four young Englishmen, Wortley, Stanley, Labouchere, and Denison; and later, Tocqueville, Morpeth, Dickens, Lyell, and Thackeray. There as a daily visitor was Hillard, almost the peer of the brilliant conversers of Holland and Lansdowne houses in their palmiest days, or of those who gathered round Samuel Rogers in St. James's Place. But with all this, and not overlooking his review of Spanish literature, it is doing no injustice to Ticknor's rank in letters to say, that, unli
... 8 9 10 11 12 13