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n; in the evening went to Mr. Russell Sturgis's at Walton. September 20. Returned to London, and went to Lord Cranworth's in Kent; his place is Holwood, once the residence of William Pitt; walked in the grounds. September 21. Called on Mr. Hallam, who was with his son-in-law, Colonel Cator, in the neighborhood of Lord Cranworth's; found him looking well in the face, but unable to use his legs; sat with him half an hour; It was his last meeting with Hallam, who died in the following January. took the train for London; dined at Reform Club with Mr. Parkes. September 22. Dined at Reform Club with Mr. Parkes, where I met Mr. Osborne, M. P., also Peter Cunningham and Charles Mackay. September 24. Went to Dulwich Gallery; left cards; dined with Mr. Cooke, a partner of John Murray and old friend of the late James Brown [the publisher, of Boston]. September 25. Left London in the train at 9.15 for Manchester; stopped at Palatine Hotel; went at once to the Exhibition. Sept
January 26th (search for this): chapter 13
he went through the remarkable Gray collection. He was so intense in this pursuit that he wearied out any one who joined him in it. Longfellow wrote in his diary, Jan. 21, 1858:-- We again passed the morning with the engravings, and again brought Sumner and Thies home to dinner, which they left midway to go back to the portfolios. Sumner is insatiable. He will be the death of Thies, who is ill. For my part, I cannot take in so much at once; it fatigues my brain and body. Again, January 26:-- Sumner comes to dinner. He was last night at our neighbor C.'s, looking over his engravings; and this morning at Thies's house, engaged on his private collection. Verily, he goes thoroughly through the work. Sumner began at this time to collect engravings for himself,--those now preserved in the Boston Art Museum. To Dr. Howe he wrote, March 17: I wish you would be good enough to send to Louis Thies, of Cambridge, a check for one ZZZZ The best portraits in engraving. Works,
Philadelphia with Mr. Furness, at the Brevoort House in New York, at his home in Boston, or at Longfellow's in Cambridge. At this time he turned to engravings for employment and pastime. His interest in them hitherto had been general, but it now became almost a passion. He availed himself of such as were accessible in Washington; private collections in Philadelphia, New York, Boston, and Cambridge were opened to him; he passed days in the Astor Library ; Sumner wrote to Longfellow, March 3: Each day I go to the Astor Library, which is as fascinating as Boccaccio's garden, and wandering in the beautiful, well-arranged alcoves, every book tells its tale, and every hour is more than a Decameron. It is a most charming retreat. He missed here an old friend of whom he wrote to Dr. Howe, March 4: Poor Cogswell I he has been obliged to leave for the present. The hand of death seems to be upon him. It is he who is really the fundator perficiens of this beautiful library. Dr. Cogsw
were accessible in Washington; private collections in Philadelphia, New York, Boston, and Cambridge were opened to him; he passed days in the Astor Library ; Sumner wrote to Longfellow, March 3: Each day I go to the Astor Library, which is as fascinating as Boccaccio's garden, and wandering in the beautiful, well-arranged alcoves, every book tells its tale, and every hour is more than a Decameron. It is a most charming retreat. He missed here an old friend of whom he wrote to Dr. Howe, March 4: Poor Cogswell I he has been obliged to leave for the present. The hand of death seems to be upon him. It is he who is really the fundator perficiens of this beautiful library. Dr. Cogswell, though resigning his place as superintendent of the Astor Library, lived till 1871. Ante, vol. II. pp. 130, 131, 141, 143, 145, 147, 172, 185. but the richest treasures of the kind he found in the library of Harvard College, where under the guidance of Dr. Louis Thies he went through the remarkable G
March 17th (search for this): chapter 13
He will be the death of Thies, who is ill. For my part, I cannot take in so much at once; it fatigues my brain and body. Again, January 26:-- Sumner comes to dinner. He was last night at our neighbor C.'s, looking over his engravings; and this morning at Thies's house, engaged on his private collection. Verily, he goes thoroughly through the work. Sumner began at this time to collect engravings for himself,--those now preserved in the Boston Art Museum. To Dr. Howe he wrote, March 17: I wish you would be good enough to send to Louis Thies, of Cambridge, a check for one ZZZZ The best portraits in engraving. Works, vol. XIV. pp. 327, 328. hundred dollars on my account. He is my most amiable and faithful teacher in engravings, who has undertaken to order from Europe a few choice old productions for me. He gratified this taste a few months later in Paris, both in looking over collections and also in purchases. He appreciated the general effect of an engraving, but he
March 21st (search for this): chapter 13
I have not been able to go in that direction. I have sympathized in your sorrows, which I know must be grievous, requiring all of your fortitude and Christian hope, with the solace of remaining children to be borne. Good-bye. God bless you! During his absence Sumner kept a journal, the only time he ever kept one, except during a part of his former journey to Europe. It was very brief,—made up of mere jottings of each day's experiences; and the larger part of it is here given:— March 21. A most interesting day. The steamer entered the dock [at Havre] between six and seven o'clock in the morning, and we landed about eight o'clock. Walked about and enjoyed the foreign aspect; went through the farce of custom-house and of passports, and started at eleven o'clock on the railroad for Rouen. The carriages and the—whole management of the road were in contrast with ours, and the country through which we passed was charming. Reached Rouen at two o'clock; stopped at Hotel d'anglet<
March 23rd (search for this): chapter 13
aris was by the same route which he traversed by sailing vessel and stage-coach nineteen years before. The condition of his health during the voyage is described in the New York Tribune, April 11, 13. Reaching Paris by way of Havre and Rouen, March 23, he found there American and English friends to welcome him,—among the former T. G. Appleton, Mr. and Mrs. George B. Emerson, and Madame Laugel; and among the latter, Nassau W. Senior. His first friendly office was a search for Crawford the artother day, partly for rest, and partly to enjoy still more the old town; heard mass and vespers in the venerable cathedral; for several hours drove in an open carriage in the environs, and passed a couple of hours at the opera in the evening. March 23. Left Rouen this morning at half-past 9 o'clock. The day was fine for March. Much struck by the whole management of the railroad, particularly when the train stopped for refreshments. Civilization seemed to abound. On arriving at Paris,. . .
March 24th (search for this): chapter 13
First of all, tried to find my old French teacher, M. Debidas, 1 Ante. vol. i. pp. 240. 241. 243. 52 Rue St. Dominique. On applying there, the concierge, who had been there twelve years, told me that he had never heard of him; he is perhaps dead. Next called at two different hotels to inquire for Crawford, but could hear nothing of him. Enjoyed part of the Rivoli, the Palais Royal, and the Boulevards, and then two hours at the French opera,— William tell; home, weary, very weary. March 24. Called on T. G. Appleton, who took me to drive through the new Rivoli and the Boulevards. The improvements are prodigious. Dined with him at his rooms, and then went with him to the Opesra Comique, where I enjoyed very much a new piece,— Psyche. March 25. Moved to the Hotel de la Paix, at the corner of Rue de la Paix and the Boulevards, where I have a beautiful apartment from which I can see all the movement of Paris. At last found where Crawford lodged, but could not see him. His wi
March 25th (search for this): chapter 13
alled at two different hotels to inquire for Crawford, but could hear nothing of him. Enjoyed part of the Rivoli, the Palais Royal, and the Boulevards, and then two hours at the French opera,— William tell; home, weary, very weary. March 24. Called on T. G. Appleton, who took me to drive through the new Rivoli and the Boulevards. The improvements are prodigious. Dined with him at his rooms, and then went with him to the Opesra Comique, where I enjoyed very much a new piece,— Psyche. March 25. Moved to the Hotel de la Paix, at the corner of Rue de la Paix and the Boulevards, where I have a beautiful apartment from which I can see all the movement of Paris. At last found where Crawford lodged, but could not see him. His wife told me of his condition, which is sad. I went away sorrowful; walked in the garden of the Tuileries; dined at Trois Freres, Palais Royal, and then played the flaneur, looking into shop windows as I walked along. March 26. Wrote letters home; visited the
March 26th (search for this): chapter 13
ery much a new piece,— Psyche. March 25. Moved to the Hotel de la Paix, at the corner of Rue de la Paix and the Boulevards, where I have a beautiful apartment from which I can see all the movement of Paris. At last found where Crawford lodged, but could not see him. His wife told me of his condition, which is sad. I went away sorrowful; walked in the garden of the Tuileries; dined at Trois Freres, Palais Royal, and then played the flaneur, looking into shop windows as I walked along. March 26. Wrote letters home; visited the Invalides, and saw the new tomb of Napoleon; then visited Mr. William B. Greene and his most intelligent wife, living off beyond the Luxembourg; saw something of that quarter; then dined with Elliot C. Cowdin, a merchant here, once connected with the mercantile Library Association [of Boston],—the first time I have met company at dinner for ten months; then to the Italian opera, where I heard the last part of II Barbiere di Siviglia. March 27. Enjoyed a d
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