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Paris, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
d sooner arrest the attention of the stranger; whither would a man of reflection and serious temper sooner direct his steps? Had such a Cemetery, with prophetic forethought of posterity, been laid out in the first settlement of the country, and all our venerated dead,--the eminent in church and state-been deposited side by side, with plain but enduring monuments, it would possess already an interest of the most elevated and affecting character. Such a place of deposit is Pee la Chaise near Paris, which has already become a spot of the greatest interest and attraction, furnishing the model to similar establishments in various parts of Europe, and well deserving to be had in view, in that which is in contemplation here. The vicinity of our venerable University suggests an interesting train of associations, connected with this spot. It has ever been the favorite resort of the students. There are hundreds now living, who have passed some of the happiest hours of the happiest period
Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
rden and Cemetery, a tract of land, commonly known by the name of Sweet Auburn, near the road leading from Cambridge to Watertown, containing about seventy-two acres, for the sum of six thousand dollars: provided this sum can be raised in the manner The tract of land which bears this name, is situated on the Southerly side of the main road leading from Cambridge to Watertown, partly within the limits of both those towns, and distant about four miles from Boston. Formerly it was known by the s woody and irregular shores. Country seats and cottages seen in various directions, and those on the elevated land at Watertown, especially, add much to the picturesque effect of the scene. The grounds of the Cemetery were laid out with interseether with such other persons as are Proprietors of Lots in the Cemetery at Mount Auburn, in the towns of Cambridge and Watertown, in the County of Middlesex, and who shall in writing signify their assent to this Act, their successors and assigns be
Mount Auburn (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
History of Mount Auburn. The celebrity attained by Mount Auburn, pronounced by European travellers the most beautiful Cemetery in existeMount Auburn, pronounced by European travellers the most beautiful Cemetery in existence, and which, perhaps, without assuming too much, may be called the Pere la Chaise of America,--the extraordinary natural loveliness of the it is probably a result of the formation of the establishment at Mount Auburn itself. Something more and better than the mere love of noveltycontinually made from these parties, for information relating to Mount Auburn. The multitudes of foreigners and other strangers, who frequent adoption of measures for the foundation of the establishment at Mount Auburn, are such as are already familiar, we must presume, to such of otee was appointed to procure an accurate topographical survey of Mount Auburn, and report a plan for laying it out into lots. This service wain every heart, and pervaded the whole scene. Some account of Mount Auburn itself, as it existed at this stage of its history, may with pro
Charles (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
hborhood of a large town, but not in harmony with the character of a place of burial. It stands near a fine sweep in Charles River. It presents every variety of surface, rising in one part into a beautiful elevation, level in others, with intermedst purchase of the Society included between seventy and eighty acres, extending from the road nearly to the banks of Charles River. The Experimental Garden commenced by the Association was to have been upon that portion of the ground next to the ralk. The principal eminence, called Mount Auburn in the plan, is one hundred and twenty-five feet above the level of Charles river, and commands from its summit one of the finest prospects which can be obtained in the environs of Boston. On one side is the city in full view, connected at its extremities with Charlestown and Roxbury. The serpentine course of Charles River, with the cultivated hills and fields rising beyond it, and having the Blue Hills of Milton in the distance, occupies ano
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
for some years increasing and extending throughout the American community. In no small degree it is probably a result of the formation of the establishment at Mount Auburn itself. Something more and better than the mere love of novelty, or the ordinary admiration of what is admirable, is certainly at its foundation. It shows itself in works that speak louder than any language. Our Cemetery has become, within the few years of its existence, a model for all similar institutions in the United States, and more of these have been founded within the last half dozen years, than during the whole two centuries that preceded them. At this moment, associations in several of our principal cities and towns are engaged in such undertakings. It is well known that applications are continually made from these parties, for information relating to Mount Auburn. The multitudes of foreigners and other strangers, who frequent the northern metropolis during the travelling season, experience the same
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
in these tributes of respect, and the place may gradually become the honorary mausoleum for the distinguished sons of Massachusetts. This design, though but recently made public, has been long in contemplation; and, as is believed, has been favor the following Act was applied for and obtained: An Act, in addition to an Act entitled, an Act to incorporate the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirtyCommonwealth of Massachusetts. In the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one. section I: Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, That the Massachusetts Horticultural Society be, and hereby are, authorized, in addition to the powers alreadybtained from the Legislature of the Commonwealth, for the incorporation of the proprietors by themselves: Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty five. An Act to incorporate the Propriet
Mount Auburn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
as a secluded and favorite walk. The principal eminence, called Mount Auburn in the plan, is one hundred and twenty-five feet above the leveling tomb is provided in the City, and one will be constructed at Mount Auburn, in which, if desired, bodies may be deposited for a term not exwelve dollars to one hundred dollars, each lot,) was $957,50. Mount Auburn, it is generally well known, is now the property of a separate asuch other persons as are Proprietors of Lots in the Cemetery at Mount Auburn, in the towns of Cambridge and Watertown, in the County of Middlation may take and hold in fee simple the Garden and Cemetery at Mount Auburn, now held by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, and any otal Society a legal conveyance of the said Garden and Cemetery at Mount Auburn, the Massachusetts Horticultural Society shall cease to have any To the summary sketch here given of the present condition of Mount Auburn, it may be proper to add that it is believed to be the intention
Auburn, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
evived in any way by these immediate parties. The next movement was in 1830, when Dr. Bigelow, having obtained from George W. Brimmer, Esq., the offer of Sweet Auburn, for a Public Cemetery, at the price of six thousand dollars, communicated the fact to the officers of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, and engaged their the Hon. E. Everett acted as Secretary. Great interest and equanimity were expressed in regard to the design of the meeting. It was now voted to purchase Sweet Auburn, provided one hundred subscribers could be obtained, at sixty dollars each; also to appoint a Committee of twenty to report on a general plan of proceedings propeat which the Committee of twenty reported- 1. That it is expedient to purchase, for a Garden and Cemetery, a tract of land, commonly known by the name of Sweet Auburn, near the road leading from Cambridge to Watertown, containing about seventy-two acres, for the sum of six thousand dollars: provided this sum can be raised in th
Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
. A remarkable natural ridge with a level surface runs through the ground from south-east to north-west, and has for many years been known as a secluded and favorite walk. The principal eminence, called Mount Auburn in the plan, is one hundred and twenty-five feet above the level of Charles river, and commands from its summit one of the finest prospects which can be obtained in the environs of Boston. On one side is the city in full view, connected at its extremities with Charlestown and Roxbury. The serpentine course of Charles River, with the cultivated hills and fields rising beyond it, and having the Blue Hills of Milton in the distance, occupies another portion of the landscape. The village of Cambridge, with the venerable edifices of Harvard University, are situated about a mile to the east-ward. On the north, at a very small distance, Fresh Pond appears, a handsome sheet of water, finely diversified by its woody and irregular shores. Country seats and cottages seen in
History of Mount Auburn. The celebrity attained by Mount Auburn, pronounced by European travellers the most beautiful Cemetery in existence, and which, perhaps, without assuming too much, may be called the Pere la Chaise of America,--the extraordinary natural loveliness of the spot,--the admirable character of the establishment which is there maintained,--the fact that this was the first conspicuous example of the kind in our country,--these, with many others we might mention, are considerations strongly in favor of putting on record a more accurate and complete history of its origin and progress than has yet been given to the public. Nor need we suppose that such an account will concern only the numerous class of individuals, chiefly belonging to our own vicinity, whose interest in this Cemetery is yet of the deepest and most delicate character,--that which kindred feel in the dust and monuments of kindred, and in the ground, whatever and wherever it may be, in whose bosom they
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